Conditional Use Permit approved.

august08 0144/5/16PowWow
The Saguache County Board of Commissioners had approved our Conditional Use Permit! Finally after a year of negotiations, The County has reached an agreement that we may use The 1074 Lariat Trail Property for Religious gatherings.powwow 2012 069 The agreement includes a lot of conditions and restrictions that most residences would never have, but we are happy to be able to represent Indigenous American Spiritual traditions in a proper, publicly recognized way. Thank you Saguache County for approving our right to the freedom of assembly and religious freedom of expression in our home. We are grateful for what we have.Alta
We have been allowed to have 4 Ceremonies each year (with 30 people), and one Sweat Lodge each month (with 20 people). There may be no more than 20 cars in our parking lot and all ceremonies are to be preformed indoors. We will post the other conditions as they become published.

Woundedknee1891

Native Religious Liberty

THE RED ROAD TO RIGHTSNativeAmerican

Freedom of expression is undeniably guaranteed both as a First Amendment issue and under specific federal statutes, regulations and executive orders. Many Americans don’t realize this was not always the case. Until 1978, American Indians on reservations had no religious rights and were specifically barred from practicing traditional ceremonies. These efforts were driven by fear of uprisings by Native populations, most notably epitomized by the massacre at Wounded Knee, Dec. 29, 1890, when Lakota men, women and children were gunned down while gathering for a Ghost Dance, a Christian influenced spiritual practice.

Woundedknee1891

Historically, the federal government sought to eradicate all forms of traditional spiritual practice and belief on reservations through use of boarding schools (separating children from parents), prohibiting use of Native languages, and making gatherings for ceremonial purposes illegal.  The expressed intent was to “civilize” Native peoples; a policy begun under treaties well before The Trail of Tears forced removal marches in the 1830s with Cherokee and other Eastern tribes. The result was a sustained federal policy of social and cultural annihilation.Carlisle_pupils

 

The justification for this denial of religious freedom, inexplicably enough, was that Native peoples were sovereign nations by treaty and not granted the freedoms that American “citizens” claimed as fundamental rights.  Under “sovereignty,” the U.S. government occupied the reservations, kept control of the populations through military might, imposed arbitrary civil orders and prevented them from exercising freedoms guaranteed Americans under the U.S. Constitution, including the First Amendment freedom of religion that is bedrock to the Bill of Rights.Patriotic-Eagle

This changed in 1978 with The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, and subsequent amendment.

It states, that, by act of Congress, Aug. 11, 1978 (U.S. Code, Title 42, Chapter 21, Subchapter I, 1996) it is “the policy of the United States to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express, and exercise {their} traditional religions . . . . including but not limited to . . . . use and possession of sacred objects, and the freedom to worship through ceremonials and traditional rites.” See:  http://www.cr.nps.gov/local-law/FHPL_IndianRelFreAct.pdf

religious freedom

Flowing from the right to worship freely is the recognition that sacred sites, lands taken and/or controlled by the federal government that are traditionally held holy by Native Americans, should not be barred from access.  This also includes objects, artifacts and human remains.

From this consideration, more legislation was passed, including:

— Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act — 104 STAT. 3048 Public Law 101-601 — NOV. 16, 1990 (http://www.cr.nps.gov/nagpra/MANDATES/25USC3001etseq.htm)

— Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 — Public Law 96-95; 16 U.S.C. 470aa-mm (www.cr.nps.gov/local-law/FHPL_ArchRsrcsProt.pdf)

— Various executive orders, including Executive Order 13007, May 24, 1996, designating “Sacred Sites.”

 U.N.

INTERNATIONAL LAW

The statutes, orders and rules issued by Congress, presidents and federal rule-making bodies give specific directions and remedies so Native Americans have recourse to government to ensure religious freedoms.  Religious freedom is also well grounded in international law, with the United States a signatory to more than a dozen conventions.

 

They include:

— Draft United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN 1994)  Article 13: “Indigenous peoples have the right to manifest, practice, develop and teach their spiritual and religious traditions, customs and ceremonies; the right to maintain, protect, and have access in privacy to their religious and cultural sites; the right to the use and control of ceremonial objects; and the right to the repatriation of human remains.”

 

— Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief (UN 1981)

Article 1(1): “Everyone shall have the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. This right shall include freedom to have a religion or whatever belief of his choice, and freedom, either individually or in community with others and in pubic or in private, to manifest his religion or belief in worship, observance, practice and teaching.”

 

Article 1(2): “No one shall be subject to coercion which would impair his freedom to have a religion or belief of his choice.”

Article 4(1): “All States shall take effective measures to prevent and eliminate discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief.”

 

BLOOD QUANTUM

As the international conventions and agreements amply outline, religious freedom is to be broadly interpreted and fundamentally ensured.  As a signatory to these agreements, with its promulgation and support of democracy in the world, as well as its pronouncements of adherence to constitutional mandates, the United States would seem to be a premier international champion of religious rights and foremost in ensuring them.  Yet, such is not the case, at least when it comes to Native American Spirituality upon these shores. Where the United States falls short is intrinsically woven in its very history with Native Americans from the start.

Most federal policies directing efforts to ensure religious rights are confined to lists of federally recognized tribes, which specify blood quantum for federal recognition.cherokee

This poses several dilemmas. First, if a tribe’s authorization is removed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) for whatever reason, members of that tribe are no longer covered by federal rules and regulations protecting their religious rights.  Second, even if members of a tribe are historically and demonstrably members of a tribe, the tribe itself determines membership according to federally prescribed guidelines on blood quantum. In recent years, tribes increasingly have tightened blood quantum restrictions as a result of casino revenues, delisting even longstanding tribal members. Third, if an individual is denied tribal enrollment for blood quantum reasons, that person is no longer recognized as “Native American” under federal law and, hence, no longer falls within the scope of federal authority and protection of religious rights as specifically defined for Native Americans.

If, for example, a tribe requires one-quarter blood through genealogy to be an enrolled member, what happens to succeeding generations of descendents? They automatically are disenfranchised, are no longer considered “Native American” as defined by law, and therefore are no longer covered by the statutes, regulations and acts passed by Congress to ensure their rights.

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A SYSTEM SET UP TO FAIL.

How crazy is this blood-quantum system when used to determine federally recognized tribes?

As one example: “The Osage Nation of Oklahoma has just four members — all older than 96 — who are recognized by the federal government. More than 20,000 Osage descendants in several states, including Kansas, Oklahoma, Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas, aren’t. A 1906 law gave all those on the rolls before June 30, 1907, a portion called a headright. Those 2,229 people are the only federally recognized members of the Osage Nation. Those members have about 4,000 descendants, 3,000 of whom have voting rights in what is similar to a corporation with shareholders. Only when a person inherits a headright or a portion of a headright does he or she have voting rights. However, those rights don’t make those descendants members.”

Nov. 2012 068

Even now, varying from tribe to tribe, there are such anomalies as a non-tribal woman having certain privileges, such as healthcare, while carrying a tribal member’s child, but none before or after the baby is born. The baby will have tribal privileges after it is born if blood-quantum is sufficient.

 

November 10 040While some point to the fact that there are over 500 BIA tribes, many if not most are composed of few members; plus, federal recognition is constantly changing. Even traditional, long-standing historic tribes (such as the Delaware, which was the first tribe to sign a treaty with the newly formed United States) have had their recognition removed, for various reasons, leaving their descendants in a quandary.

Lawsuits involving recognition and the revocation of recognition are constant and unrelenting, leading to tribes to care more about BIA rules (to keep federal dollars flowing) than their “sovereignty.”

Some helpful links:

 

O.U. Collage of Law

American Humanist Association

Amnesty International

Freedom House

Human Rights Watch 

Institute for Global Engagement

The Institute for Religion and Public Policy

The Institute on Religion and Democracy

Advocates International

Alliance Defending Freedom

American Center for Law and Justice

Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief

Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences

UN Human Rights Council

All UN Human Rights Bodies

UN Third Committee

Legal Notice: Terms of Use Agreement
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P.O.A. and the Fair Housing Act

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Click this link to file your complaint:  www.hud.gov

Federal Law Prohibits Housing Discrimination

The Fair Housing Act prohibits anyone from refusing to sell or rent housing to a possible buyer or tenant based on that person’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. This act also prohibits housing discrimination based on family status. A seller or landlord cannot refuse to sell or rent to a buyer or renter who is a parent or guardian of a person under the age of 18.

A POA’s regulations often give the board of directors the right to approve new buyers or renters. Because a POA must follow the rules of the Fair Housing Act, a POA board cannot reject a new resident based on the person’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or familial status.

A housing provider may not:

  • (1) Refuse to allow reasonable modifications to a dwelling.
  • (2) Refuse to make reasonable accommodations in rules, polices, practices, and services.

The federal Fair Housing Act and Fair Housing Amendments Act (42 U.S. Code §§ 3601-3619, 3631) prohibit landlords from choosing tenants on the basis of a group characteristic such as race, religion, ethnic background, sex, familial status or disablity.

Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use
“Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use”

“It shall be unlawful to discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of sale or rental of a dwelling, or the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because of race,color, religion , sex, familial status, or national origin 42 U.S.C. 3604(b)”

The FHA applies to:
♠ Direct providers of housing;
♠ Entities and associations that set terms and conditions for housing; and
♠ Entities and associations that provide services and facilities in connection with housing

Courts have held that the FHA Applies to Community
Associations — including POA’s HOA’s and Condo Associations.
♠ Community Associations set rules and covenants that apply to homeowners.
♠ Community Associations provide services or facilities in connection with housing.

♠ Thus, Community Associations are “housing providers” under the FHA.

Flag-banner-Patriotic-GraphicsFairy2

♥ Block v. Frischholz, 587 F.3d 771 (7thCir 2009)Plaintiff, an orthodox Jew, sued Condominium Association and Board president for religious discrimination because Board refused to allow
him to have a religious display on his exterior door.

♥ The FHA Applies to Community Associations cont.Housing Opportunities Project for Excellence, Inc. v.
Key Colony No. 4 Condominium Assoc., 510 F. Supp. 2d 1003 (S.D. Fla. 2007)Plaintiff sued POA and POA board members under FHA and Florida housing laws claiming that occupancy restrictions and rules for pool and clubhouse discriminated against families with children.

♥ The FHA Applies to Community Associations Savanna Club Worship Service, Inc. v. Savanna Club
Homeowners’ Association, 456 F. Supp. 2d 1223 (S.D. Fla. 2005)Owners of a religious club sued POA and board members because the POA prohibited religious services in common areas
Note: The Court dismissed the Plaintiff’s claims because the POA applied its restrictions in a neutral manner. The Court recognized, however, that POA’s are governed by the FHA since they control and regulate certain property rights, such as use of common areas and facilities.

Antique-Patriotic-Eagle-Image-GraphicsFairy

Community Associations:
Restrictive Covenants
♠ Courts across the country have allowed lawsuits to proceed based on discriminatory covenant enforcement.
♠ Racially-restrictive covenants were a major reason for the implementation of the FHA in 1968.
♠ Currently, race, religion, and national origin are major areas of enforcement and risk for
Community Associations.

Community Associations:
Restrictive Covenants cont.Tokh v. Water Tower Court Home Owner Association, 327 Fed. Appx. 630 (7
thCir. 2009).In Tokh, a member of an POA sued his POA and its Management Company for national origin and race discrimination after being fined for enlarging a patio in violation of the POA’s covenants.

Jamestown, America's first Property Owners Association.

Jamestown, America’s first Property Owners Association.

Potential FHA violations
♠ POA allows religious groups to use a community chapel facility but not non-religious groups
♠ Condominium Association waives fee for Boy Scouts of America to use community room for free but charges other groups
♠ Community pool establishes “adult swim” hours
♠ Community Association-controlled golf course restricts men from playing on Tuesday mornings

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Civil Violations
♦ Civil Penalties include fines of up to $10,000 for a violation of the FHA and up to $74,000 for multiple
violations
♦ Injunctive and equitable relief to stop and change practices and policies that violate the FHA
♦ Payment of Court costs and attorneys’ fees to the Government
♦ Individual penalties and liability for board members and other individuals!!

Criminal Penalties
♦ Violations of the FHA that involve threats, intimidation, or violence can also lead to criminal fines and imprisonment.

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How can a renter file a discrimination complaint?

A POA-HOA member who thinks that an HOA/POA has broken a federal fair housing law should contact a local office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the agency that enforces the Fair Housing Act, or check the HUD website at www.hud.gov. (POA-HOA members must file the complaint within one year of the alleged discriminatory act.)

HUD will provide a complaint form (POA-HOA members can fill the form out online) and will investigate and decide whether there is reasonable cause to believe that the fair housing law has been broken. If the answer is yes, HUD will typically appoint a mediator to negotiate with the HOA and reach a settlement (called a “conciliation”). If a settlement is later broken, HUD will recommend that the Attorney General file a lawsuit.

If the discrimination is a violation of a state fair housing law, the tenant may file a complaint with the state agency in charge of enforcing the law. In California, for example, the Department of Fair Employment and Housing enforces the state’s two fair housing laws.

Also, instead of filing a complaint with HUD or a state agency, tenants may file lawsuits directly in federal or state court. If a state or federal court or housing agency finds that discrimination has taken place, a tenant may be awarded damages, including any higher rent paid as a result of being turned down, an order directing the landlord to offer the rental to the tenant, and compensation for humiliation or emotional distress.

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To read The Fair Housing Act Click here!

Source: HOA Leader, Colorado Homeowners Association Law, Lawyers.com, HUD

 Religious Rights

  Religious Rights


If you are are experiencing Religious persecution click the links below to learn what to do about it.
  To read about the fair housing act and The Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

 Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA)

Click here to Read the American Indian Religious Freedom Act !

Click here to read The Universal Declaration of Human Rights!

The Office of International Religious Freedom has the mission of promoting religious freedom as a core objective of U.S. foreign policy. The office is headed by Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom Suzan Johnson Cook. We monitor religious persecution and discrimination worldwide, recommend and implement policies in respective regions or countries, and develop programs to promote religious freedom

department_of_state.svgInternational Coalition for Religious Freedom  “is a non-profit, non-sectarian, educational organization dedicated to defending the religious freedom of all, regardless of creed, gender, or ethnic origin.

The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice,  created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.

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The First Amendment Center, We support the First Amendment and build understanding of its core freedoms through education, information and entertainment.

Religious Tolerance, Ontario consultants on religious tolerance. An awesome site!

American Center for Law and Justice  (ACLJ) and its globally affiliated organizations are committed to ensuring the ongoing viability of freedom and liberty in the United States and around the world.

American Civil Liberties Union,The ACLU is our nation’s guardian of liberty, working daily in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country.

CESNUR (Center for Studies on New Religions), CHANGING RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN A CHANGING WORLD.

CESNUR - center for studies on new religions

First Freedom Center , The mission of the First Freedom Center is to advance the fundamental human rights of freedom of religion and freedom of conscience.

Image result for First Freedom Center

The Leadership Conference,

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights is a coalition charged by its diverse membership of more than 200 national organizations to promote and protect the civil and human rights of all persons in the United States. 

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights  & The Leadership Conference Education Fund

Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, The Research Institute of The ERLC represents an evangelical think tank that includes university and seminary presidents, academic deans, professors, lawyers, doctors, theologians, and other evangelical scholars.

The Freedom Forum On Line, The center serves as a forum for the study and exploration of free-expression issues, including freedom of speech, of the press and of religion, and the rights to assemble and to petition the government.

Liberty Counsel, Restoring the culture by advancing religious freedom, the sanctity of human life and the family.

People For the American Way, Our America respects diversity, nurtures creativity and combats hatred and bigotry.

 

The Rutherford Institute, Dedicated to the defense of civil liberties and human rights.

Religion Link, All of our writers have years of experience in the field of religion reporting. They are well versed in the many religions and issues that are covered in mainstream media.

USCIRF, is an independent, bipartisan U.S. federal government commission, the first of its kind in the world, that monitors the universal right to freedom of religion or belief abroad.

Concerned Women for America, through its Board of Trustees has established Religious Liberty as one of its seven core issues on which we focus our efforts.

Liberty Institute, Unfortunately, religious liberty is under attack — in our churches, in our schools and in the public arena – like never before in American history.

American Religious Freedom, Protecting religious freedom for all Faiths.

The home of The Singing Stone

Image

March 2016, Work continues!

Here is a slideshow of our progress so far.

Now that things are warming up a bit, we will be working on The Singing Stone Building Project again! If you would like to help check in with us.

As of March 17th 2016, we would like to announce that the Baca Grande Planning committee has approved the Conditional use permit for our residence! The next step would be for Saguache County Commissioners to grant the permit.

Bus coach from Denver

Bus Service

 

Daily Bus Service: Denver-Moffat-Alamosa
Arrow/Black Hills Stage Lines: call (877) 779-2999 or purchase tickets online.

Car Rentals at Alamosa Airport
1) Budget Car Rental: (719) 589-0103
2) L & M Automobile Rental: (719) 589-4651

Denver at 1:40 pm > Moffat at 6 pm
Moffat at 7:00 am > Denver at 11:15 am

Trailways Transportation System

BLACK HILLS STAGE LINES

For the journey to Crestone one option is to take the bus. Black Hills Stage Lines (phone: 402-371-3850) runs a bus that travels daily from Denver to Moffat.  We can arrange for someone to meet you at the bus stop in Moffat and drive you the remaining 20 minutes to The Singing Stone.

The Black Hills Stage Line departs from the Denver Greyhound bus station at approximately 1:45 pm and arrives in Moffat just after 6:00 pm, and the fare is $35.00 Tickets can be booked here: http://www.blackhillsstagelines.com/default.asp.

If you are flying in to DEN prior to taking the bus, you will need to plan your flight arrival to allow enough travel time to arrive at the bus station before 1:45 pm.  We recommend arriving at DEN by 11:00 a.m. Denver city buses will take you to the bus station from DEN.  The AF bus route can take you from the airport to the Denver bus station. The AF bus leaves once an hour. For schedule information go to Denver RTD at http://www.rtd-denver.com. The fare is $9 and is payable by cash as you board the bus. You must have exact change.

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Directions to Crestone, CO.

Getting To Crestone, CO

Airports
The nearest regional airport is Alamosa, which is about 1 hour south of Crestone. You will need to you will need to get a ride from Alamosa to Crestone, so call us (719) 256-5307.

There are also airports in Colorado Springs (3 hours), Denver (4 hours) and Albuquerque (5 hours). There is a daily bus service between Denver and Alamosa, which stops in Moffat. We can arrange a ride for you from Moffat to Crestone (25 minutes).

Car Rentals at Alamosa Airport
1) Budget Car Rental: (719) 589-0103
2) L & M Automobile Rental: (719) 589-4651

Daily Bus Service: Denver-Moffat-Alamosa
Arrow/Black Hills Stage Lines: call (877) 779-2999 or purchase tickets online.

Denver at 1:40 pm > Moffat at 6 pm
Moffat at 7:00 am > Denver at 11:15 am

Flying ⊕

Most people fly into Denver International Airport (DEN), which is a 4-1/4 hour drive from Crestone. You can also fly into Alamosa County Airport (ALS), which is a 1-hour drive to Crestone.

People also choose to fly into Albuquerque, NM, a 5-hour drive to the south from Crestone. Twin Hearts Express ((575) 751-1201) offers service from Albuquerque airport to Alamosa.

Denver flights tend be less expensive and involve fewer connections.

Bus Service

Black Hills Stage Lines (phone: 402-371-3850) runs a bus that travels daily from Denver to Moffat.  We can arrange for someone to meet you at the bus stop in Moffat and drive you the remaining 20 minutes to The Singing Stone.

The Black Hills Stage Line departs from the Denver Greyhound bus station at approximately 1:45 pm and arrives in Moffat just after 6:00 pm, and the fare is $35.00 Tickets can be booked here: http://www.blackhillsstagelines.com/default.asp.

If you are flying in to DEN prior to taking the bus, you will need to plan your flight arrival to allow enough travel time to arrive at the bus station before 1:45 pm.  We recommend arriving at DEN by 11:00 a.m. Denver city buses will take you to the bus station from DEN.  The AF bus route can take you from the airport to the Denver bus station. The AF bus leaves once an hour. For schedule information go to Denver RTD at http://www.rtd-denver.com. The fare is $9 and is payable by cash as you board the bus. You must have exact change.

For the return trip from Crestone back to Denver, We will give you a ride to the Moffat bus stop. The bus leaves daily from Moffat at approximately 6:30 a.m. and arrives in Denver at 11:15 a.m.  From the Denver bus station, the AF bus will take you back to DIA (please see bus schedule link above). Plan your flight’s departure time to allow for enough travel time to the airport.

Driving to The Singing Stone.

Getting to Crestone From Denver International Airport/DEN

(You can check these directions for updates with Google Maps or Mapquest)

  • Take Pena Blvd South/West for about 10 miles, until it merges into I-70 West.
  • Take I-70 West for about 25 miles.
  • Merge onto CO-470 E via Exit 260 toward Colorado Springs, and go 5.7 miles.
  • Merge onto US-285 South toward Fairplay.
  • Take 285 South through Fairplay, through Johnson Village, South, on 285 through Villa Grove (about 150 miles).
  • After passing through Villa Grove watch for a turnoff from 285 to RT 17 on your Left.
  • Take RT 17 through Moffat.
  • As you are about to pass the southern end of Moffat, look for a small sign for Crestone.
  • You will turn Left on T Road heading East towards Crestone.
  • After turning from Hwy 17 onto County Rd T, go 10 miles, toward the mountains.
  • As you come into town, you’ll notice that the speed limit is reduced, and there is a church on the left.
  • About a minute after passing the church, you’ll come to wide fork in the road.
  • Take a right at the fork onto Camino Baca Grande, into the community marked as The Baca (note: bearing left at this fork takes you into downtown Crestone). drive two miles.
  • Take a left on W Badger Road (or left on Camino Real).
  • Go Right onto Wagon Wheel and keep going for 1 mile.
  • Bear left onto Camino del Rey.
  • Take a right onto N Stallion Trail for 200 feet.
  • Take a right onto Lariat Trail for 300 feet.

 

The Baca Grande

The Baca Grande

To find specific addresses in the Baca or the town of Crestone, go to Google Maps and use the Directions tab at https://maps.google.com/

Getting to Crestone from Albuquerque International Sunport

(Directions are from MapQuest)

  • Start out going east on Sunport Blvd SE toward Yale Blvd SE.
  • Merge onto I-25N/US85N toward I-40/Albuquerque Downtown/Santa Fe.
  • Take the US-84 N/US-285 N/St Francis Dr exit, EXIT 282B-A, toward Santa Fe-Plaza.
  • Merge onto US-84 N/US-285 N via the ramp on the left toward Santa Fe Plaza/Los Alamos/Taos. Turn left onto S Paseo de Onate/US-84 N/US-285 N.
  • Continue to follow US-84 N/US-285 N.
  • Turn right onto US-285 N/County Road 55.
  • Continue to follow US-285 N (Crossing into Colorado).
  • Turn right onto US-285 N/CO-17/CO-285.
  • Continue to follow US-285 N/CO-17.
  • Turn right onto 6th St/US-160 E.
  • Turn left onto Denver Ave/US-160 E.
  • Continue to follow US-160 E.
  • Turn left onto 1st St/CO-17.
  • Continue to follow CO-17.
  • Turn right onto County Road T.
  • After turning from Hwy 17 onto County Rd T, go 10 miles, toward the mountains.
  • As you come into town, you’ll notice that the speed limit is reduced, and there is a church on the left.
  • About a minute after passing the church, you’ll come to wide fork in the road.
  • Go right at the fork onto Camino Baca Grande, into the community marked as The Baca (note: bearing left at this fork takes you into downtown Crestone).
  • About a minute after passing the church, you’ll come to wide fork in the road
  • Take a right at the fork onto Camino Baca Grande, into the community marked as The Baca (note: bearing left at this fork takes you into downtown Crestone). drive two miles.
  • Take a left on W Badger Road (or left on Camino Real).
  • Go Right onto Wagon Wheel and keep going for 1 mile.
  • Bear left onto Camino del Rey.
  • Take a right onto N Stallion Trail for 200 feet.
  • Take a right onto Lariat Trail for 300 feet.

 

The Baca Grande

The Baca Grande

Please keep in mind that Crestone is a quiet community which values slow car speeds (to reduce noise). The roads are shared by pedestrians, cyclists, and various animals, so it is very important to be alert and aware when driving in Crestone.

Wiwila Oyate

All over the world, on every continent and in every culture one can hear stories of a tiny race of people who live underground. Through the illustrations of children’s books one can see that this belief survived the Inquisition and the domination of Christianity. The Little People may be small but their presence is strong among those who have seen and encountered them. Like the Tree Spirits (Fairies) and the Sasquatch (Bigfoot), many cultures share the lore of these mythical beings, even into present day.

Lore of the Little People, Elves, Leprechauns or Gnomes is so incredibly vast that it would take a lifetime to record all the known stories of them. Like the Tree Fairies and Bigfoot, the stories continue as people encounter them. One theme that remains constant in all cultures is how these mythical being are visiting us less and less as we recede away into the realm of logic. The more domestic we become, the more preposterous these old stories seem.

Wiwila is the Lakota word for Spring, a place where water flows from the earth. Wiwila Oyate is one of several names for the Little People, The Spring Nation. The Wiwila are said to have been created before humankind. Made to regulate the seasons, the movement of the planets, the waterways and springs, these people are some times seen by others, reminding us of the stories of old.

Whatever the culture, the stories of them usually include the granting of a wish, some sort of trickery or a combination of both. Always there seems to be an element of danger or harm that may befall one who harasses them. It is believed that when venturing into the wilderness one should take heed not to trespass into Wiwila territory or suffer the invisible arrows shot by little men. While the Wiwila is feared and avoided in most cases, there is a time and place where they are still called upon for help, Yuwipi.

Nowhere is the Wiwila more prevalent than in the Yuwipi and lowanpi Ceremonies. They can be seen, heard running about and are often felt and recognized by their tiny hands. Usually one would not speak of them, let alone write about them on the computer! Now we have reached a time where we must remind the human race about the servants of the earth and of the other beings who live in symbiosis with us here. It may seem unreasonable to modern culture that they exist, but the fact remains that they do.

The Wiwila, among other beings, are said to have inhabited the earth before humankind, at some point they are said to have called us, or wished us here with their intention, drawing us from the Pleiades. This is not just Lakota myth, many cultures believed this at one time. It is said that the creator gave us intelligence to appreciate his artwork, but it is also said that we were given intelligence in order to communicate with the divine beings. So that when the Wiwila needed help in regulating nature, they could call upon the humans for help.

As a race, we seem unable to hear them now but they are calling to us still, even through the chatter of our own minds. Around the industrial revolution there are literally thousands of stories of warnings from the Little people all over the world. It is so strange that these stories are so obscure and hard to find because it was not so long ago that the Industrial revolution began. In Germany, each town and province has stories of their warnings, that the they are leaving because of the construction of some machine or factory in the area. There are literally thousands of such stories across Europe.

Could it be that the modern concept of aliens is none other than the original inhabitants of this world? In Native American understanding, the Star Nations (wicahpi Oyate), are the the gods and goddesses who live in the heavens, not alien races. Obviously there seems to be life everywhere, but these alien characters seem more like elves than astronauts! Whatever the case may be, their message is clear to those that listen carefully.

Palmistry Reading

Status


Type of Palm Reading
Specific Questions:



To Get an online Palm reading with Christopher, just take pictures of your hands and send them to advanceddivination@gmail.com. You can also send them through Facebook or even through the mail. It is also possible to send a scan of the hands by placing your palms over a scanner or printer.

Take Pictures of the front, back and sides of both hands. Different lighting  conditions and different angles of light help a lot too. Email them to advanceddivination@gmail.com. Be sure and give me your name and phone number and decide on a good time for me to call. This reading will be very detailed, so it would be best if it was recorded.

Any extra photographs can be very helpful in answering complex questions, for instance, if you wanted to know where you were born or something of that nature, it would helpful to have pictures of the bottoms of your feet, your face, profile and any curious moles, birthmarks and/or scars you might have.

A basic reading is 30 minutes long. It can be done in classic palmistry fashion or we can spend that time just looking at the present in order to resolve an issue or answer some questions.

A full palm reading is one hour long. It can entail both, the classic palm reading, as well as looking into specific issues.

A complete palm reading is every thing I can find out about you from your hands (or from any pictures that you send me). This can be over the phone or in written text form (as an essay), or both. This will also include an Astro-palmistry natal chart of the hand showing planetary signs.

A composite of any of the above readings can be customized as you like. If you are a student of palmistry, or if you are interested in understanding how I know what I know, I can draw out any specific detail in your hands along with explanations.

Also, you can Click this link to go to my Facebook page. Text me your information for free questions and readings. Any Information you share will remain private and can be used for future readings!

                                     back of left hand Right palm Baby's palm Left side Right and Left great palm Left side of hand

Readings usually occur over the phone, although, it is possible for an audio recorded reading to be sent to your email. For the complete reading, you will receive a text format sent to your email.

Legal Disclaimer: By agreeing to use the services of Advanced Palmistry you agree that you have read and understand that all information is subject to the service recipient’s interpretation.Advanced Palmistry will not be held accountable for any interpretations  or decisions made by recipients based on information provided during readings.These readings are for entertainment purposes only. All information and/or advice given to you by Advanced Palmistry should not take the place of any medical, legal or financial advice given to you by any qualified professional.  All sessions by Advanced Palmistry are not a substitute for medical, legal or financial advice.You must be 18 years of age to use this service, or have written consent from a parent or legal guardian. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

2016 EVENTS CALENDAR

Aside

⊕       2016       ⊕

CEREMONIAL EVENTS CALENDAR

Private Ceremonials are not listed on this calendar. 

We regularly add events and dates so check our calendar periodically or contact us before making plans. All events listed are public. If you would like more details or plan on attending events please email us at: conjurespirits@gmail.

January 2016

February 2016

SUNDAY 28: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

MONDAY 22: FULL MOON  PIPE CEREMONY, 7:00 PM.

March 2016

WEDNESDAY 23: FULL MOON  PIPE CEREMONY, 7:00 PM.

SUNDAY 27: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

April 2016

SATURDAY 16-26 San Diego California: Vision Quest, Yuwipi, Sweat Lodges and Tipi Meeting.

SUNDAY 24: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

May 2016

SATURDAY 21: FULL MOON  PIPE CEREMONY, 7:00 PM.

FRIDAY 20 – MONDAY 23: HANBLECEYA (VISION QUEST), SWEAT LODGES AT NOON EACH DAY FOLLOWED BY POTLUCKS.

SUNDAY 22: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

TUESDAY 24: ALL NIGHT TIPI MEETING

June 2016

Monday 6: Sun Dance, Tres Piedras NM. Tree day is the 6th, dance is 7-10.

Wednesday 15: Eagle and Condor Retreat with Camino do Amor, Bend Oregon.

Wednesday 22: Sun Dance, Moriarti NM. Purification starts on 19th, dance ends on 26th.

SUNDAY 26: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

July 2016

Wednesday 6: Canupa Ceremony, Glastonbury.

Thursday 7: Sweat Lodge Ceremony, Glastonbury.

Wednesday 13: Womans Sweat Lodge, Glastonbury.

TUESDAY 19: FULL MOON  PIPE CEREMONY, 7:00 PM.

SUNDAY 24: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

August 2016

MONDAY 15 TO THURSDAY 18: DREAM DANCE, DAILY SWEAT LODGES AND NIGHT DANCING

SUNDAY 28: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

September 2016

FRIDAY 16 – MONDAY 19: Hanbleceya (Vision Quest), Sweat Lodges at noon each day followed by pot luck.

SUNDAY 25: WOMEN’S SACRED CIRCLE, LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO 5:00 – 8:00 P.M.

October 2016

THURSDAY 13 – MONDAY 24: CEREMONIES, HURLEYVILLE, NEW YORK.

November 2016

 

December 2016


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The Foundation of a Culture

 

 

This speech was made at The University of Colorado for The National psychedelic symposium 2015. There is a growing concern that the scientific community and mainstream culture may overlook intrinsic details in regards to the use of Entheogens. In this speech Christopher covers some of the problems overlooked by our culture’s assumptions and the myopic reductionism of science. In addition to this, many people nowadays feel qualified to lead contemporary ceremonials using mind altering substances. In truth there are many very important reasons that traditionally, such qualifications are very strict. Traditional lineage and spiritual authority are the foundations here, two things carelessly dismissed by domestic society.

♥ Make a tax deductible donation ♥





Experiencia Espiritual

¿Alguna vez has sentido como si estuviera paralizado mientras se queda dormido? ¿Alguna vez has sentido un asimiento de la mano usted o levitando experimentado en tu cama? ¿ una extraña sensación de hormigueo que comenzó a cubrir su cuerpo? Ciertas personas en algún momento de viaje de la vida han experimentado ese contacto espiritual. La mayoría de la gente puede recordar tener una experiencia fuera del cuerpo o algún otro evento inexplicable. Una ocurrencia común es tener una fuerte sensación de que alguien está de pie a los pies de su cama o incluso ver a alguien allí. Además, la sensación de un que, el “toque de un guante de terciopelo” o un líquido oscuro gruesa como la sustancia que cubre su cuerpo. Si usted ha tenido este tipo de visitas que están bien preparados para ir más lejos o verdadero miedo o ambos!

Espíritus particulares trabajan con personas específicas, es la misión de estos espíritus para ayudar a aquellos que tienen el potencial de alcanzar la inmortalidad a través del mundo de los sueños. Estos espíritus tienen una relación simbiótica con los seres humanos que pueden ser mejoradas por nosotros entrenando para entrar en sus reinos. En otras palabras, esta idea religiosa entera de alcanzar el cielo y la inmortalidad es parte del plan de los creadores por el potencial del ser humano. Cuando uno tiene el potencial de este tipo de trabajo, el espíritu de la tierra y otros inmortales pondrá a prueba el aprendiz prospectivo. Esto puede ocurrir a través de tener sueños vuelan, los sueños lúcidos y otro fenómeno indescriptible.

Un gran problema tiene la gente con esta teoría es la pregunta de por qué el miedo juega un parte de este proceso. El miedo es visto como una fuerza negativa y, en general como una advertencia natural de peligro. El miedo es también un mecanismo de defensa es necesario, uno que se necesita para sobrevivir en el otro lado. De la misma manera que existe un peligro en este mundo, existen peligros y las fuerzas depredadoras en el camino de los otros mundos. Es común que los espíritus dejen de funcionar con un aprendiz que no se convierte en miedo. Un viajero alma con un no sano sentido del miedo no tiene valor de supervivencia en el otro lado. Los espíritus no entrenar a alguien que no tiene ningún sentido del miedo. Es crucial para un estudiante de viaje astral para poder detectar el peligro.

Este problema presenta una contradicción en la mente de muchos buscadores espirituales. La percepción del bien y el mal se confunde con otras cosas. La única verdadera fuerza del mal en el universo es la ignorancia humana. Luego hay cosas que son perjudiciales para nosotros, lo que es malo para nosotros. Los gatos son malos para los ratones, esto no significa que los gatos son malos. Algunos seres naturales y los animales son perjudiciales para nosotros aquí en este mundo, lo mismo en los otros reinos algunos seres pueden tratar de devorarnos. Estos seres no son diferentes de los depredadores terrestres. Estos seres son los mismos que los animales y son de otra manera inocente. Los tiburones que se alimentan de la gente no está mal, tienen hambre y es útil para nosotros tememos them.There hay fuerza organizada del mal que no sea la ignorancia de la humanidad.

Creo que el concepto del bien y el mal se produjo entre los místicos y magos del pasado. Era un código de conducta para la retención y el cultivo de la energía espiritual, algo que es esencial para el sueño lúcido y fuera de los viajes cuerpo. Uno puede ver fácilmente que la población de personas que las tierras ‘necesita desesperadamente un código de conducta ética, esto no tiene nada que ver con el antiguo arte de la ascensión espiritual y su hacer y no hacer de .

 





Moontime Details

The Singing Stone fully recognizes the extreme energy that women carry during Moontime. Divine Feminine physical manifestations of our Creator/Creatrix, our power is so great that we are capable of bringing forth new life. Because Moontime is such a powerful pull, we follow these traditional Lakota Ceremonies as they were passed to us and we do not allow mooning women to attend. The reason for this is because moontime energy would completely take over the intentions of the Medicine Man/Woman and people who put so much effort into creating a Ceremony with a specific purpose. As we have been guided by our teachers, women on their moontime may be present for All Night Peyote Meetings but would need to prepare 13 prayer ties around her waist with the intention to not interfere with the main intention. Ceremonies that consist of only women such as a sweat lodge and non traditional rituals would not include drums, feathers, sacred pipes, or any other sacred objects used in Indigenous Ceremonies for men and women.

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

Peyote Ceremony Details






This Ceremony will take place from 8 p.m. until sunup the next day. The location will be at The Singing Stone home in Crestone, Colorado at 1074 Lariat Trail. For directions visit our MAP. Participants may camp out before or after the Ceremony but be prepared as it is a rustic environment and our building still requires more work to be done. Participants may camp out before or after the Ceremony but be prepared as it is a rustic environment and our building still requires more work to be done. Please R.S.V.P. if you plan on attending this full night of prayer by emailing or calling.

Items to remember:

Potluck Dish (please let us know what you will be bringing)

Plate, bowl, cup, and utensils

Flashlight

Pillow

Blanket

Unopened package of tobacco for our Roadman

4 additional optional tobacco for officers

Dress in layers ready for either hot or cold conditions. This is an appropriate time to dress as we would want the Creator to see us. Women must wear a skirt and a shawl is part of this tradition as well. Men should consider wearing a dress shirt. Women, if it is your Moon Time (menses) then please let us know with plenty of time beforehand to make preparations.

We welcome all to attend so please speak with us if you are unable to donate and if you are willing to offer your assistance with work that is needed for our Church. We have to purchase this medicine so some kind of exchange is essential for us to continue offering these ceremonies. This also helps the flow for you or others to potentially experience a manifestation of prayers by maintaining this healthy balance in the universe.

Please call or email with any questions and plan to arrive in Crestone before 8 p.m. We look forward to a beautiful evening in prayer together as we celebrate the fullness and joy of summer. Mitakuye Oyasin!

All Night Tipi Meeting Preparations

This is a time to appear as we would like to be seen by our Creator, Wakan Tanka, or God. Women, this is a nice time to wear a dress or a skirt and shawl. If it is your moon time please let us know and and we will make the proper arrangements. Bring an extra towel and change of clothing if needed for the sweat lodge in case we have one. Some people fast before the ritual but we do not advise this. Avoiding excessive salt the day of can help. If you are Alcoholic, clean out fully as the spirits of the medicine don’t like those kind of ”spirits”.  This ancient ritual will take place in a tipi so please be prepared for hot or cold conditions. Bring a flashlight, blankets,  and a potluck dish to pass for the Ceremonial feast to follow the Meeting.

 We do not allow pets, alcohol, or drugs on the premise. Before arriving it is also helpful to start thinking about what areas in your life are needing attention in order to project those prayers clearly.

Picture 001singing andrea and Chris

In our lineage, an unopened package of tobacco is traditionally offered to the Roadman. We could use help leading up to the Meeting and especially the day of. Please contact us to offer your service in the ways that are best suited. We do not charge for any Ceremonies. If an individual is in great need of help, they will not be turned away because they are unable to make a donation. Putting energy forth through donations of any sort is a balanced way to walk in this world. There are many ways that your donations help to make these Ceremonies flow and for that we are grateful. Medicine must be purchased for this type of Ceremony as well as firewood, Sacred foods, and many other things.

  •  If you bring your children to a ceremony please understand that Federal law prohibits minors from ingesting peyote.
  • If you suffer from Schizophrenia you can expect a safe episode free experience. Peyote does not interfere with medications associated with Schizophrenia either. 
  • Persons regularly using Alcohol and other narcotics will find their experience to be one of discomfort.
  • Federal employees (including military) are federally protected from discrimination as members.
  • If your conscience is burdened with guilt or regret, you may become aware of why you have those feelings.
  • Know too that Peyote is not a cure all, it is the sacrament in a prayer meeting in which we rely upon our prayers to enlist a healing.
  • Also a Native American Church meeting need not include the sacred sacrament of the herb Peyote!

 

Moontime Details

The Singing Stone fully recognizes the extreme energy that women carry during Moontime. Divine Feminine physical manifestations of our Creator/Creatrix, our power is so great that we are capable of bringing forth new life. Because Moontime is such a powerful pull, we follow these traditional Lakota Ceremonies as they were passed to us and we do not allow mooning women to attend. The reason for this is because moontime energy would completely take over the intentions of the Medicine Man/Woman and people who put so much effort into creating a Ceremony with a specific purpose. As we have been guided by our teachers, women on their moontime may be present for All Night Peyote Meetings but would need to prepare 13 prayer ties around her waist with the intention to not interfere with the main intention. Ceremonies that consist of only women such as a sweat lodge and non traditional rituals would not include drums, feathers, sacred pipes, or any other sacred objects used in Indigenous Ceremonies for men and women.

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short is needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

Vision Quest Supporter Details

Vision Quest Supporter Details

Make a tax deductible donation.


Hanbleceya (Vision Quest) is an amazing opportunity to join together in community supporting our Relatives who are out for Vision Quest. We will be praying for them every day with a continuous fire burning. Taking turns tending this fire as well as attending sweat lodges around noon every day, it is sure to be an experience to change your life if you have not experienced this sacred Ceremony as a supporter. We will also be singing traditional songs daily to connect with the Spirits and one another.

When we enter the first sweat lodge to place the questers out, everyone is aware to keep their voices to a minimum and to avoid any physical contact with them. As supporters it is imperative that we are maintaining a positive spiritual focus around the camp. This is not a time to engage in gossip or other inappropriate behavior. It is understood that those going out for Hanbleceya understand that there is a possibility that they may never return. They are making a sacrifice to receive what is needed to live in a good way with all relations at this time. We must not forget to be reverent towards this serious Ceremony and give as much as possible.


 

If you would like to be a supporter for the vision quest we would need help tending the fire and in the kitchen. The fire is attended to constantly so we would have to do it in shifts. We will be singing songs and praying. Supporters would be involved in the sweat lodges and in the actual bringing the quest-er to and from the Hocoka. Women are to wear skirts or dresses while on the premise.

Supporting for a ceremony like this can be very empowering and profound. It is an opportunity to learn more about these ways and is a prerequisite to preforming Hanbleceya. If you want to support someone who is doing the vision quest and you are unable to attend, you can do so at home. Some find it helpful to keep a candle lit to remember that people are out there and to connect with the sweat lodge fire. Food and water may be put out for the spirits as well as fasting yourself. Supporting a Hanbleceya is not complete without singing!!!

Moontime Details

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

Hanbleceya List

The Singing Stone

Hanbleceya List

www.thesingingstone.com conjurespirits@gmail.com

719-256-5307 719-937-1331

Click here to download: Hanbleceya List

We welcome those interested in going out for vision quest to present tobacco or a loaded pipe to the Medicine Man. Please have a clear intention in regards to the number of days that you would like to be sequestered. Anyone interested in going on the hill must have supported at least one time. We also ask that you assist with wood preparations beforehand. You must supply prepared food, snacks, and/or any other meal items or monetary donations to feed supporters. It is helpful if you have two people to be your “helpers”. If this is not possible then a supporter(s) will be designated to assist you when you go out as well as when you return. Please arrive one or two days prior to the date to be planted. Below is a list of materials needed for Vision Quest.

Large amount of loose tobacco

  1. Fabric for 405 prayer ties (1” apart) in this order around a ball of sage on a continuous string:

    - 5 in colors of your choice of blue, green, and/or purple (small amount of fabric)

    - 100 white (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 yellow (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 red (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 black (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

  2. Fabric (¼ yard each)

    - Black, red, yellow, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, & purple for flags

         – red felt for waluta

         – red for wrapping items

  1. One new star quilt, Pendleton blanket, or animal hide to give away 

  2. One personal blanket

  3. One new knife (cheap/expensive/your choice)

  4. One Pipe (corn husk tobacco may be provided)

  5. One new metal bucket to give away

  6. One new metal dipper to give away

  7. Medicine Wheel

  8. Shell Button

  9. Sweetgrass braid

  10. Sage (one armload may be collected or purchased)

  11. One special feather

  12. Six Chokecherry sticks collected in woods cut to one yard and pointed prior to Hanbleceya

  13. Attire: – Men wear shorts and a good pair of shoes – Women wear a cotton dress, shawl, if desired, and a good pair of shoes

  14. Feast for supporters for after Hanbleceya

  15. Personal food/drink for after

  16. Optional Giveaway for supporters

The Singing Stone has some items available for purchase such as metal dippers, higher quality metal buckets, sweet grass braids, medicine wheels, and shells. Bucket and dipper may be purchased at Big R arriving north in Conifer 303-816-7124. From south in Alamosa 719-587-0435. Orr’s Trading Company in Englewood, Colorado (near Denver) has shells buttons, quill work medicine wheels, and other items that you may need. They are at 303-722-6466.

To do the vision quest one would need to make the tobacco prayer ties. The 405 prayer ties are offerings for the 405 spirits of the Earth (Wasicun pi). The spirits that come will inspect each one ( they may not all come ).  The ties are also a protective device, in that only the 405 spirit may enter. Usually we use just basic cotton fabric. Normally the 405 ties are red but colors can vary depending on the situation. Be sure and contact us about this important detail. The fabric is cut into 2 inch squares.

The string to use may be yarn, kite string, or sinew (waxed nylon). A tiny pinch of tobacco is placed into a cloth square, using two slip knots, the bundle is tied without cutting the string. Keep the prayer ties an inch apart. You should only be praying while you do this, nothing else. It is nice to smudge the prayer ties each time you sit down to work on them. The ties should be rolled onto a small wad of sage as you go along, sort of like rolling a ball of yarn. They can be made in stages or all at once. Be sure the string will be long enough, pieces of string cannot be tied together. So make sure you wind up with one continuous line of 405 prayer ties 1 inch apart.

You will also need to make prayer flags, also known as robes. You will need 1/4 yard of red, yellow, black, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, and lavender. These should be new basic cotton. Also you will need 1/4 yard of red felt of any kind. A small hand full of tobacco is placed into the corner of the fabric and tied into a bundle with string. Each flag will be separate but make sure you leave about 7 inches of string  on either side of the bundle to tie these to sticks later.

Just before vision quest we will take a short hike to gather fresh sage and five forked sticks either chokecherry or juniper. The prayer flags will be tied to these just before the sweat lodge. The sage will be laid out upon the ground within the Hocoka.

For the red felt prayer flag (waluta) you will also need a shell button, a medicine wheel disc decorated with porcupine quills, and a special feather. These will be tied to the bundle in that order. Please contact us if you cannot find some of these supplies.

A metal bucket with a dipper and a plain knife will be needed. An extra quarter yard of red basic cotton fabric will be used to wrap all of these things with sage. All of the items used in the vision quest must be new and unused. You will need a new star quilt or a Pendleton blanket or a buffalo hide. Everything that has been mentioned so far will be given away afterwards, except the sage, which can be used throughout the year as smudge incense. An extra blanket should be brought. This can be a used blanket of any kind that you will not give away.

The most important item for the vision quest is the sacred canupa or sacred pipe. Those people who carry a canupa will use their own. We will provide a pipe (on loan) to those who do not have one. Like the bucket, dipper, and knife, their handles will be wrapped in sage with the extra red fabric.

During the Vision Quest, if you need to use the “bathroom” you will place your sweetgrass braid over the prayer tie string. You will step over the braid outside of the hocoka use the “bathroom” and step back over the sweetgrass braid into the hocoka and remove the sweetgrass braid from the prayer tie string. To avoid all this one should fast from solid foods one or two days before going up on the hill.

In the event of the menses unexpectedly occurring while questing, a woman then is led away from the sequestered area and will be taken to the Moon Lodge. The ceremony ends for her then and can resume at a later date.( We will know if  the Moontime begins ).

Appropriate attire for this event for men is a pair of shorts or underwear. Ladies wear a simple cotton dress. We have sweat dresses and all of the necessary ceremonial equipment available.

Anyone participating in the vision quest would be responsible for providing a feast for all of the supporters. In some cases one would give gifts to all of the supporters as well. Contact us for more details in regards to this. Some of the foods for this are specific and would have to be prepared during the Ceremony. A few groceries to feed some of the supporters are necessary as well (they will participate in a light fast).

Moontime Details

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

 

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Yuwipi Details

 A Yuwipi Ceremony is known as a Night Sing. Invocation songs are sung in a darkened room to call upon the help of woodland spirits. Fairies, little people, stone spirits, and animals arrive creating an almost indescribable situation. This ritual is a profound experience of spiritual beings manifesting into the physical.

If you are planning to attend a Yuwip\Lowanpi, there are some details that must be mentioned. Women who do attend must be fully clothed covering shoulders and knees. It is traditional for women to wear a shawl. Men dress casually but we do require shirts to be worn even if it is hot in the space. No shiny objects or electronics are allowed (cell phones, watches, or jewelry). Persons wearing a pacemaker should not attend. Once the door is shut no one may enter the Ceremony late so if you arrive after we begin, you will have to attend a future Ceremony and come on time. Children are welcome to attend and usually fall asleep so blankets and pillows are helpful. Participants may bring a pillow or blanket to sit on as well. There will be no bathroom breaks so try not to drink large amounts of liquid before the Ceremony. It is best to be open to the Spirits reaching out to us but we are encouraged not to reach out to them. If participants know these specific songs then they may sing along or hum along but we do ask to refrain from creating songs or sounds that do not belong in this Ceremony. There will be a pipe that is passed around that does not contain tobacco but consists of local herbs. It is not mandatory to smoke the Pipe and simply may be a blessing each person may take for one’s self.. This experience is one to never forget. We encourage all in need of a healing to attend as well as to mention this rare Ceremonial to those who may benefit.

 

Moontime Details

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

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Reclaiming our Moon Lodge

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As our Grandmothers have done since before recorded history, we the women enter into our own Ceremony each month. Flesh and blood, these physical manifestations of Spirit have the incredible capability to give life. Not to be taken for granted, moon time (menstruation) is a special time when our power is so great that our energy may inadvertently take over other Ceremonies. One egg dies each month while a cleansing of our bodies, minds, spirits, and emotions prepares us for yet another cycle. The womb of creation resides within each woman whether we choose to give birth or not. Cycles continue in the circle of life regardless of where we come from or how we live our lives.

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Are we aware of this power that naturally unfolds as we enter once again into our dark inward phase each month? It is our responsibility to learn what it means to be gifted these incarnations as women reclaiming our Moon Lodge. How do we do this? The answer is simple but seemingly difficult for our domestically trained minds in an increasingly technological time. We are living in a male dominated culture when production, efficiency, science, and reason are the focus. Feminine qualities which were once revered such as intuition, receptivity, and artistic expression are now viewed as a waste of time, frivolous, and lazy. While mother qualities are encouraged such as cooking, cleaning, and caring for our children, a balance is needed for us to have the energy to lovingly nurture others. Moon Lodge is a space where we can retreat from all responsibilities. Moon time is just 4 days out of each month when we, the women may recharge so that we are strong and empowered, ready to fulfill each of our specific life purposes while caring for our families in a joyful manner.

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Regardless of the cycles taking place in our outer world, we must be aware of and honor our own cycles. Together we support one another while welcoming a return of this sacred space. Let’s turn off our cell phones, quiet our busy minds, retreat to our Moon Lodge, and listen to what the Spirits are telling us. In native teachings, spirit is in everything. We can keep trying to find that teacher or book but it all resides within each of us. The universe is one and the same whether it be from the Spirit in the from of a clear understanding in that “Aha” moment or in the form of a direct feeling from a tree or stone. During the dark phase of our moon cycle, when we are bleeding, women are even more receptive so it is extremely important for us to calm our minds and listen to the messages that we need to hear in order to help ourselves as well as our relations. This is a good time to pay particular attention to our dreams and write in a journal so that we can reflect on them later. When we are mooning it is an opportunity to pray for anyone that we might feel needs help. From deep within ourselves we may develop or give birth to something new and we are in tune with an inner knowing of what is and is not working in our lives. As the moon surrenders her light, women follow her example and prepare to shed their blood, retreating into the Moon Lodge to rest, reflect, and gather wisdom.

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Why do we call it moon time? The tides of the waters are regulated by Grandmother Moon and she watches over all the waters of the Earth. Just as Grandmother Moon watches over the waters of the Earth, women watch over the waters of the people. Feminine waters are always first followed by new life. The moon cycle is a gift to the women and we are especially close to Grandmother Moon because she governs the woman’s cleansing cycle. Second only to the ability of the Great Spirit to give new life, it is considered a time of extreme power. Some traditions believe that when women are on their moon time, the Creator comes closer to them. It is interesting to note that in the newer patriarchal religions the moon is seen as a dark satellite and bringer of negativity whereas in the older traditions of the Earth, the moon has always been seen as a life giving force.

teepee used for the peyote ceremony

Not to be crossed with the masculine fire element, moon energy is cool and feminine. In general, women pray with water (moon) while men pray with fire (sun). A ceremony of men and non mooning women centering around a fire might be simultaneously taking place with a circle of mooning women nearby. It is the responsibility of women to focus on the water instead of the fire as an additional fire burning with mooning women could be extremely dangerous. An unnatural increase in the flow of blood by the women in the Moon Lodge could occur. Another outcome could be that the energy of mooning women could completely take over the efforts of participants in the other ceremony which is counterproductive. Many ceremonies include men, women, and children but when it comes to subjects concerning women, it is meant only for women while discussions around men are meant only for men.

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To understand the extreme power that exists during moon time as well as reverence for this influential energy, we can go back in time and explore cultures from around the world. All indigenous traditions would agree that a mooning woman’s energy could overpower a Ceremony and would encourage seclusion for any woman who is menstruating. From a Native American perspective, a woman who is on her moon time that is not being responsible can be detrimental to the entire tribe. It was believed that menstrual blood could interfere with the power that men needed for hunting. Because this energy is associated with the positive forces of life, it could overwhelm their power to kill. Hunters were instructed not to walk near a menstruating woman or to swim downstream from where she bathed. There is a mystical connection that is thought to exist between the blood of a mooning woman, the essence of life, and that of game. This would keep a tribe from acquiring the necessary food for survival. In Hinduism, moon time is recognized as such an essential cleansing of toxins (ama) and metabolic wastes that women are believed to outlive men. Apana vayu is an aspect responsible for the circulation and physical movement of energy, wastes materials and fluids down and out of the body. This is an excerpt from the Old Testament in Leviticus 15:19, part of Semitic mythology, “When a woman has her regular flow of blood, the impurity of her monthly period will last seven days, and anyone who touches her will be unclean until evening.”In Bali, a woman is not allowed to enter the kitchen to perform her usual duties, nor is she allowed to have sex with her husband while menstruating. She is to sleep apart from the family and has to keep her clothes that she wears while menstruating away from any clothes that she could wear to the temple.

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This small handful of examples from various parts of our world reveals the importance of this part of a woman’s cycle. Something to consider interesting about the times we are living in now is how little this sacred moon time is actually recognized and respected. Could it be that secluding women during menstruation is inconvenient? Would a lack of attendees in Church interfere with the overall amount of money given? Is our present culture so repressed and confused that there is literally no acknowledgment? Are we just incredibly lazy? How could it be that women still continue to keep going like this?

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On a practical level, we all need to make an effort to truly honor moon time by making some steps to change the recurring pattern of it being “just another day” and “just another moon time”. Not a time to be spent on the mundane of daily household chores, the veil between worlds is thin and is best spent in solitude or in a small group. Ideally we would have a house or room to return to each month that is clean, cozy, and accessible to rest and relax in. This is not always feasible so it is important for us to communicate with our families and friends about how important it is for everyone to acknowledge and respect this woman’s time. Perhaps, until this “space” is created we need to hang in there and with gentle assertiveness insist on some changes taking place in the home. Planning ahead helps so that when it is time to retreat, there is food prepared in the freezer or others in the house know that we are not responsible for everyone’s needs. What about the women taking turns feeding each other, doing laundry, watching kids, or other chores? Also, we each need to make this quiet time happen. Even if it is just for an hour, it is a start. It is perfectly O.K. to say no sometimes and we do not need to feel guilty for doing this. If we are routinely caring for ourselves then we will naturally have an inward peace that emanates from our being. The feeling of lack and overwhelm will be a thing of the past and then we have the energy to give to others.

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We pray for our sons, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, uncles, and nephews as well as for our feminine counterparts so that things can be brought back into balance. There is no time to dwell on the dysfunction of our world that we have collectively created. It is time to honestly look at ourselves and make changes where it is needed. The time of separation between women is over. Now we must, once again, connect with our fellow Queen Goddesses and create our Sacred Moon Lodge Temples. We are muske, sisters dancing together as we always have been.

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Spiritual Experience

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Have you ever felt like you were paralyzed while falling asleep? Have you ever felt a hand grasp you or experienced levitating over your bed ? How about a strange tingling sensation that began covering your body? Certain people at some point in life’s journey have experienced such spiritual contact. Most people can recall having an out of body experience or some other unexplainable event. A common occurrence is having a strong sensation that someone is standing at the foot of your bed or even seeing someone there. Also, feeling a hand grab you, the “touch of a velvet glove” or a thick dark liquid like substance covering your body. If you have had such visitations you are either ready to take it further or real scared or both!

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Particular spirits work with specific people, it is the mission of these spirits to help those who have the potential of attaining Immortality through the dream world. These spirits have a symbiotic relationship with humans that can be enhanced by training us to enter their realms. In other words this whole religious idea of attaining heaven and immortality is part of the creators plan for human’s potential. When one has the potential for such work, the spirit of the earth and other immortals will test the prospective apprentice. This can happen through having flying dreams, lucid dreams and other indescribable phenomenon.

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A big issue people have with this theory is the question of why fear plays a part of this process. Fear is seen as a negative force and generally as a natural warning of danger. Fear is also a necessary defense mechanism, one that is needed in order to survive on the other side. In the same way that danger exists in this world, dangers and predatory forces exist on the path to the other worlds. It is common for the spirits to stop working with an apprentice who becomes fearless. A soul traveler with out a healthy sense of fear has no survival value on the other side. The spirits will not train someone who has no sense of fear. It is crucial for a student of astral travel to be able to detect danger.

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Japan’s Ainu Bear Ceremony

This issue presents a contradiction in the minds of many spiritual seekers. The perception of good and evil is confused with other things. The only true force of evil in the universe is human ignorance. Then there are things that are harmful to us, things that are bad for us. Cats are bad for mice, this does not mean that cats are evil. Some natural beings and animals are harmful to us here in this world, likewise in the other realms some beings may seek to devour us. These beings are no different than earthly predators. These beings are the same as animals and are otherwise innocent. Sharks that eat people are not evil, they are hungry and it is useful for us to fear them.There is no organized force of evil other than the ignorance of mankind.

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I think the concept of good and evil came about among the mystics and magicians of the past. It was a code of conduct for retaining and cultivating spiritual energy, something that is essential for lucid dreaming and out of body travel. One can easily see that the earths’ population of people desperately needs a code of ethical conduct, this has nothing to do with the ancient art of spiritual assention and it’s do’s and don’t’s.

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One of the greatest spiritual tests that can confront a prospective immortal is if you are shown some thing so wonderful, like a physical teleportation through a dream, will you seek to duplicate the experience? Oftentimes things are done to us to make us seek, call it inspiration. A person can be taken out of their body and shown how to fly. Such an experience is comparable to a baby having a dream of walking. We learn to walk in this life, walking is a useful tool after you have past through the veil of this world, flying is even more useful. Everything we learn in this life can be thought of as tools for the afterlife.

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Far more valuable than flying or sensing danger is the act of sustaining a lucid dream and maintaining the dream. The art of sustaining the energy of a dream is the cornerstone of physical immortality. In order to preform such a task one needs perceptual energy otherwise known as detachment, will, motivation, a sense of purpose and unshakable determination. In the early stages of dream work a person is usually tested to see if they know weather or not they are dreaming. To be aware that you are dreaming is the first step of consciously dreaming.

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This is a type of dream you are experiencing now. To put the same attention to your sleeping dreams as your awake life is paramount to walking into another dimension. The problem arises in the dream world is that we tend to return to this world, or wake up. The significance of sustaining and maintaining a dream is that you could conceivably do so indefinitely. Another facet of this process is the concept of blending the dream world with the awake world. If you can fly in a lucid dream, you can conceivably merge the dream world with the awake world and fly here. This is the key to magic, the miraculous.

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For thousands of years people have been known to be able to preform miraculous deeds, turning into animals, flying across the sky on a broom or on a flying carpet. Oftentimes these acts were performed with the aid of mind altering substances. Things that meld the dream and reality together in such a way that they are indistinguishable from “reality”. Perception is what we sustain our life’s reality with. We “are” because we are aware. It is perception which upholds this reality as well as the dream. If you put your attention on science and it’s reductionist assumptions you will likewise fall into it’s limitations.

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Obviously any substance which acts upon the human body in such a way is of little use to those who seek to survive beyond the physical body. Such substances have served ancient seekers and modern alike to break through perceptual boundary’s. Such things are counterproductive when they become indispensable and can damage one’s ability to sustain a dream’s energy. Controlled substances use dream energy, they are catalysts for our existing energy, not sources of energy. Your ability to naturally sustain awareness in a dream depends largely upon the amount of potential energy given to you through your parents act of conception during copulation. The key to proper spiritual cultivation is a sense of aspiration, an uplifting sense of beauty and celestial spender. To seek to emulate the heavens, symmetry and order. In essence this is the act of forming alliances with the divine, making friends of angels.

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This process is no different from how you make good friends here on earth. By showing charity, having faith, by always having hope, being strong, by practicing moderation, being just and by being a balanced person. What impresses angelic beings the most is to aspire to the point of defying the boundaries of this reality. It’s impressive when someone wins an Olympic medal, a lot of people will be attracted to you for such an achievement. Similarly, in the spiritual realm, a meditation feat of Olympic proportions will impress the gods and goddesses and may enlist their help. Meditation, austerity and self sacrifice can be seen as as a way of proving yourself more than the means to go beyond this reality. A magician who walks through walls does so with the help of spirits. A yogi mystic who can levitate does not do so under his own steam, these things are done with the help of friends.

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It is of utmost importance to avoid being judgmental. We should discern by having healthy boundaries. We should not be in judgement of anyone practicing magic of any form, for at this point in human history, it is far better for a person to overcome the limitations of reason than to remain in the darkness and ignorance of the mundane. As was mentioned earlier in this article, true evil is the dismal ignorance of mankind and the disbelief that we possess a spirit. It is they who are lost. Witchcraft and sorcery can no longer be classified as unproductive. Especially if it may lead to some form of liberation no matter how crude, such things are on the brink of extinction! It seems we are on the verge of becoming a race of atheistic zombies.

What tools does an atheist have for the afterlife? There is the knowledge of walking, of moving about and that is real important. It seems that most atheists stay put after their demise. This results in metaphysical entropy, the breaking down of the soul and the losing of ones will. With out the will, the soul becomes a ghost, a spiritual zombie, such beings, without receiving attention, will eventually stop moving entirely.

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If you experience a shockingly vivid experience in dreams or between dreams, take full advantage the moment! If some force grabs you in the night let it take you. Don’t feel shame in your fear of the unknown, bask in it. Strive with all your might to overcome the fate of the unbeliever. Reach out to god, to rise above the limitations of the profane and fly to the heavenly realms.

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Children

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Children are sacred and are exempt from all religious rules and dogma. No one should put ever put religion or spirituality before children. Contrary to a lot of faiths, we should strive to see the divine through the children and never compromise their comfort for our spiritual indulgence. Children should contribute to religion through their example of connection to nature and with their innocent spirit. We the adults have much to learn from the spontaneity and honesty of kids, especially in terms of the unknown realms of the spirit.

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Children should not be forced to endure any kind of indoctrination or molestation of any kind. Kids should not be taught about religion of any kind, they should be entertained through stories and songs. They should be taught about nature, plants and animals, the natural world. Especially in the city it is important to talk about nature and how, for thousands of years, people lived. If a kid asks you what you believe then you should tell them. If they reply in some coy or irreverent way, consider their wisdom carefully. The children’s reaction to dogma may provide valuable clues to the truths of the spiritual path.

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Have fun with kids and don’t impose any belief structure upon any of them. It is our job as parents to protect their sanctity and to learn from them. If we indoctrinate them into a faith they may never have the chance to accept a better path when it does come along. Teach them to keep an open mind while at the same time questioning authority. They should rely on their own impressions of divinity from within their own hearts. It is more valuable that they be inquisitive than faithful. It is better for them to freely doubt than to blindly trust and that goes for us adults as well.

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Warn the children of danger, tell them the difference between the divine and human traditions. In terms of spirituality tell them to rely upon natures’ instruction rather than peoples instruction. You can explain why things are done a certain way but do not suppose that any book or persons teaching is above the creations’ wisdom. Do not assume that your child shares your spiritual tendency. Not every one is destined to walk the Red Road (spiritual path), but know that all our interactions with children is a divinely guided test. They are here to remind us of the truth and innocence that is inherent in the creation, especially before we, as adults, judge and label it.

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Our church is dedicated to to the free minds of our children. If they think what we do is silly, then we should find out why, they may be able to enlighten us! Too many children miss out on being kids because their parents were too busy with religious obligations. An adults’ belief in no holidays should not be imposed upon their children. Kids should not have to wait in the car while their parents preach from door to door. As spiritual people we must understand that the children are a divine blessing to us and we should never compromise their attention or safety for our spiritual practice. If you have children of your own, you have been bestowed with a divine mission. Children are the spiritual path of parents. Do not neglect the path that the creation has given you, instead, celebrate them as the keys to your spiritual affluence.

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The young ones are closer to the other side just as the elders are. they have a sacred perspective and sacred position in life. Some old habits and attitudes fall away from a person when he or she becomes the elder and wisdom is born. With the child no old habits or patterns are really there, so we can see another type of wisdom known as innocence. In our way of life the child and elder both are exempt of ritual protocol and rules. If the elders or children begin to express discomfort in ceremony we fix the problem, even if we have to skip that part of the ritual.ccsCCS

In Indigenous Culture there exists many different denominations, things are done a little bit differently everywhere. We are child oriented. At a community feast, some feed the leaders and elders first, we feed the children first. If a baby decides to crawl across the altar, we let them, It is a sacred and profound act to us. If an elders’ speech goes unheard because a baby is crying loudly, we will contemplate the deeper significance of this. The divinitory meanings, omens and divine humor that children add to the ceremonies overrides that of the leaders in a purely magical way. Children are pure magic and even in seemingly irreverent acts, they always bring spirituality into better focus.

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Ritual abuse is a serious problem in all cultures. It should be our responsibility as mature adults to grant them the dignity of freedom of choice in spiritual matters. In Indigenous American culture we must rely upon nature for direction, not books. It is important that we get instruction from spiritually advanced teachers, but trust above them what your divine parents show you. Your Mother Earth and Father Sky know much about what is right for you than any spiritual leader. A spiritual leader with integrity will give you the freedom to see the truth for your self and should be mature enough to know that you may receive a different message. In these ways we hear our elders and consider what they say, but do not assume that they are the absolute truth.kids!

NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH – Higher Court Rulings

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NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH – Higher Court Rulings 

 

CENTRO ESPIRITA BENEFICENTE UNIAO DO VEGETAL (UDV) v. UNITED STATES – Unanimous Ruling, November 1, 2005

“The Supreme Court heard oral arguments November 1, 2005, and issued its opinion February 21, 2006, finding that the Government failed to meet its burden under RFRA that barring the substance served a compelling government interest.”

“The court also disagreed with the government’s central argument that the uniform application of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) does not allow for exceptions for the substance in this case, as Native Americans  are given exceptions to use Peyote, another Schedule I substance

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STATE OF UTAH SUPREME COURT UNANIMOUS RULING, June 22, 2004 – State of Utah v. James W. Mooney, aka James W.B.E. Mooney, Linda T. Mooney, and Oklevueha Earthwalks Native American Church of Utah, Inc.,  

“2 We therefore rule that the exemption is available to all members of the Native American Church

“We hold that the federal Religious Peyote Exemption found at 21 C.F.R. 1307.31 has been incorporated into the Utah Controlled Substances Act” 

“On its face, the federal regulation does not restrict the exemption to members of federally recognized tribes. We therefore rule that the exemption is available to all members of the Native American Church

______________________

UNITED STATES ATTORNEY GENERAL OFFICE – Memorandum to the Drug Enforcement Administration – 12/07/2000  

“Our research has identified no religious organizations, other than the NAC, which would qualify for the exemption under these or similar procedural and substantive requirements.  It seems unlikely, therefore, that in practice the peyote exemption need be expanded beyond an exemption for the NAC.” 

“If, however, a group does appear which can establish that it is a bona fide religion in which the actual use of peyote is central to established religious beliefs, practices, dogmas, or rituals, your agency is obligated to accord it the exemption under the current statutory scheme.”

______________________

UNITED STATES TENTH FEDERAL CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS UNANIMOUS RULING, May 10, 1990 – United States v Robert Boyll
 
Nowhere is it even suggested that the exemption applies only to Indian members of the Native American Church.  Had the intention been to exclude non-Indian members, as the United States argues, the language of the exemption would have so clearly provided.  Indeed, the federal peyote exemption makes no reference whatsoever to a racial exclusion”  
“The District Court, Burciaga, Chief Judge, held that: (1) permitting Indians’ non-drug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of Native American church, but prohibiting such use by non-Indians, would violate free exercise and equal protection clauses; (2) compelling interest test applied to free exercise challenge to prosecution of non-Indian member, and (3) prosecution would violate free exercise clause. Motions granted..

 

 

CONSEQUENCES FOR VIOLATING THE CIVIL LIBERTIES OF FUEGO SAGRADO DE ITZACHILATLAN OF COLORADO NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH OR IT’S MEMBERS.

CONSEQUENCES FOR VIOLATING THE CIVIL LIBERTIES OF Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan of Colorado NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH or it’s MEMBERs.

 

F.S.I.C. Corp official Seal

F.S.I.C. Corp official Seal

Federal, State and Local Law Enforcement Officers, Mayors, Council persons, Judges, Nursing Home Proprietors, Security Guards, etc. The named bearer of a FUEGO SAGRADO DE ITZACHILATLAN OF COLORADO Member has specific rights under the Titles below. Violation of those rights carries penalties as described. We honor you in your efforts to enforce Constitutional Law and offer this in a desire to help you in your responsibilities to do so.

Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241
This statute makes it unlawful for two or more persons to conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any person of any state, territory or district in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him/her by the Constitution or the laws of the United States, (or because of his/her having exercised the same).

It further makes it unlawful for two or more persons to go in disguise on the highway or on the premises of another with the intent to prevent or hinder his/her free exercise or enjoyment of any rights so secured. 

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to ten years, or both; and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years, or for life, or may be sentenced to death.


Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law
Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242
This statute makes it a crime for any person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom to willfully deprive or cause to be deprived from any person those rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution and laws of the U.S.

This law further prohibits a person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation or custom to willfully subject or cause to be subjected any person to different punishments, pains, or penalties, than those prescribed for punishment of citizens on account of such person being an alien or by reason of his/her color or race. 

Acts under “color of any law” include acts not only done by federal, state, or local officials within the bounds or limits of their lawful authority, but also acts done without and beyond the bounds of their lawful authority; provided that, in order for unlawful acts of any official to be done under “color of any law,” the unlawful acts must be done while such official is purporting or pretending to act in the performance of his/her official duties. This definition includes, in addition to law enforcement officials, individuals such as Mayors, Council persons, Judges, Nursing Home Proprietors, Security Guards, etc., persons who are bound by laws, statutes ordinances, or customs.

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to one year, or both, and if bodily injury results or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined or imprisoned up to ten years or both, and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.


      Tax deductible

18 USC CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS

CITE-    18 USC CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS                            01/03/2012 (112-90) –

EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES

CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-

CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS                      -MISC1-    Sec.

241.        Conspiracy against rights.

242.        Deprivation of rights under color of law.

243.        Exclusion of jurors on account of race or color.

244.        Discrimination against person wearing uniform of armed                 forces.

245.        Federally protected activities.

246.        Deprivation of relief benefits.

247.        Damage to religious property; obstruction of persons                 in the free exercise of religious beliefs.

248.        Freedom of access to clinic entrances.

249.        Hate crime acts.

AMENDMENTS

2009 – Pub. L. 111-84, div. E, Sec. 4707(b), Oct. 28, 2009, 123    Stat. 2841, added item 249.

1994 – Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, Sec. 330023(a)(1), Sept.    13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2150, substituted “Freedom of access to clinic    entrances” for “Blocking access to reproductive health services” in    item 248.      Pub. L. 103-259, Sec. 4, May 26, 1994, 108 Stat. 697, added item    248.

1988 – Pub. L. 100-690, title VII, Sec. 7018(b)(2), Nov. 18,    1988, 102 Stat. 4396, struck out “of citizens” after “rights” in    item 241.      Pub. L. 100-346, Sec. 3, June 24, 1988, 102 Stat. 645, added item    247.

1976 – Pub. L. 94-453, Sec. 4(b), Oct. 2, 1976, 90 Stat. 1517,    added item 246.      1968 – Pub. L. 90-284, title I, Sec. 102, Apr. 11, 1968, 82 Stat.    75, added item 245. -End-   -CITE-

18 USC Sec. 241                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) –

EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES

CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 241. Conspiracy against rights -STATUTE-      If two or more persons conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or    intimidate any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth,    Possession, or District in the free exercise or enjoyment of any    right or privilege secured to him by the Constitution or laws of    the United States, or because of his having so exercised the same; or If two or more persons go in disguise on the highway, or on the    premises of another, with intent to prevent or hinder his free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege so secured – They shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in    violation of this section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, they shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years or for life,    or both, or may be sentenced to death. -SOURCE-    (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 696; Pub. L. 90-284, title I,    Sec. 103(a), Apr. 11, 1968, 82 Stat. 75; Pub. L. 100-690, title    VII, Sec. 7018(a), (b)(1), Nov. 18, 1988, 102 Stat. 4396; Pub. L.    103-322, title VI, Sec. 60006(a), title XXXII, Secs. 320103(a),    320201(a), title XXXIII, Sec. 330016(1)(L), Sept. 13, 1994, 108    Stat. 1970, 2109, 2113, 2147; Pub. L. 104-294, title VI, Secs.    604(b)(14)(A), 607(a), Oct. 11, 1996, 110 Stat. 3507, 3511.)  -MISC1-                       HISTORICAL AND REVISION NOTES                         Based on title 18, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Sec. 51 (Mar. 4, 1909, ch.    321, Sec. 19, 35 Stat. 1092).      Clause making conspirator ineligible to hold office was omitted    as incongruous because it attaches ineligibility to hold office to    a person who may be a private citizen and who was convicted of    conspiracy to violate a specific statute. There seems to be no    reason for imposing such a penalty in the case of one individual    crime, in view of the fact that other crimes do not carry such a    severe consequence. The experience of the Department of Justice is    that this unusual penalty has been an obstacle to successful    prosecutions for violations of the act.      Mandatory punishment provision was rephrased in the alternative.      Minor changes in phraseology were made.                                 AMENDMENTS                                  1996 – Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 607(a), substituted “any State,    Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District” for “any State,    Territory, or District” in first par.      Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(A), repealed Pub. L. 103-322,    Sec. 320103(a)(1). See 1994 Amendment note below.      1994 – Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(L), substituted “They    shall be fined under this title” for “They shall be fined not more    than $10,000″ in third par.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320201(a), substituted “person in any    State” for “inhabitant of any State” in first par.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(a)(2)-(4), in third par.,    substituted “results from the acts committed in violation of this    section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap,    aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual    abuse, or an attempt to kill, they shall be fined under this title    or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both” for    “results, they shall be subject to imprisonment for any term of    years or for life”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(a)(1), which provided for amendment    identical to Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(L), above, was    repealed by Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(A).      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 60006(a), substituted “, or may be    sentenced to death.” for period at end of third par.      1988 – Pub. L. 100-690 struck out “of citizens” after “rights” in    section catchline and substituted “inhabitant of any State,    Territory, or District” for “citizen” in text.      1968 – Pub. L. 90-284 increased limitation on fines from $5,000    to $10,000 and provided for imprisonment for any term of years or    for life when death results.                      EFFECTIVE DATE OF 1996 AMENDMENT                       Amendment by section 604(b)(14)(A) of Pub. L. 104-294 effective    Sept. 13, 1994, see section 604(d) of Pub. L. 104-294, set out as a    note under section 13 of this title.                        SHORT TITLE OF 1996 AMENDMENT                         Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 1, July 3, 1996, 110 Stat. 1392, provided    that: “This Act [amending section 247 of this title and section    10602 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, enacting    provisions set out as a note under section 247 of this title, and    amending provisions set out as a note under section 534 of Title    28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure] may be cited as the ‘Church    Arson Prevention Act of 1996′.” -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 242                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 242. Deprivation of rights under color of law -STATUTE-      Whoever, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation,    or custom, willfully subjects any person in any State, Territory,    Commonwealth, Possession, or District to the deprivation of any    rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the    Constitution or laws of the United States, or to different    punishments, pains, or penalties, on account of such person being    an alien, or by reason of his color, or race, than are prescribed    for the punishment of citizens, shall be fined under this title or    imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury    results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if    such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a    dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire, shall be fined under this    title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death    results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if    such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated    sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or    an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned    for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to    death. -SOURCE-    (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 696; Pub. L. 90-284, title I,    Sec. 103(b), Apr. 11, 1968, 82 Stat. 75; Pub. L. 100-690, title    VII, Sec. 7019, Nov. 18, 1988, 102 Stat. 4396; Pub. L. 103-322,    title VI, Sec. 60006(b), title XXXII, Secs. 320103(b), 320201(b),    title XXXIII, Sec. 330016(1)(H), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 1970,    2109, 2113, 2147; Pub. L. 104-294, title VI, Secs. 604(b)(14)(B),    607(a), Oct. 11, 1996, 110 Stat. 3507, 3511.)  -MISC1-                       HISTORICAL AND REVISION NOTES                         Based on title 18, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Sec. 52 (Mar. 4, 1909, ch.    321, Sec. 20, 35 Stat. 1092).      Reference to persons causing or procuring was omitted as    unnecessary in view of definition of “principal” in section 2 of    this title.      A minor change was made in phraseology.                                 AMENDMENTS                                  1996 – Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 607(a), substituted “any State,    Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District” for “any State,    Territory, or District”.      Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(B), repealed Pub. L. 103-322,    Sec. 320103(b)(1). See 1994 Amendment note below.      1994 – Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(H), substituted “shall be    fined under this title” for “shall be fined not more than $1,000″    after “citizens,”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320201(b), substituted “any person in any    State” for “any inhabitant of any State” and “on account of such    person” for “on account of such inhabitant”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(b)(2)-(5), substituted “bodily    injury results from the acts committed in violation of this section    or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use    of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire, shall be fined under    this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if    death results from the acts committed in violation of this section    or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap,    aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual    abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or    imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both” for “bodily    injury results shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not    more than ten years, or both; and if death results shall be subject    to imprisonment for any term of years or for life”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(b)(1), which provided for amendment    identical to Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(H), above, was    repealed by Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(B).      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 60006(b), inserted before period at end “,    or may be sentenced to death”.      1988 – Pub. L. 100-690 inserted “and if bodily injury results    shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten    years, or both;” after “or both;”.      1968 – Pub. L. 90-284 provided for imprisonment for any term of    years or for life when death results.                      EFFECTIVE DATE OF 1996 AMENDMENT                       Amendment by section 604(b)(14)(B) of Pub. L. 104-294 effective    Sept. 13, 1994, see section 604(d) of Pub. L. 104-294, set out as a    note under section 13 of this title. -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 243                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 243. Exclusion of jurors on account of race or color -STATUTE-      No citizen possessing all other qualifications which are or may    be prescribed by law shall be disqualified for service as grand or    petit juror in any court of the United States, or of any State on    account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude; and    whoever, being an officer or other person charged with any duty in    the selection or summoning of jurors, excludes or fails to summon    any citizen for such cause, shall be fined not more than $5,000. -SOURCE-    (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 696.)  -MISC1-                       HISTORICAL AND REVISION NOTES                         Based on section 44 of title 8, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Aliens and    Nationality (Mar. 1, 1875, ch. 114, Sec. 4, 18 Stat. 336).      Words “be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and” were deleted as    unnecessary in view of definition of misdemeanor in section 1 of    this title.      Words “on conviction thereof” were omitted as unnecessary, since    punishment follows only after conviction.      Minimum punishment provisions were omitted. (See reviser’s note    under section 203 of this title.)      Minor changes in phraseology were made. -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 244                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 244. Discrimination against person wearing uniform of armed      forces -STATUTE-      Whoever, being a proprietor, manager, or employee of a theater or    other public place of entertainment or amusement in the District of    Columbia, or in any Territory, or Possession of the United States,    causes any person wearing the uniform of any of the armed forces of    the United States to be discriminated against because of that    uniform, shall be fined under this title. -SOURCE-    (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 697; May 24, 1949, ch. 139, Sec.    5, 63 Stat. 90; Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, Sec. 330016(1)(G),    Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)  -MISC1-                       HISTORICAL AND REVISION NOTES                                                     1948 ACT                                   Based on title 18, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Sec. 523 (Mar. 1, 1911, ch.    187, 36 Stat. 963; Aug. 24, 1912, ch. 387, Sec. 1, 37 Stat. 512;    Jan. 28, 1915, ch. 20, Sec. 1, 38 Stat. 800).      Words “guilty of a misdemeanor”, following “shall be”, were    omitted as unnecessary in view of definition of “misdemeanor” in    section 1 of this title. (See reviser’s note under section 212 of    this title.)      Changes were made in phraseology.                                  1949 ACT                                   This section [section 5] substitutes, in section 244 of title 18,    U.S.C., “any of the armed forces of the United States” for the    enumeration of specific branches and thereby includes the Air    Force, formerly part of the Army. This clarification is necessary    because of the establishment of the Air Force as a separate branch    of the Armed Forces by the act of July 26, 1947.                                 AMENDMENTS                                  1994 – Pub. L. 103-322 substituted “fined under this title” for    “fined not more than $500″.      1949 – Act May 24, 1949, substituted “any of the armed forces of    the United States” for enumeration of the specific branches. -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 245                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 245. Federally protected activities -STATUTE-      (a)(1) Nothing in this section shall be construed as indicating    an intent on the part of Congress to prevent any State, any    possession or Commonwealth of the United States, or the District of    Columbia, from exercising jurisdiction over any offense over which    it would have jurisdiction in the absence of this section, nor    shall anything in this section be construed as depriving State and    local law enforcement authorities of responsibility for prosecuting    acts that may be violations of this section and that are violations    of State and local law. No prosecution of any offense described in    this section shall be undertaken by the United States except upon    the certification in writing of the Attorney General, the Deputy    Attorney General, the Associate Attorney General, or any Assistant    Attorney General specially designated by the Attorney General that    in his judgment a prosecution by the United States is in the public    interest and necessary to secure substantial justice, which    function of certification may not be delegated.      (2) Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to limit the    authority of Federal officers, or a Federal grand jury, to    investigate possible violations of this section.      (b) Whoever, whether or not acting under color of law, by force    or threat of force willfully injures, intimidates or interferes    with, or attempts to injure, intimidate or interfere with –         (1) any person because he is or has been, or in order to      intimidate such person or any other person or any class of      persons from –           (A) voting or qualifying to vote, qualifying or campaigning        as a candidate for elective office, or qualifying or acting as        a poll watcher, or any legally authorized election official, in        any primary, special, or general election;          (B) participating in or enjoying any benefit, service,        privilege, program, facility, or activity provided or        administered by the United States;          (C) applying for or enjoying employment, or any perquisite        thereof, by any agency of the United States;          (D) serving, or attending upon any court in connection with        possible service, as a grand or petit juror in any court of the        United States;          (E) participating in or enjoying the benefits of any program        or activity receiving Federal financial assistance; or         (2) any person because of his race, color, religion or national      origin and because he is or has been –           (A) enrolling in or attending any public school or public        college;          (B) participating in or enjoying any benefit, service,        privilege, program, facility or activity provided or        administered by any State or subdivision thereof;          (C) applying for or enjoying employment, or any perquisite        thereof, by any private employer or any agency of any State or        subdivision thereof, or joining or using the services or        advantages of any labor organization, hiring hall, or        employment agency;          (D) serving, or attending upon any court of any State in        connection with possible service, as a grand or petit juror;          (E) traveling in or using any facility of interstate        commerce, or using any vehicle, terminal, or facility of any        common carrier by motor, rail, water, or air;          (F) enjoying the goods, services, facilities, privileges,        advantages, or accommodations of any inn, hotel, motel, or        other establishment which provides lodging to transient guests,        or of any restaurant, cafeteria, lunchroom, lunch counter, soda        fountain, or other facility which serves the public and which        is principally engaged in selling food or beverages for        consumption on the premises, or of any gasoline station, or of        any motion picture house, theater, concert hall, sports arena,        stadium, or any other place of exhibition or entertainment        which serves the public, or of any other establishment which        serves the public and (i) which is located within the premises        of any of the aforesaid establishments or within the premises        of which is physically located any of the aforesaid        establishments, and (ii) which holds itself out as serving        patrons of such establishments; or         (3) during or incident to a riot or civil disorder, any person      engaged in a business in commerce or affecting commerce,      including, but not limited to, any person engaged in a business      which sells or offers for sale to interstate travelers a      substantial portion of the articles, commodities, or services      which it sells or where a substantial portion of the articles or      commodities which it sells or offers for sale have moved in      commerce; or        (4) any person because he is or has been, or in order to      intimidate such person or any other person or any class of      persons from –           (A) participating, without discrimination on account of race,        color, religion or national origin, in any of the benefits or        activities described in subparagraphs (1)(A) through (1)(E) or        subparagraphs (2)(A) through (2)(F); or          (B) affording another person or class of persons opportunity        or protection to so participate; or         (5) any citizen because he is or has been, or in order to      intimidate such citizen or any other citizen from lawfully aiding      or encouraging other persons to participate, without      discrimination on account of race, color, religion or national      origin, in any of the benefits or activities described in      subparagraphs (1)(A) through (1)(E) or subparagraphs (2)(A)      through (2)(F), or participating lawfully in speech or peaceful      assembly opposing any denial of the opportunity to so participate      –      shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned not more than one    year, or both; and if bodily injury results from the acts committed    in violation of this section or if such acts include the use,    attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives,    or fire shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned not more    than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts    committed in violation of this section or if such acts include    kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an    attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill,    shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years    or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death. As used in this    section, the term “participating lawfully in speech or peaceful    assembly” shall not mean the aiding, abetting, or inciting of other    persons to riot or to commit any act of physical violence upon any    individual or against any real or personal property in furtherance    of a riot. Nothing in subparagraph (2)(F) or (4)(A) of this    subsection shall apply to the proprietor of any establishment which    provides lodging to transient guests, or to any employee acting on    behalf of such proprietor, with respect to the enjoyment of the    goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or    accommodations of such establishment if such establishment is    located within a building which contains not more than five rooms    for rent or hire and which is actually occupied by the proprietor    as his residence.      (c) Nothing in this section shall be construed so as to deter any    law enforcement officer from lawfully carrying out the duties of    his office; and no law enforcement officer shall be considered to    be in violation of this section for lawfully carrying out the    duties of his office or lawfully enforcing ordinances and laws of    the United States, the District of Columbia, any of the several    States, or any political subdivision of a State. For purposes of    the preceding sentence, the term “law enforcement officer” means    any officer of the United States, the District of Columbia, a    State, or political subdivision of a State, who is empowered by law    to conduct investigations of, or make arrests because of, offenses    against the United States, the District of Columbia, a State, or a    political subdivision of a State.      (d) For purposes of this section, the term “State” includes a    State of the United States, the District of Columbia, and any    commonwealth, territory, or possession of the United States. -SOURCE-    (Added Pub. L. 90-284, title I, Sec. 101(a), Apr. 11, 1968, 82    Stat. 73; amended Pub. L. 100-690, title VII, Sec. 7020(a), Nov.    18, 1988, 102 Stat. 4396; Pub. L. 101-647, title XII, Sec. 1205(b),    Nov. 29, 1990, 104 Stat. 4830; Pub. L. 103-322, title VI, Sec.    60006(c), title XXXII, Sec. 320103(c), title XXXIII, Sec.    330016(1)(H), (L), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 1971, 2109, 2147; Pub.    L. 104-294, title VI, Sec. 604(b)(14)(C), (37), Oct. 11, 1996, 110    Stat. 3507, 3509.)  -MISC1-                                AMENDMENTS                                  1996 – Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 104-294 amended Pub. L. 103-322, Sec.    320103(c). See 1994 Amendment notes below.      1994 – Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(L),    substituted “shall be fined under this title” for “shall be fined    not more than $10,000″ before “, or imprisoned not more than ten    years” in concluding provisions.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(H), substituted “shall be fined    under this title” for “shall be fined not more than $1,000″ before    “, or imprisoned not more than one year” in concluding provisions.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(c)(4)-(6), in concluding provisions,    inserted “from the acts committed in violation of this section or    if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated    sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an    attempt to kill,” after “death results” and substituted “shall be    fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years or for    life, or both” for “shall be subject to imprisonment for any term    of years or for life”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(c)(3), which provided for amendment    identical to Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(L), above, was    repealed by Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(C).      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(c)(2), as amended by Pub. L. 104-    294, Sec. 604(b)(37), inserted “from the acts committed in    violation of this section or if such acts include the use,    attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives,    or fire” after “bodily injury results” in concluding provisions.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(c)(1), which provided for amendment    identical to Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330016(1)(H), above, was    repealed by Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 604(b)(14)(C).      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 60006(c), in concluding provisions,    inserted “, or may be sentenced to death” before “. As used in this    section”.      1990 – Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 101-647 added subsec. (d).      1988 – Subsec. (a)(1). Pub. L. 100-690 substituted “, the Deputy”    for “or the Deputy” and inserted “, the Associate Attorney General,    or any Assistant Attorney General specially designated by the    Attorney General” after “Deputy Attorney General”.                      EFFECTIVE DATE OF 1996 AMENDMENT                       Amendment by Pub. L. 104-294 effective Sept. 13, 1994, see    section 604(d) of Pub. L. 104-294, set out as a note under section    13 of this title.                                FAIR HOUSING                                 Section 101(b) of Pub. L. 90-284 provided that: “Nothing    contained in this section [enacting this section] shall apply to or    affect activities under title VIII of this Act [sections 3601 to    3619 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare].”     RIOTS OR CIVIL DISTURBANCES, SUPPRESSION AND RESTORATION OF LAW AND      ORDER; ACTS OR OMISSIONS OF ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF               MILITARY SERVICE NOT SUBJECT TO THIS SECTION      Section 101(c) of Pub. L. 90-284 provided that: “The provisions    of this section [enacting this section] shall not apply to acts or    omissions on the part of law enforcement officers, members of the    National Guard, as defined in section 101(9) of title 10, United    States Code, members of the organized militia of any State or the    District of Columbia, not covered by such section 101(9), or    members of the Armed Forces of the United States, who are engaged    in suppressing a riot or civil disturbance or restoring law and    order during a riot or civil disturbance.” -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 246                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 246. Deprivation of relief benefits -STATUTE-      Whoever directly or indirectly deprives, attempts to deprive, or    threatens to deprive any person of any employment, position, work,    compensation, or other benefit provided for or made possible in    whole or in part by any Act of Congress appropriating funds for    work relief or relief purposes, on account of political    affiliation, race, color, sex, religion, or national origin, shall    be fined under this title, or imprisoned not more than one year, or    both. -SOURCE-    (Added Pub. L. 94-453, Sec. 4(a), Oct. 2, 1976, 90 Stat. 1517;    amended Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, Sec. 330016(1)(L), Sept. 13,    1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)  -MISC1-                                AMENDMENTS                                  1994 – Pub. L. 103-322 substituted “fined under this title” for    “fined not more than $10,000″. -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 247                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 247. Damage to religious property; obstruction of persons in      the free exercise of religious beliefs -STATUTE-      (a) Whoever, in any of the circumstances referred to in    subsection (b) of this section –         (1) intentionally defaces, damages, or destroys any religious      real property, because of the religious character of that      property, or attempts to do so; or        (2) intentionally obstructs, by force or threat of force, any      person in the enjoyment of that person’s free exercise of      religious beliefs, or attempts to do so;     shall be punished as provided in subsection (d).      (b) The circumstances referred to in subsection (a) are that the    offense is in or affects interstate or foreign commerce.      (c) Whoever intentionally defaces, damages, or destroys any    religious real property because of the race, color, or ethnic    characteristics of any individual associated with that religious    property, or attempts to do so, shall be punished as provided in    subsection (d).      (d) The punishment for a violation of subsection (a) of this    section shall be –         (1) if death results from acts committed in violation of this      section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to      kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit      aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, a fine in      accordance with this title and imprisonment for any term of years      or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death;        (2) if bodily injury results to any person, including any      public safety officer performing duties as a direct or proximate      result of conduct prohibited by this section, and the violation      is by means of fire or an explosive, a fine under this title or      imprisonment for not more that 40 years, or both;        (3) if bodily injury to any person, including any public safety      officer performing duties as a direct or proximate result of      conduct prohibited by this section, results from the acts      committed in violation of this section or if such acts include      the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon,      explosives, or fire, a fine in accordance with this title and      imprisonment for not more than 20 years, or both; and        (4) in any other case, a fine in accordance with this title and      imprisonment for not more than one year, or both.       (e) No prosecution of any offense described in this section shall    be undertaken by the United States except upon the certification in    writing of the Attorney General or his designee that in his    judgment a prosecution by the United States is in the public    interest and necessary to secure substantial justice.      (f) As used in this section, the term “religious real property”    means any church, synagogue, mosque, religious cemetery, or other    religious real property, including fixtures or religious objects    contained within a place of religious worship.      (g) No person shall be prosecuted, tried, or punished for any    noncapital offense under this section unless the indictment is    found or the information is instituted not later than 7 years after    the date on which the offense was committed. -SOURCE-    (Added Pub. L. 100-346, Sec. 1, June 24, 1988, 102 Stat. 644;    amended Pub. L. 103-322, title VI, Sec. 60006(d), title XXXII, Sec.    320103(d), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 1971, 2110; Pub. L. 104-155,    Sec. 3, July 3, 1996, 110 Stat. 1392; Pub. L. 104-294, title VI,    Secs. 601(c)(3), 605(r), Oct. 11, 1996, 110 Stat. 3499, 3511; Pub.    L. 107-273, div. B, title IV, Sec. 4002(c)(1), (e)(4), Nov. 2,    2002, 116 Stat. 1808, 1810.)  -MISC1-                                AMENDMENTS                                  2002 – Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 107-273, Sec. 4002(c)(1), repealed    amendment by Pub. L. 107-273, Sec. 605(r). See 1996 Amendment note    below.      Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 107-273, Sec. 4002(e)(4), made technical    correction to directory language of Pub. L. 104-294, Sec.    601(c)(3). See 1996 Amendment note below.      1996 – Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(1), substituted    “subsection (d)” for “subsection (c) of this section” in concluding    provisions.      Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(3), added subsec. (b) and    struck out former subsec. (b) which read as follows: “The    circumstances referred to in subsection (a) are that –         “(1) in committing the offense, the defendant travels in      interstate or foreign commerce, or uses a facility or      instrumentality of interstate or foreign commerce in interstate      or foreign commerce; and        “(2) in the case of an offense under subsection (a)(1), the      loss resulting from the defacement, damage, or destruction is      more than $10,000.”      Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(2), added subsec. (c).    Former subsec. (c) redesignated (d).      Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 605(r), which directed the    substitution of “certification” for “notification” in subsec. (d),    was repealed by Pub. L. 107-273, Sec. 4002(c)(1).      Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(2), redesignated subsec. (c)    as (d). Former subsec. (d) redesignated (e).      Subsec. (d)(2). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(4)(C), added par. (2).    Former par. (2) redesignated (3).      Subsec. (d)(3). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(4)(A), (B), redesignated    par. (2) as (3), inserted “to any person, including any public    safety officer performing duties as a direct or proximate result of    conduct prohibited by this section,” after “bodily injury” and    substituted “20 years” for “ten years”. Former par. (3)    redesignated (4).      Subsec. (d)(4). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(4)(B), redesignated par.    (3) as (4).      Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 104-294, Sec. 601(c)(3), as amended by Pub.    L. 107-273, Sec. 4002(e)(4), substituted “certification” for    “notification”.      Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(2), redesignated subsec. (d) as (e).    Former subsec. (e) redesignated (f).      Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(2), (5), redesignated    subsec. (e) as (f), inserted “, including fixtures or religious    objects contained within a place of religious worship” before the    period, and substituted “religious real property” for “religious    property” in two places.      Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 104-155, Sec. 3(6), added subsec. (g).      1994 – Subsec. (c)(1). Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(d)(1),    inserted “from acts committed in violation of this section or if    such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated    sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an    attempt to kill” after “death results”.      Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 60006(d), inserted “, or may be sentenced    to death” after “or both”.      Subsec. (c)(2). Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(d)(2), struck out    “serious” before “bodily” and inserted “from the acts committed in    violation of this section or if such acts include the use,    attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives,    or fire” after “injury results”.      Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 320103(d)(3), amended subsec.    (e) generally. Prior to amendment, subsec. (e) read as follows: “As    used in this section –         “(1) the term ‘religious real property’ means any church,      synagogue, mosque, religious cemetery, or other religious real      property; and        “(2) the term ‘serious bodily injury’ means bodily injury that      involves a substantial risk of death, unconsciousness, extreme      physical pain, protracted and obvious disfigurement, or      protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member,      organ, or mental faculty.”                      EFFECTIVE DATE OF 2002 AMENDMENT                       Pub. L. 107-273, div. B, title IV, Sec. 4002(c)(1), Nov. 2, 2002,    116 Stat. 1808, provided that the amendment made by section    4002(c)(1) is effective Oct. 11, 1996.      Pub. L. 107-273, div. B, title IV, Sec. 4002(e)(4), Nov. 2, 2002,    116 Stat. 1810, provided that the amendment made by section    4002(e)(4) is effective Oct. 11, 1996.                           CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS                            Section 2 of Pub. L. 104-155 provided that: “The Congress finds    the following:        “(1) The incidence of arson or other destruction or vandalism      of places of religious worship, and the incidence of violent      interference with an individual’s lawful exercise or attempted      exercise of the right of religious freedom at a place of      religious worship pose a serious national problem.        “(2) The incidence of arson of places of religious worship has      recently increased, especially in the context of places of      religious worship that serve predominantly African-American      congregations.        “(3) Changes in Federal law are necessary to deal properly with      this problem.        “(4) Although local jurisdictions have attempted to respond to      the challenges posed by such acts of destruction or damage to      religious property, the problem is sufficiently serious,      widespread, and interstate in scope to warrant Federal      intervention to assist State and local jurisdictions.        “(5) Congress has authority, pursuant to the Commerce Clause of      the Constitution, to make acts of destruction or damage to      religious property a violation of Federal law.        “(6) Congress has authority, pursuant to section 2 of the 13th      amendment to the Constitution, to make actions of private      citizens motivated by race, color, or ethnicity that interfere      with the ability of citizens to hold or use religious property      without fear of attack, violations of Federal criminal law.” -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 248                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 248. Freedom of access to clinic entrances -STATUTE-      (a) Prohibited Activities. – Whoever –         (1) by force or threat of force or by physical obstruction,      intentionally injures, intimidates or interferes with or attempts      to injure, intimidate or interfere with any person because that      person is or has been, or in order to intimidate such person or      any other person or any class of persons from, obtaining or      providing reproductive health services;        (2) by force or threat of force or by physical obstruction,      intentionally injures, intimidates or interferes with or attempts      to injure, intimidate or interfere with any person lawfully      exercising or seeking to exercise the First Amendment right of      religious freedom at a place of religious worship; or        (3) intentionally damages or destroys the property of a      facility, or attempts to do so, because such facility provides      reproductive health services, or intentionally damages or      destroys the property of a place of religious worship,     shall be subject to the penalties provided in subsection (b) and    the civil remedies provided in subsection (c), except that a parent    or legal guardian of a minor shall not be subject to any penalties    or civil remedies under this section for such activities insofar as    they are directed exclusively at that minor.      (b) Penalties. – Whoever violates this section shall –         (1) in the case of a first offense, be fined in accordance with      this title, or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and        (2) in the case of a second or subsequent offense after a prior      conviction under this section, be fined in accordance with this      title, or imprisoned not more than 3 years, or both;     except that for an offense involving exclusively a nonviolent    physical obstruction, the fine shall be not more than $10,000 and    the length of imprisonment shall be not more than six months, or    both, for the first offense; and the fine shall, notwithstanding    section 3571, be not more than $25,000 and the length of    imprisonment shall be not more than 18 months, or both, for a    subsequent offense; and except that if bodily injury results, the    length of imprisonment shall be not more than 10 years, and if    death results, it shall be for any term of years or for life.      (c) Civil Remedies. –         (1) Right of action. –           (A) In general. – Any person aggrieved by reason of the        conduct prohibited by subsection (a) may commence a civil        action for the relief set forth in subparagraph (B), except        that such an action may be brought under subsection (a)(1) only        by a person involved in providing or seeking to provide, or        obtaining or seeking to obtain, services in a facility that        provides reproductive health services, and such an action may        be brought under subsection (a)(2) only by a person lawfully        exercising or seeking to exercise the First Amendment right of        religious freedom at a place of religious worship or by the        entity that owns or operates such place of religious worship.          (B) Relief. – In any action under subparagraph (A), the court        may award appropriate relief, including temporary, preliminary        or permanent injunctive relief and compensatory and punitive        damages, as well as the costs of suit and reasonable fees for        attorneys and expert witnesses. With respect to compensatory        damages, the plaintiff may elect, at any time prior to the        rendering of final judgment, to recover, in lieu of actual        damages, an award of statutory damages in the amount of $5,000        per violation.         (2) Action by attorney general of the united states. –           (A) In general. – If the Attorney General of the United        States has reasonable cause to believe that any person or group        of persons is being, has been, or may be injured by conduct        constituting a violation of this section, the Attorney General        may commence a civil action in any appropriate United States        District Court.          (B) Relief. – In any action under subparagraph (A), the court        may award appropriate relief, including temporary, preliminary        or permanent injunctive relief, and compensatory damages to        persons aggrieved as described in paragraph (1)(B). The court,        to vindicate the public interest, may also assess a civil        penalty against each respondent –             (i) in an amount not exceeding $10,000 for a nonviolent          physical obstruction and $15,000 for other first violations;          and            (ii) in an amount not exceeding $15,000 for a nonviolent          physical obstruction and $25,000 for any other subsequent          violation.         (3) Actions by state attorneys general. –           (A) In general. – If the Attorney General of a State has        reasonable cause to believe that any person or group of persons        is being, has been, or may be injured by conduct constituting a        violation of this section, such Attorney General may commence a        civil action in the name of such State, as parens patriae on        behalf of natural persons residing in such State, in any        appropriate United States District Court.          (B) Relief. – In any action under subparagraph (A), the court        may award appropriate relief, including temporary, preliminary        or permanent injunctive relief, compensatory damages, and civil        penalties as described in paragraph (2)(B).       (d) Rules of Construction. – Nothing in this section shall be    construed –         (1) to prohibit any expressive conduct (including peaceful      picketing or other peaceful demonstration) protected from legal      prohibition by the First Amendment to the Constitution;        (2) to create new remedies for interference with activities      protected by the free speech or free exercise clauses of the      First Amendment to the Constitution, occurring outside a      facility, regardless of the point of view expressed, or to limit      any existing legal remedies for such interference;        (3) to provide exclusive criminal penalties or civil remedies      with respect to the conduct prohibited by this section, or to      preempt State or local laws that may provide such penalties or      remedies; or        (4) to interfere with the enforcement of State or local laws      regulating the performance of abortions or other reproductive      health services.       (e) Definitions. – As used in this section:        (1) Facility. – The term “facility” includes a hospital,      clinic, physician’s office, or other facility that provides      reproductive health services, and includes the building or      structure in which the facility is located.        (2) Interfere with. – The term “interfere with” means to      restrict a person’s freedom of movement.        (3) Intimidate. – The term “intimidate” means to place a person      in reasonable apprehension of bodily harm to him- or herself or      to another.        (4) Physical obstruction. – The term “physical obstruction”      means rendering impassable ingress to or egress from a facility      that provides reproductive health services or to or from a place      of religious worship, or rendering passage to or from such a      facility or place of religious worship unreasonably difficult or      hazardous.        (5) Reproductive health services. – The term “reproductive      health services” means reproductive health services provided in a      hospital, clinic, physician’s office, or other facility, and      includes medical, surgical, counselling or referral services      relating to the human reproductive system, including services      relating to pregnancy or the termination of a pregnancy.        (6) State. – The term “State” includes a State of the United      States, the District of Columbia, and any commonwealth,      territory, or possession of the United States. -SOURCE-    (Added Pub. L. 103-259, Sec. 3, May 26, 1994, 108 Stat. 694;    amended Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, Sec. 330023(a)(2), (3),    Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2150.)  -MISC1-                                AMENDMENTS                                  1994 – Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330023(a)(2), amended section    catchline generally. Prior to amendment, catchline read as follows:    “Sec. 248 Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances.”      Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 103-322, Sec. 330023(a)(3), in concluding    provisions, inserted “, notwithstanding section 3571,” before “be    not more than $25,000″.                      EFFECTIVE DATE OF 1994 AMENDMENT                       Section 330023(b) of Pub. L. 103-322 provided that: “The    amendments made by this subsection (a) [amending this section]    shall take effect on the date of enactment of the Freedom of Access    to Clinic Entrances Act of 1994 [May 26, 1994].”                               EFFECTIVE DATE                                Section 6 of Pub. L. 103-259 provided that: “This Act [see Short    Title note below] takes effect on the date of the enactment of this    Act [May 26, 1994], and shall apply only with respect to conduct    occurring on or after such date.”                                 SHORT TITLE                                  Section 1 of Pub. L. 103-259 provided that: “This Act [enacting    this section and provisions set out as notes under this section]    may be cited as the ‘Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act of    1994′.”                         SEVERABILITY OF PROVISIONS                          Section 5 of Pub. L. 103-259 provided that: “If any provision of    this Act [see Short Title note above], an amendment made by this    Act, or the application of such provision or amendment to any    person or circumstance is held to be unconstitutional, the    remainder of this Act, the amendments made by this Act, and the    application of the provisions of such to any other person or    circumstance shall not be affected thereby.”                     CONGRESSIONAL STATEMENT OF PURPOSE                      Section 2 of Pub. L. 103-259 provided that: “Pursuant to the    affirmative power of Congress to enact this legislation under    section 8 of article I of the Constitution, as well as under    section 5 of the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution, it is    the purpose of this Act [see Short Title note above] to protect and    promote the public safety and health and activities affecting    interstate commerce by establishing Federal criminal penalties and    civil remedies for certain violent, threatening, obstructive and    destructive conduct that is intended to injure, intimidate or    interfere with persons seeking to obtain or provide reproductive    health services.” -End-   -CITE-    18 USC Sec. 249                                             01/03/2012 (112-90) -EXPCITE-    TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I – CRIMES    CHAPTER 13 – CIVIL RIGHTS -HEAD-    Sec. 249. Hate crime acts -STATUTE-      (a) In General. –         (1) Offenses involving actual or perceived race, color,      religion, or national origin. – Whoever, whether or not acting      under color of law, willfully causes bodily injury to any person      or, through the use of fire, a firearm, a dangerous weapon, or an      explosive or incendiary device, attempts to cause bodily injury      to any person, because of the actual or perceived race, color,      religion, or national origin of any person –           (A) shall be imprisoned not more than 10 years, fined in        accordance with this title, or both; and          (B) shall be imprisoned for any term of years or for life,        fined in accordance with this title, or both, if –             (i) death results from the offense; or            (ii) the offense includes kidnapping or an attempt to          kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit          aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill.         (2) Offenses involving actual or perceived religion, national      origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or      disability. –           (A) In general. – Whoever, whether or not acting under color        of law, in any circumstance described in subparagraph (B) or        paragraph (3), willfully causes bodily injury to any person or,        through the use of fire, a firearm, a dangerous weapon, or an        explosive or incendiary device, attempts to cause bodily injury        to any person, because of the actual or perceived religion,        national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity,        or disability of any person –             (i) shall be imprisoned not more than 10 years, fined in          accordance with this title, or both; and            (ii) shall be imprisoned for any term of years or for life,          fined in accordance with this title, or both, if –               (I) death results from the offense; or              (II) the offense includes kidnapping or an attempt to            kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit            aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill.           (B) Circumstances described. – For purposes of subparagraph        (A), the circumstances described in this subparagraph are that –                     (i) the conduct described in subparagraph (A) occurs during          the course of, or as the result of, the travel of the          defendant or the victim –               (I) across a State line or national border; or              (II) using a channel, facility, or instrumentality of            interstate or foreign commerce;             (ii) the defendant uses a channel, facility, or          instrumentality of interstate or foreign commerce in          connection with the conduct described in subparagraph (A);            (iii) in connection with the conduct described in          subparagraph (A), the defendant employs a firearm, dangerous          weapon, explosive or incendiary device, or other weapon that          has traveled in interstate or foreign commerce; or            (iv) the conduct described in subparagraph (A) –               (I) interferes with commercial or other economic activity            in which the victim is engaged at the time of the conduct;            or              (II) otherwise affects interstate or foreign commerce.         (3) Offenses occurring in the special maritime or territorial      jurisdiction of the united states. – Whoever, within the special      maritime or territorial jurisdiction of the United States,      engages in conduct described in paragraph (1) or in paragraph      (2)(A) (without regard to whether that conduct occurred in a      circumstance described in paragraph (2)(B)) shall be subject to      the same penalties as prescribed in those paragraphs.        (4) Guidelines. – All prosecutions conducted by the United      States under this section shall be undertaken pursuant to      guidelines issued by the Attorney General, or the designee of the      Attorney General, to be included in the United States Attorneys’      Manual that shall establish neutral and objective criteria for      determining whether a crime was committed because of the actual      or perceived status of any person.       (b) Certification Requirement. –         (1) In general. – No prosecution of any offense described in      this subsection may be undertaken by the United States, except      under the certification in writing of the Attorney General, or a      designee, that –           (A) the State does not have jurisdiction;          (B) the State has requested that the Federal Government        assume jurisdiction;          (C) the verdict or sentence obtained pursuant to State        charges left demonstratively unvindicated the Federal interest        in eradicating bias-motivated violence; or          (D) a prosecution by the United States is in the public        interest and necessary to secure substantial justice.         (2) Rule of construction. – Nothing in this subsection shall be      construed to limit the authority of Federal officers, or a      Federal grand jury, to investigate possible violations of this      section.       (c) Definitions. – In this section –         (1) the term “bodily injury” has the meaning given such term in      section 1365(h)(4) of this title, but does not include solely      emotional or psychological harm to the victim;        (2) the term “explosive or incendiary device” has the meaning      given such term in section 232 of this title;        (3) the term “firearm” has the meaning given such term in      section 921(a) of this title;        (4) the term “gender identity” means actual or perceived gender-      related characteristics; and        (5) the term “State” includes the District of Columbia, Puerto      Rico, and any other territory or possession of the United States.       (d) Statute of Limitations. –         (1) Offenses not resulting in death. – Except as provided in      paragraph (2), no person shall be prosecuted, tried, or punished      for any offense under this section unless the indictment for such      offense is found, or the information for such offense is      instituted, not later than 7 years after the date on which the      offense was committed.        (2) Death resulting offenses. – An indictment or information      alleging that an offense under this section resulted in death may      be found or instituted at any time without limitation. -SOURCE-    (Added and amended Pub. L. 111-84, div. E, Secs. 4707(a), 4711,    Oct. 28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2838, 2842.)  -MISC1-                                AMENDMENTS                                  2009 – Subsec. (a)(4). Pub. L. 111-84, Sec. 4711, added par. (4).                                SEVERABILITY                                 Pub. L. 111-84, div. E, Sec. 4709, Oct. 28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2841,    provided that: “If any provision of this division [enacting this    section and section 1389 of this title and sections 3716 and 3716a    of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, amending this section,    enacting provisions set out as notes under this section and section    3716 of Title 42, and amending provisions set out as a note under    section 534 and provisions listed in a table relating to sentencing    guidelines set out under section 994 of Title 28, Judiciary and    Judicial Procedure], an amendment made by this division, or the    application of such provision or amendment to any person or    circumstance is held to be unconstitutional, the remainder of this    division, the amendments made by this division, and the application    of the provisions of such to any person or circumstance shall not    be affected thereby.”                            RULE OF CONSTRUCTION                             Pub. L. 111-84, div. E, Sec. 4710, Oct. 28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2841,    provided that: “For purposes of construing this division [see    Severability note above] and the amendments made by this division    the following shall apply:        “(1) In general. – Nothing in this division shall be construed      to allow a court, in any criminal trial for an offense described      under this division or an amendment made by this division, in the      absence of a stipulation by the parties, to admit evidence of      speech, beliefs, association, group membership, or expressive      conduct unless that evidence is relevant and admissible under the      Federal Rules of Evidence. Nothing in this division is intended      to affect the existing rules of evidence.        “(2) Violent acts. – This division applies to violent acts      motivated by actual or perceived race, color, religion, national      origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or      disability of a victim.        “(3) Construction and application. – Nothing in this division,      or an amendment made by this division, shall be construed or      applied in a manner that infringes any rights under the first      amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Nor shall      anything in this division, or an amendment made by this division,      be construed or applied in a manner that substantially burdens a      person’s exercise of religion (regardless of whether compelled      by, or central to, a system of religious belief), speech,      expression, or association, unless the Government demonstrates      that application of the burden to the person is in furtherance of      a compelling governmental interest and is the least restrictive      means of furthering that compelling governmental interest, if      such exercise of religion, speech, expression, or association was      not intended to –           “(A) plan or prepare for an act of physical violence; or          “(B) incite an imminent act of physical violence against        another.        “(4) Free expression. – Nothing in this division shall be      construed to allow prosecution based solely upon an individual’s      expression of racial, religious, political, or other beliefs or      solely upon an individual’s membership in a group advocating or      espousing such beliefs.        “(5) First amendment. – Nothing in this division, or an      amendment made by this division, shall be construed to diminish      any rights under the first amendment to the Constitution of the      United States.        “(6) Constitutional protections. – Nothing in this division      shall be construed to prohibit any constitutionally protected      speech, expressive conduct or activities (regardless of whether      compelled by, or central to, a system of religious belief),      including the exercise of religion protected by the first      amendment to the Constitution of the United States and peaceful      picketing or demonstration. The Constitution of the United States      does not protect speech, conduct or activities consisting of      planning for, conspiring to commit, or committing an act of      violence.”                                  FINDINGS                                   Pub. L. 111-84, div. E, Sec. 4702, Oct. 28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2835,    provided that: “Congress makes the following findings:        “(1) The incidence of violence motivated by the actual or      perceived race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual      orientation, gender identity, or disability of the victim poses a      serious national problem.        “(2) Such violence disrupts the tranquility and safety of      communities and is deeply divisive.        “(3) State and local authorities are now and will continue to      be responsible for prosecuting the overwhelming majority of      violent crimes in the United States, including violent crimes      motivated by bias. These authorities can carry out their      responsibilities more effectively with greater Federal      assistance.        “(4) Existing Federal law is inadequate to address this      problem.        “(5) A prominent characteristic of a violent crime motivated by      bias is that it devastates not just the actual victim and the      family and friends of the victim, but frequently savages the      community sharing the traits that caused the victim to be      selected.        “(6) Such violence substantially affects interstate commerce in      many ways, including the following:          “(A) The movement of members of targeted groups is impeded,        and members of such groups are forced to move across State        lines to escape the incidence or risk of such violence.          “(B) Members of targeted groups are prevented from purchasing        goods and services, obtaining or sustaining employment, or        participating in other commercial activity.          “(C) Perpetrators cross State lines to commit such violence.          “(D) Channels, facilities, and instrumentalities of        interstate commerce are used to facilitate the commission of        such violence.          “(E) Such violence is committed using articles that have        traveled in interstate commerce.        “(7) For generations, the institutions of slavery and      involuntary servitude were defined by the race, color, and      ancestry of those held in bondage. Slavery and involuntary      servitude were enforced, both prior to and after the adoption of      the 13th amendment to the Constitution of the United States,      through widespread public and private violence directed at      persons because of their race, color, or ancestry, or perceived      race, color, or ancestry. Accordingly, eliminating racially      motivated violence is an important means of eliminating, to the      extent possible, the badges, incidents, and relics of slavery and      involuntary servitude.        “(8) Both at the time when the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments      to the Constitution of the United States were adopted, and      continuing to date, members of certain religious and national      origin groups were and are perceived to be distinct ‘races’.      Thus, in order to eliminate, to the extent possible, the badges,      incidents, and relics of slavery, it is necessary to prohibit      assaults on the basis of real or perceived religions or national      origins, at least to the extent such religions or national      origins were regarded as races at the time of the adoption of the      13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the Constitution of the United      States.        “(9) Federal jurisdiction over certain violent crimes motivated      by bias enables Federal, State, and local authorities to work      together as partners in the investigation and prosecution of such      crimes.        “(10) The problem of crimes motivated by bias is sufficiently      serious, widespread, and interstate in nature as to warrant      Federal assistance to States, local jurisdictions, and Indian      tribes.”      [For definitions of “State” and “local” used in section 4702 of    Pub. L. 111-84, set out above, see section 4703(b) of Pub. L. 111-    84, set out as a note under section 3716 of Title 42, The Public    Health and Welfare.] -End-

 

Our legal status

F.S.I.C. Corp official Seal

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 Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan of Colorado corp, Native American Church is a Colorado nonprofit corporation. We are a Place of worship and spiritual healing. As a nonprofit charity we are not organized for the private gain of any person and do not charge for services. Everything that we do is done for the improvement of the quality of life and spiritual well being of all who are willing to embrace these ancient traditions.

Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan of Colorado corp. is an affiliate of The Native American Church. We are the largest denomination of the Indigenous American Religion in history. As a Native American Church we are registered with the D.E.A. Our Road Man at this time is Chris Long who was ordained in 2006 by Aurelio Diaz Tekpankalli.

  • Entity identification conformation # 9154675.
  • E.I.N # 1430870870-6249
  • D.E.A.# A0021.

Unfortunately The Native American Church is highly judged and persecuted. As a federally protected Religion, legal penalties are severe for interfering with our ceremonies. Below are some helpful links regarding our legal status.

We also are members of Crestone Spiritual Alliance. The Singing Stone is the name of our drum group, (a sub-committee of our Church) which sings at many Traditional ceremonies and dances. As a Church we have the following attributes:

 

⊕ CONSEQUENCES FOR VIOLATING THE CIVIL LIBERTIES OF FUEGO SAGRADO DE ITZACHILATLAN OF COLORADO NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH OR IT’S MEMBERS.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

U.N.

 

Adopted by General Assembly Resolution 61/295 on 13 September 2007

 

The General Assembly,

 

Guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and good faith in the fulfilment of the obligations assumed by States in accordance with the Charter,

 

Affirming that indigenous peoples are equal to all other peoples, while recognizing the right of all peoples to be different, to consider themselves different, and to be respected as such,

 

Affirming also that all peoples contribute to the diversity and richness of civilizations and cultures, which constitute the common heritage of humankind,

 

Affirming further that all doctrines, policies and practices based on or advocating superiority of peoples or individuals on the basis of national origin or racial, religious, ethnic or cultural differences are racist, scientifically false, legally invalid, morally condemnable and socially unjust,

 

Reaffirming that indigenous peoples, in the exercise of their rights, should be free from discrimination of any kind,

 

Concerned that indigenous peoples have suffered from historic injustices as a result of, inter alia, their colonization and dispossession of their lands, territories and resources, thus preventing them from exercising, in particular, their right to development in accordance with their own needs and interests,

 

Recognizing the urgent need to respect and promote the inherent rights of indigenous peoples which derive from their political, economic and social structures and from their cultures, spiritual traditions, histories and philosophies, especially their rights to their lands, territories and resources,

 

Recognizing also the urgent need to respect and promote the rights of indigenous peoples affirmed in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements with States,

 

Welcoming the fact that indigenous peoples are organizing themselves for political, economic, social and cultural enhancement and in order to bring to an end all forms of discrimination and oppression wherever they occur,

 

Convinced that control by indigenous peoples over developments affecting them and their lands, territories and resources will enable them to maintain and strengthen their institutions, cultures and traditions, and to promote their development in accordance with their aspirations and needs,

 

Recognizing that respect for indigenous knowledge, cultures and traditional practices contributes to sustainable and equitable development and proper management of the environment,

Emphasizing the contribution of the demilitarization of the lands and territories of indigenous peoples to peace, economic and social progress and development, understanding and friendly relations among nations and peoples of the world,

 

Recognizing in particular the right of indigenous families and communities to retain shared responsibility for the upbringing, training, education and well-being of their children, consistent with the rights of the child,

 

Considering that the rights affirmed in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements between States and indigenous peoples are, in some situations, matters of international concern, interest, responsibility and character,

 

Considering also that treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements, and the relationship they represent, are the basis for a strengthened partnership between indigenous peoples and States,

 

Acknowledging that the Charter of the United Nations, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

(2) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,2 as well as the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action,

(3) affirm the fundamental importance of the right to self-determination of all peoples, by virtue of which they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development,

 

Bearing in mind that nothing in this Declaration may be used to deny any peoples their right to self-determination, exercised in conformity with international law,

 

Convinced that the recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples in this Declaration will enhance harmonious and cooperative relations between the State and indigenous peoples, based on principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, non-discrimination and good faith,

 

Encouraging States to comply with and effectively implement all their obligations as they apply to indigenous peoples under international instruments, in particular those related to human rights, in consultation and cooperation with the peoples concerned,

 

Emphasizing that the United Nations has an important and continuing role to play in promoting and protecting the rights of indigenous peoples,

 

Believing that this Declaration is a further important step forward for the recognition, promotion and protection of the rights and freedoms of indigenous peoples and in the development of relevant activities of the United Nations system in this field,

 

Recognizing and reaffirming that indigenous individuals are entitled without discrimination to all human rights recognized in international law, and that indigenous peoples possess collective rights which are indispensable for their existence, well-being and integral development as peoples,

Recognizing that the situation of indigenous peoples varies from region to region and from country to country and that the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical and cultural backgrounds should be taken into consideration,

 

Solemnly proclaims the following United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a standard of achievement to be pursued in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect:

 

Article 1

Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights(4) and international human rights law.

 

Article 2

Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin or identity.

 

Article 3

Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

 

Article 4

Indigenous peoples, in exercising their right to self-determination, have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, as well as ways and means for financing their autonomous functions.

 

Article 5

Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions, while retaining their right to participate fully, if they so choose, in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the State.

 

Article 6

Every indigenous individual has the right to a nationality.

 

Article 7

  1. Indigenous individuals have the rights to life, physical and mental integrity, liberty and security of person.
  2. Indigenous peoples have the collective right to live in freedom, peace and security as distinct peoples and shall not be subjected to any act of genocide or any other act of violence, including forcibly removing children of the group to another group.

 

Article 8

  1. Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right not to be subjected to forced assimilation or destruction of their culture.
  2. States shall provide effective mechanisms for prevention of, and redress for:

(a) Any action which has the aim or effect of depriving them of their integrity as distinct peoples, or of their cultural values or ethnic identities;

(b) Any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources;

(c) Any form of forced population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights;

(d) Any form of forced assimilation or integration;

(e) Any form of propaganda designed to promote or incite racial or ethnic discrimination directed against them.

 

Article 9

Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right to belong to an indigenous community or nation, in accordance with the traditions and customs of the community or nation concerned. No discrimination of any kind may arise from the exercise of such a right.

 

Article 10

Indigenous peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands or territories. No relocation shall take place without the free, prior and informed consent of the indigenous peoples concerned and after agreement on just and fair compensation and, where possible, with the option of return.

 

Article 11

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to practise and revitalize their cultural traditions and customs. This includes the right to maintain, protect and develop the past, present and future manifestations of their cultures, such as archaeological and historical sites, artefacts, designs, ceremonies, technologies and visual and performing arts and literature.
  2. States shall provide redress through effective mechanisms, which may include restitution, developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples, with respect to their cultural, intellectual, religious and spiritual property taken without their free, prior and informed consent or in violation of their laws, traditions and customs.

 

Article 12

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to manifest, practise, develop and teach their spiritual and religious traditions, customs and ceremonies; the right to maintain, protect, and have access in privacy to their religious and cultural sites; the right to the use and control of their ceremonial objects; and the right to the repatriation of their human remains.
  2. States shall seek to enable the access and/or repatriation of ceremonial objects and human remains in their possession through fair, transparent and effective mechanisms developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned.

 

Article 13

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.
  2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.

 

Article 14

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.
  2. Indigenous individuals, particularly children, have the right to all levels and forms of education of the State without discrimination.
  3. States shall, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, take effective measures, in order for indigenous individuals, particularly children, including those living outside their communities, to have access, when possible, to an education in their own culture and provided in their own language.

 

Article 15

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations which shall be appropriately reflected in education and public information.
  2. States shall take effective measures, in consultation and cooperation with the indigenous peoples concerned, to combat prejudice and eliminate discrimination and to promote tolerance, understanding and good relations among indigenous peoples and all other segments of society.

 

Article 16

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish their own media in their own languages and to have access to all forms of non-indigenous media without discrimination.
  2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that State-owned media duly reflect indigenous cultural diversity. States, without prejudice to ensuring full freedom of expression, should encourage privately owned media to adequately reflect indigenous cultural diversity.

 

Article 17

  1. Indigenous individuals and peoples have the right to enjoy fully all rights established under applicable international and domestic labour law.
  2. States shall in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples take specific measures to protect indigenous children from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child’s education, or to be harmful to the child’s health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development, taking into account their special vulnerability and the importance of education for their empowerment.
  3. Indigenous individuals have the right not to be subjected to any discriminatory conditions of labour and, inter alia, employment or salary.

 

Article 18

Indigenous peoples have the right to participate in decision-making in matters which would affect their rights, through representatives chosen by themselves in accordance with their own procedures, as well as to maintain and develop their own indigenous decision-making institutions.

 

Article 19

States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free, prior and informed consent before adopting and implementing legislative or administrative measures that may affect them.

 

Article 20

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economic activities.
  2. Indigenous peoples deprived of their means of subsistence and development are entitled to just and fair redress.

 

Article 21

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right, without discrimination, to the improvement of their economic and social conditions, including, inter alia, in the areas of education, employment, vocational training and retraining, housing, sanitation, health and social security.
  2. States shall take effective measures and, where appropriate, special measures to ensure continuing improvement of their economic and social conditions. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities.

 

Article 22

  1. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities in the implementation of this Declaration.
  2. States shall take measures, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, to ensure that indigenous women and children enjoy the full protection and guarantees against all forms of violence and discrimination.

 

Article 23

Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for exercising their right to development.

In particular, indigenous peoples have the right to be actively involved in developing and determining health, housing and other economic and social programmes affecting them and, as far as possible, to administer such programmes through their own institutions.

 

Article 24

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to their traditional medicines and to maintain their health practices, including the conservation of their vital medicinal plants, animals and minerals.

Indigenous individuals also have the right to access, without any discrimination, to all social and health services.

  1. Indigenous individuals have an equal right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. States shall take the necessary steps with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of this right.

 

Article 25

Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with their traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources and to uphold their responsibilities to future generations in this regard.

 

Article 26

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise used or acquired.
  2. Indigenous peoples have the right to own, use, develop and control the lands, territories and resources that they possess by reason of traditional ownership or other traditional occupation or use, as well as those which they have otherwise acquired.
  3. States shall give legal recognition and protection to these lands, territories and resources. Such recognition shall be conducted with due respect to the customs, traditions and land tenure systems of the indigenous peoples concerned.

 

Article 27

States shall establish and implement, in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned, a fair, independent, impartial, open and transparent process, giving due recognition to indigenous peoples’

laws, traditions, customs and land tenure systems, to recognize and adjudicate the rights of indigenous peoples pertaining to their lands, territories and resources, including those which were traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used.

Indigenous peoples shall have the right to participate in this process.

 

Article 28

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to redress, by means that can include restitution or, when this is not possible, just, fair and equitable compensation, for the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used, and which have been confiscated, taken, occupied, used or damaged without their free, prior and informed consent.
  2. Unless otherwise freely agreed upon by the peoples concerned, compensation shall take the form of lands, territories and resources equal in quality, size and legal status or of monetary compensation or other appropriate redress.

 

Article 29

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the conservation and protection of the environment and the productive capacity of their lands or territories and resources. States shall establish and implement assistance programmes for indigenous peoples for such conservation and protection, without discrimination.
  2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that no storage or disposal of hazardous materials shall take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples without their free, prior and informed consent.
  3. States shall also take effective measures to ensure, as needed, that programmes for monitoring, maintaining and restoring the health of indigenous peoples, as developed and implemented by the peoples affected by such materials, are duly implemented.

 

Article 30

  1. Military activities shall not take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples, unless justified by a relevant public interest or otherwise freely agreed with or requested by the indigenous peoples concerned.
  2. States shall undertake effective consultations with the indigenous peoples concerned, through appropriate procedures and in particular through their representative institutions, prior to using their lands or territories for military activities.

 

Article 31

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games and visual and performing arts.

They also have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions.

  1. In conjunction with indigenous peoples, States shall take effective measures to recognize and protect the exercise of these rights.

 

Article 32

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for the development or use of their lands or territories and other resources.
  2. States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free and informed consent prior to the approval of any project affecting their lands or territories and other resources, particularly in connection with the development, utilization or exploitation of mineral, water or other resources.
  3. States shall provide effective mechanisms for just and fair redress for any such activities, and appropriate measures shall be taken to mitigate adverse environmental, economic, social, cultural or spiritual impact.

 

Article 33

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine their own identity or membership in accordance with their customs and traditions. This does not impair the right of indigenous individuals to obtain citizenship of the States in which they live.
  2. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the structures and to select the membership of their institutions in accordance with their own procedures.

 

Article 34

Indigenous peoples have the right to promote, develop and maintain their institutional structures and their distinctive customs, spirituality, traditions, procedures, practices and, in the cases where they exist, juridical systems or customs, in accordance with international human rights standards.

 

Article 35

Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the responsibilities of individuals to their communities.

 

Article 36

  1. Indigenous peoples, in particular those divided by international borders, have the right to maintain and develop contacts, relations and cooperation, including activities for spiritual, cultural, political, economic and social purposes, with their own members as well as other peoples across borders.
  2. States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take effective measures to facilitate the exercise and ensure the implementation of this right.

 

Article 37

  1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the recognition, observance and enforcement of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements concluded with States or their successors and to have States honour and respect such treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
  2. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as diminishing or eliminating the rights of indigenous peoples contained in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.

 

Article 38

States in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take the appropriate measures, including legislative measures, to achieve the ends of this Declaration.

 

Article 39

Indigenous peoples have the right to have access to financial and technical assistance from States and through international cooperation, for the enjoyment of the rights contained in this Declaration.

 

Article 40

Indigenous peoples have the right to access to and prompt decision through just and fair procedures for the resolution of conflicts and disputes with States or other parties, as well as to effective remedies for all infringements of their individual and collective rights. Such a decision shall give due consideration to the customs, traditions, rules and legal systems of the indigenous peoples concerned and international human rights.

 

Article 41

The organs and specialized agencies of the United Nations system and other intergovernmental organizations shall contribute to the full realization of the provisions of this Declaration through the mobilization, inter alia, of financial cooperation and technical assistance. Ways and means of ensuring participation of indigenous peoples on issues affecting them shall be established.

 

Article 42

The United Nations, its bodies, including the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and specialized agencies, including at the country level, and States shall promote respect for and full application of the provisions of this Declaration and follow up the effectiveness of this Declaration.

 

Article 43

The rights recognized herein constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.

 

Article 44

All the rights and freedoms recognized herein are equally guaranteed to male and female indigenous individuals.

 

Article 45

Nothing in this Declaration may be construed as diminishing or extinguishing the rights indigenous peoples have now or may acquire in the future.

 

Article 46

  1. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, people, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act contrary to the Charter of the United Nations or construed as authorizing or encouraging any action which would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.
  2. In the exercise of the rights enunciated in the present Declaration, human rights and fundamental freedoms of all shall be respected. The exercise of the rights set forth in this Declaration shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law and in accordance with international human rights obligations.

Any such limitations shall be non-discriminatory and strictly necessary solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and for meeting the just and most compelling requirements of a democratic society.

  1. The provisions set forth in this Declaration shall be interpreted in accordance with the principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, equality, non-discrimination, good governance and good faith.

 

 

 

(2) See resolution 2200 A (XXI), annex.

 

(3) A/CONF.157/24 (Part I), chap. III.

 

(4) Resolution 217 A (III).

Six Degrees of Separation to World Peace

 

 

First Amendment of the Bill of Rights

First Amendment of the Bill of Rights

Congressional Seal

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Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances

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The First Amendment of the United States Constitution protects the right to freedom of religion and freedom of expression from government interference. See U.S. Const. amend. I 



Freedom of expression consists of the rights to freedom of speech, press, and assembly and to petition the government for a redress of grievances, and the implied rights of association and belief. The Supreme Court interprets the extent of the protection afforded to these rights. The Court as applying to the entire federal government even though it is only expressly applicable to Congress has interpreted the First Amendment. Furthermore, the Court has interpreted, the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment as protecting the rights in the First Amendment from interference by state governments.  See U.S. Const. amend. XIV.

U.S.A.

DEA Code of Regulations

DEA Code of Regulations

The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I, does not apply to the non drug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native American Church, and members of the Native American Church

 

TITLE 21 – FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER II – DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
PART 1307 – MISCELLANEOUS
1307.31 – Native American Church.
The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I, does not apply to the non drug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native American Church, and members of the Native American Church so using peyote are exempt from registration. Any person who manufactures peyote for or distributes peyote to the Native American Church, however, is required to obtain registration annually and to comply with all other requirements of law.

Dept. of Justice

SPIRITUAL ADVISERS

SPIRITUAL ADVISERS

Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan of Colorado Corp. Native American Church will also have a directive position known as Spiritual Adviser. The Spiritual Advisers duties will be to oversee rituals and ceremonies with the utmost highest reverence, integrity, and diligence in accordance with tradition of how they received the altars and authority to conduct said ceremonies. Spiritual Advisers will not be part of (unless they are Officers, members, and or Directive Council) administrative duties, governing, and or day-to-day maintenance of the Corporation. Spiritual advisers are those who fulfill all requirements and prerequisites as laid out below, and are also appointed by the Directive Council and have a good standing with all officers and members as understood below.

Spiritual advisers can be members, Officers, and or Directive Council, but being any of the latter does not necessarily mean being a spiritual adviser. Being a Spiritual Adviser is a privilege and requires strenuous prerequisites and community approval. There will be categories of Spiritual Advisers according to the different requirements and ceremonies listed, also there will be levels within each category which will define how much authority is granted to perform the functions of the spiritual adviser and preside over or within ceremonies.

1. General Functions, responsibilities, and privileges of Spiritual Advisers.

  • a) Spiritual leadership and guidance
  • b) Prophesying
  • c) Healing and protecting
  • d) Conducting and facilitating ceremonies
  • e) Working positions and performing duties within ceremony
  • f) Being an example of spiritual life and living in a sacred manner
  • g) Representing F.S.I. of Colorado N.A.C. corp

2. General Qualifications and Requirements of Being a spiritual adviser.

  • a) Walking the Red Road in a sacred way: as the Spirits, the white buffalo calf woman, the ceremonies, and the sacred teachings have defined it for us, passed through the ages by medicine people, chiefs, wise ones, and our ancestors.
  • b) By living and exemplifying the sacred virtues; including the Lakota 4 sacred virtues humility, compassion, humor, and courage, and the 7 arrows of the sacred fire, Faith, Hope, Charity, justice, temperance, prudence, and Fortitude.
  • c) Carrying a Cannupa; which is received in a good way, by vision quest, marriage, Hunka, inheritance, and or by receiving as a gift from an elder or medicine person.
  • d) Doing vision quest annually; praying and fasting alone in the woods for the benefit of oneself and more importantly for the benefit of all living beings. To be in connection with Tunkasila and the spirits.
  • e) To be in good standing with the community, members, officers, and directive council. To help the community and to be of service to it. To understand the functioning of ceremonial life and to not over step boundaries, comforts, and roles of leadership within the community and positions of spiritual advisers.
  • f) Being appointed by the directive council and most importantly being ordained and or officially recognized by the Chief Spiritual adviser and the other spiritual advisers, to have formally offered tobacco or opagi* the Chief Spiritual Adviser for those specific purposes.

3. Categories and levels of Spiritual Advisers, Specific ceremonies and levels of initiation. (School for ministerial preparation)

a) Chief Spiritual Adviser. The officially ordained Spiritual Leader and medicine person of F.S.I. of Colorado N.A.C. corp. Performing and leading all functions listed above as well as fulfilling all requirements listed above, and having completed and performed all the requirements and functions as listed below

b) The Inipi, The Sweat Lodge.

  • 1st level is attending regularly the Sweat Lodge.
  • 2nd learning songs and singing with the lead of the water pourer.
  • 3rd Participating and actively helping the group before, during, and after the ceremony.
  • 4th Helping gather wood and supplies for the ceremony.
  • 5th Receiving the stones inside the Sweat Lodge.
  • 6th Tending the fire and carrying in stones during the Sweat Lodge.
  • 7th Being a regular fire tender and learning from the water pourer for an extended period of time, as seen fit by the pourer, about the purposes, protocols, songs and designs of the Sweat Lodge.
  • 8th Building and constructing a lodge or participating in the act of.
  • 9th Understanding and fulfilling the commitments of what it means and takes to pour lodge, complete 4 years of vision quest, completing 4 years of Sun Dance, carry a Cannupa, and or be recognized as qualified by the Chief Spiritual Adviser or medicine person.
  • 10th Receive official ordination and the ceremony of having water poured over the hands to pour lodge by the Chief spiritual adviser or another qualified medicine person and have community support to be seen as a leader of the ceremony.

c) Vision Quest/ Hanbleceya.

  • 1st level attending and supporting vision quest.
  • 2nd tending the fire, supporting in the kitchen, helping with childcare, helping with the Sweat Lodge and or supporting and helping with any of the recognized duties of the community in the ceremony of vision quest.
  • 3rd Supporting 4 vision quests, and or for 4 years.
  • 4th Opagi* the Chief Spiritual Adviser to ‘go on the hill’ and fast and pray in nature.
  • 5th to make the commitment of 4 years of vision quest and to fulfill that commitment.
  • 6th to help others with fulfilling their commitment and to support the Chief Spiritual Adviser with different roles in running and making happen the vision quest.
  • 7th In preparation to lead a vision quest, to complete 4 years of Vision quest, to Sun Dance or Dream dance 4 years, to lead and pour lodge, and to be specifically trained by the chief Spiritual Adviser to lead.
  • 8th To be officially seen as qualified by the Chief spiritual adviser and other spiritual advisers, to be in good standing with the community, and to have official ordination of leading the Vision Quest ceremony.

d) Sun Dance.

  • 1st level attending and supporting the Sun Dance.
  • 2nd support for 4 years and assist the sun dance camp with help in various ways or
  • 3rd to support in the kitchen and or tend the fire and help with formal duties for 4 years or to learn the songs and sing on the drum for 4 years.
  • 4th after completing roles of support and or from a vision or prompt from a medicine person making the formal commitment to dance for 4 years.
  • 5th to gather supplies and medicines, going on vision quest, and then Sun dancing.
  • 6th Completing your 4 years of dancing.
  • 7th Becoming a dance leader under the direction of the Chief Spiritual Adviser and helping with official leadership roles of the Sun Dance for 4 years.
  • 8th being specifically trained to be a sun dance chief by the Chief Spiritual Adviser or recognized medicine person and sun dance chief.
  • 9th Being officially ordained by the Chief Spiritual Adviser and Sun Dance Chief, being in good standing with the community and then being A Sun Dance Chief.

e) Yuwipi.

  • 1st level is attending the ceremony.
  • 2nd is attending regularly and helping support the ceremony.
  • 3rd actively helping with all the duties to make ceremony happen, gathering wood for the Sweat Lodge, food gathering and preparation, and helping with the set up of the ceremony.
  • 4th learning the songs.
  • 5th Singing at a ceremony.
  • 6th keeping the altar and helping the Yuwipi person with maintenance and set up of altar.
  • 7th doing vision quest 4 years, carrying a Cannupa, and receiving help from Yuwipi spirits.
  • 8th Becoming a water pourer for Sweat Lodge.
  • 9th receiving a song for the Yuwipi altar.
  • 10th leading a lowanpi/ yuwipi and being the person in the middle as ordained by the Chief Spiritual Adviser and or another recognized medicine person.

f) Dream Dance.

  • 1st level join the dream society.
  • 2nd Attending or supporting the Dream dance.
  • 3rd Dancing, tending the Fire, Singing or supporting in the many ways to make ceremony happen for 4 years and formally opagi/ offer tobacco to Dream Dance Chief.
  • 4th Perform Function as a leader of the Dream Dance for 4 years.
  • 5th Be trained By Dream Dance Chief and Chief Spiritual Adviser to lead and receive pipe for the Dream Dance.
  • 6th Be Officially Ordained and qualified by Chief Spiritual Adviser and Chief of Dream Dance to be a Dream Dance Chief, and to be recognized by the other spiritual Advisers and be in good standing with the community to lead.

g) Peyote Ceremony.

  • 1st level is to attend ceremonies.
  • 2nd is to regularly attend and support ceremonies.
  • 3rd is to learn songs and to sing as prayer in the ceremony.
  • 4th to actively participate in helping with the set up and gathering of supplies, food, and equipment necessary for the ceremony.
  • 5th To be recognized by the Roadman to work an officer position in the ceremony.
  • 6th to work the position of the Door for 1-4 years or as seen fit by the Roadman.
  • 7th To work in the position of Fire Keeper for 1-4 years or seen fit by the Roadman.
  • 8th To work in the position of Drummer for 1-4 years or as seen fit by the Roadman.
  • 9th To work in the position of Cedar Person for 1-4 years or as seen fit by the Roadman.
  • 10th To Lead Ceremony under the custodial protection of the Roadman for 1-4 years or as seen fit by the Roadman.
  • 11th Having done all the positions and meeting the qualifications and being officially recognized by the Chief Roadman and Chief Spiritual Adviser, and being in good standing with the community and all Spiritual Advisers, officially being Ordained as a Peyote Road person.

h) Ayahuaskero/ Ayahuaskara.

  • 1st Level is attending the ceremony.
  • 2nd attending regularly and supporting the ceremony.
  • 3rd learning songs.
  • 4th singing with permission in Ceremony.
  • 5th Helping with set up of the altar and helping the Ayahuaskero/a with duties and functions within the ceremony.
  • 6th helping with guidance keeping the altar for 4 years.
  • 7th To receive and participate in administering and brewing of the medicine, with permission of the Ayahuaskero/a.
  • 8th being officially recognized by the Ayahuaskero/a and Chief Spiritual Adviser as qualified and by being in good standing with the community, and then being officially ordained as an Ayahuaskero/a for the Ayahuaska medicine.

* Opagi, To offer the pipe or tobacco formally.

Spiritual Preservation

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What is the reason for spiritual preservation? In this modern age spirituality is being threatened by the quickly spreading scourge of over rationalization and disbelief. These times not only represent the mentality that goes along with the peak of the industrial age but also the Taming and domestication of the human spirit. With quantum physics in mind one can easily see where our culture is heading. We are actually cutting ourselves off from magic.  With the collective awareness of humankind being focused like a lens, it has caused us to lose sight of the bigger picture. Scientific process is good but it has become a shortsighted and insensitive act. Over intellectualization have dumbed down our emotional intelligence and have left the symbolical mind inaccessible.

This is not just speculation but scientific fact. The art of Anthropology came into being because of the changes in behavioral modifications of Industrialized culture. It is always interesting as well as alarming when a non-domestic peoples are able to perceive things that domesticated people cannot. What is most alarming is that people are not using the same parts of the brain that they used to. Imagination is failing quickly among the children and it has been found that we even hear things differently. Wild animals cannot interpret digital audio recordings like modern humans.

Aldous Huxley’s brave new world is upon us and few can even see it coming. Most people are so excited to have new comforts and luxuries that they don’t care about at what expense. Like domesticated animals, we are becoming more analytical and not necessarily more intelligent. The analytical mind is practically synonymous with sociopathic dysfunction. We all know the difference between a wild mouse and a caged lab mouse, also how the behavior of the buffalo is in stark contrast to domestic cattle. We all know what happens to a wild animal when you cage it, it becomes necrotic, a condition that does not exist in the wild.

We all know about the delicate balance of nature as well as the human mind, what is to become of a species who has lost touch with the symbolical mind. What will happen to mankind with no sense of magic and no ability to assume or imagine anything outside of “rational” boundary’s. The very act of spiritual expression depends on all of these factors, but this is just one of numerous concerns for our possible future.

We owe a great dept to the profound foresight of our ancestors, not just intellectually but through their hopes and dreams for us now. In the same way that people would make sacrifices for rain and abundant crops, they would pray for the availability of food and water for the coming generations. This and many other practices have dramatically ceased. much of our fate relied upon the projections of our ancestors, all of a sudden it is all seen as foolish superstition. Wild attributes can return quickly and intuition is a very powerful force but lets look at what is happening to peoples sense of family and humanity.

The most detrimental thing to spirituality is the domestication of mankind, not just from a mental point of view, but from a physical point of view. It is always interesting to observe a person who has never ventured far from the side walk, while traipsing through the Forrest. It can be very difficult for a city person to move through the brush on uneven ground. In the same way it can be difficult to maneuver spiritually for the closed minded individual. What I mean is the act of non-physical movement.

My greatest concern for the future of religion is our disconnection from nature. I should also add that domesticated religion seems to have no use for nature and is inherently academic. Imagine if you will having to ark weld on the moon to pay your oxygen bills. What would it be like for someone to have robotic implanted body parts to improve ones work skills. These things are not much different than the present. Will mankind manifest an industrial horror for the future. If we proceed without religious freedom and and without a sense of magic we will create a miserable existence for the future.

Regardless of the advent of science, people need the awe and mystery of the spiritual. Magic is hardwired into our system, we need it along with spontaneity and imagination. Humans and all animals thrive with a certain types of stresses and fail under perfected conditions. We had a person ask us if they could take breaks from a Peyote Ceremony because the fire was smoky. I said no, the smoke is part of the experience. If we were to eliminate the fire we would take it’s power away and begin the domestication process. Some scientists surmise that humans may have become intelligent because of the stresses of smoky fires.

We have the opportunity to create a wonderful new world, lets not de-claw the human race in the process. Why are corporations training people to stand in lines? out of convenience? We should reward originality and unpredictably and we should have in mind a holistic and ecological approach to technology. Laws should protect human rights ,freedom of conscience and assembly from domestication!

The Spirit

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 THE SPIRIT

Fossilized footprint

Fossilized footprint

The term “Spirit” is used in many ways in the English language. When you hear it you may think of the life force responsible for giving the body life. You may think of a supernatural being, a ghost or of one’s disposition, being spirited or having “team spirit”. All of these can be attributed to the the same thing, if we could call it a thing. It is Interesting that there is a word for something that is formless and intangible. Often times the thought of the spirit or the spiritual is seen as being in the realm of fantasy, a fictitious imaginary “thing”. The reason for disbelief in the spirit is simply because it cannot be sensed, detected or measured.

Scientists may detect and measure subatomic particles but they cannot detect the formless. A clairvoyant may sense a ghost but cannot sense the formless (a ghost has form). It could be said that the spirit is an essence but that description is still insufficient. The Elders say that for everything visible, there is also an invisible counterpart but this is not in reference to the spirit. This is in reference to the soul. Everything has an ethereal form as well as a physical form, even modern science can attest to that. The Elders tell us of the soul, the old belief that the soul has many parts that do many different things.

Unlike contemporary christian belief, we understand the soul as having four distinct parts. One can be compared to your reflection, another can be compared to your reflection mirrored within the pupil of your eye, yet another aspect of your soul can be seen as being like your shadow. The fourth part of the soul can be thought of as a mirror or a reflective surface. None of these aspects of the soul are in reference to the spirit but this fourth part does describe the location of the Spirit. The Spirit is the reflection of God upon the mirror of the soul.

Many people don’t know the difference between the Spirit and the soul. The body has the soul as it’s ethereal counterpart.The soul is not what gives us life, the soul is like the body. The body is an organic machine made of atoms, molecules and cells. Similarly, the soul is a machine made of sub-atomic particles, a super computer far more complex and stable than the body. What animates the soul and body is the spirit.

Everything has an unseen counterpart every grain of sand gives off and takes in trillions of subatomic particles every second (according to science). You could say that everything is alive in some form or another. Once I asked a famous medicine man if he believed in extraterrestrial life, visitors from outer space. He said, sure there are about 1000 meteorites that enter our atmosphere every day, the Stone Nations visit us all the time. That’s true, in fact, the Earth acquires about 100 tons of rock per day on average!

The Elders tell us that all things are filled with Spirit and that everything has a Spirit. The Spirit is inexhaustible immeasurable and it has no form. All of us know these things with out knowing how we know them. We all know that everything came from the spirit, that it is the origin of everything. People who believe in the Spirit see it as the ultimate truth. We all seem to agree that it is indestructible and everlasting, we also know that there is but one Spirit. One Spirit that reflects upon all of our souls and gives each one of us life. The spirit could be said to be the fuel of our soul, that which animates us.

Life can be said to be a dance between positive and negative, light and shadow, day and night. all substance seems to be held together by the positive and negative attraction of atoms, everything that science knows is about these Ones and Zeros that compose everything. The unknown factor is the spirit, like dusk and dawn it stands between the day and night. Skanskan, the Creator, is the movement from one moment to the next, the dance of time. There is not really just this duality, there is a function of 3 elements at play here and one of them is invisible and formless! This spiritual element is not time, it stands between time, it allows one moment to lead to another. There is no real way to speak of the Spirit and yet we somehow can speak of it, part of the understanding of it is intuitive.

We say that we are all related, Mitaku Oyasin, My relations, all of them. It is true that all humans have but one common mother, even science will attest to this but that is not what is meant by Mitakuye Oyasin. In essence this statement means that we are related to all that there is and not just because we are made out of one substance but because we all share the same Spirit. We are body, soul and spirit, only three steps away from the source of all. Why then do we seek outside of our selves to find the spiritual?

We all instinctively know the truth. We know that the center of the universe is within us and that the whole cosmos is reflected within every cell of our bodies. Likewise we all know that each one of us carry’s a secret within, a divine mystery, the secret of the spirit. Not everything should be known to us but it is true that although you have your own body and soul, we all share the same spirit and therefore, we are each other.

One spirit fuels and touches each experience through all of us, through everything, until eternity has been fulfilled. Then something even more interesting happens. After infinity it reviews everything from another perspective, without time, space or any point of perspective, without a vantage point! This is happening now, somehow the Spirit is everywhere and somewhere else at the same time, deifying time, space. It is outside of math and logic, science cannot prove it nor disprove it. It has no gender, no shape, no color. It is in equal measure every where, even nowhere, in the void, within nothingness.

There is the age old question, why are we here? We are contributing to eternity, we are reaching the totality of all possibilities, that place in the future when everything has been done or at least imagined. This place at the end of time when omnipotence is reached. What is greater than omnipotence but to forget and savor the flavor of the moment?

 

 

Native American Spirituality

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During the Industrial Revolution Native American Culture was persecuted to the point of near extinction. Unknown to most scholars, American Indians would have suffered total genocide had it not been for Christian protests, Theologians, Religious lobbyists and Lawyers. It was public outrage that saved the American Indian, not our prowess on the battlefield.

In the 1890’s, James Mooney, an anthropologist from the Smithsonian Institution, attended Peyote meetings among the Kiowa and the Tarahumara. Finally, in 1918, after testifying in favor of American Indians at Congressional hearings, Mooney advised various tribes to obtain a legal charter to protect their religious freedom. With Mooney’s help, the Native American Church was officially incorporated in 1918. Today it is the most widespread Native  American religion in the world.

When most people think of Indigenous American Spiritual practices they think of the The Sun Dance, Vision Quest and Sweat Lodge. These ceremonials are gaining in popularity but are actually very rare. Very few Sun Dances exist, with around only 300 annual Dances. For the Native American Church on the other hand, there are probably a minimum of 300 Ceremonies every weekend in North America. That sounds like a lot, and compared to The Lakota Sun Dance and Sweat Lodge, it is. For the most part, Indigenous Spirituality is very rare.

Most Native Americans are Christian. There are indigenous spiritual traditions in the United States, The majority of them are very small groups and are very secretive. The Hopi spiritual tradition is literally held together by a handful of people.These great traditions are dwindling because the younger generations are not willing to take part in them and because the elders are not willing to share them outside of their own tribes.

Indigenous Spirituality is wrought with problematic issues. Like most spiritual organizations, many people are attracted to them for the wrong reasons. There are many people who Sun Dance who are alcoholic and have other addictions. There are Native American Church members of 20 years who are not genuinely spiritual. This is an issue in many spiritual paths. On a positive note, Native Traditions have served to attract people from all walks of life to make major changes in there lives and taught many to pray and behave themselves in a spiritual manner when they would not do so otherwise.

The beauty of the Red Road and it’s spiritual journey rests in it’s ability to empower the individual. The seeker is to find his or her’s own answers through a direct connection with the divine. Not to say that there are no intermediaries or leaders, there are. Seekers must push forward on their own steam and make real and personal sacrifices for the spiritual connection. No one can do that for you, your spirituality rests upon you alone and that is a truly universal truth.

No matter what sacrifices you have made, how many dances you have completed, how many ceremonies you have attended, the fact remains that your connection is within you and is dependent only upon your personal effort. Spirituality is an internal process. You may have the great fortune of sharing and celebrating that expression with others within a group, but the genuine connection always occurs within.

At some point the light of spiritual awakening dawns within. At this point one may become aware that others are not sincere and may be involved for selfish reasons. This is an inherent problem in all spirituality everywhere and is all too evident in Native America. Spirituality is a process, so it is very important not to be in a place of judgement.  A path may have attracted someone with the romanticism of Native heritage or the allure of ancient mystic practices. Medicines like Peyote and Ayahuasca attract many people, some are beckoned by narcotic curiosity alone. Whatever the case may be, at some point the seeker is faced with the inevitable spiritual dilemma of one’s own divine connection.

Most American Indian Spiritual leaders hold other spiritual paths in the highest regard and are not in judgement of race. In this day and age it is of utmost importance for all religions to have respect for one another and to learn from one another as well. It is crucial now for us to see the bigger picture, far above our cultural influence and personal opinions is the bigger picture. What is the Center of the Universe’s view on Native Spirituality as opposed to anything else? What does God think about what kind of spiritual group you are a part of? what is important to our Mother Earth in terms of how we pray?

In Indigenous American spiritually we say that “there is no wrong or right way to pray” and “don’t make someone wrong for praying”. When involved in the task of spirituality it is important to keep a clear and unhindered perspective. beyond every thing you think you know, there is the reality of your connection to the divine. It is essential to strip your self of illusions about spirituality, to lay bare and honest ones intentions on the path.

Indigenous spirituality does this very well, but, for the spiritual seeker we advise you to learn everything you can about spirituality. Keep your mind as open as you can. All spiritual paths should lead to the same place and most of them may have some piece of the puzzle. Tolerance between the worlds’ religions may be the key for all of us to having a better relationship with the divine. Try for a moment to disregard the human concept of god and imagine Gods’ perspective of the whole issue.

There should be less emphasis on form and more emphasis on function. Having a pipe (Canupa) means nothing without being on the other end of it with a prayer. Whatever path you follow, others will criticize you for that and if we are to reach world peace , the criticisms need to come to an end. Tolerance, respect and love are what the spiritual paths teach and even an atheist will agree that these things are great. If you are on the Red Road don’t forget why you do what you do.

The Sacred





 

August 2013 014

We live in a world of rapid change, of changing priorities and changes in our perception. Have we as humans recorded this change, Have we measured the the passage of our perceptual change? How much has the light of knowledge dawned and to what degree have the shadows receded? We know there has been a change in the world around us, so what of the change within us? What is the spiritual significance of this change in our lives, for spiritual people?

For the spiritual seeker there is a clear distinction of what is sacred and that which is mundane. Our beliefs and our experience determine the degree and the extents of the boundary of the sacred. It is our perception of the sacred that defines the world around us, not only for the spiritual seeker, but for us all. The way we feel about things, our opinions and our perception paint the world around us. Perception is everything to us and it determines the quality of our life.

To our forefathers and mothers, the world around them was traced with certain dividing lines. There were places of great holiness according to the stories of old. There have always been those geological wonders that inspire in humankind a sense of divinity. Places, that according to the creation stories were blessed from some  divine event. Likewise, in the desolate waste land there exists a not so sacred place, perhaps a place of danger that is to be avoided. Perhaps a place condemned by myth.

For untold thousands of years we have lived with this precept of that which is sacred and that which is profane. In the minds of all of our ancestors were the dividing lines of varying degrees of sacredness, of sacred space. The ancestors listened to the teachings of the elders of the sacred center, Hocoka Wakan. Like the top of the sacred mountain. Not just the mountain that is sacred, but its’ summit. That pristine untouched place, pure and undefiled by man.

The lesson of the medicine wheel is one of sacred space and in it’s center is that neutral ground, the origin of all. From every place in the wheel the center remains, the scenery changes and our awareness of the center changes yet it is still the center. This central point represents the first place, the creators’ first perception, its’ first vantage point. I am here! This is the time before time and it deals with space, the center of the universe!

In all ceremonies you will find such a space, hallowed ground upon the altar, maybe even too divine to touch, like the sacred mountains’ peak! One can locate such places easily, even to the untrained eye looking within the center of the Sweat Lodge or out to the center of the Sun Dance. The elders tell us of the wisdom of walking with sacred foot steps from this center into the rest of our lives. Every foot step taken in humility and respect in a sacred way upon our holy mother earth. Here we define the limits of sacred space, push the boundaries of divinity with our own respect and love for Mother Earth.

In the Creation stories emerge all that there is from the center and then space is measured and divided as the body of the divine mother, made out of the very primordial essence of the Creator. So here we have that level of sacredness that pervades all space, with every thing as sacred and not merely by virtue of its’ origin but also by virtue of its existence. It is sacred because it is, because it is not void. Void, then, could represent the mundane, the boring, even with the understanding that these are special too. There is this sense then, that a cursed place of wondering ghosts and wicked spirits is within the realm of this holy creation even though it is profane and cursed.

Here we venture into the realm of consecration, the act of forgiving a place. This is the idea of lifting a curse on a broken space, of filling the void of desolation with love and the acknowledgement if its divine origins. In the act of forming the altar of soil we consecrate it and by showing its center with the placement of the staff or blessed object we affirm the center of the universe and the origins of all space. Making a place a physical representation of the creation stories, redeeming a mundane place by acknowledging it as part of the goddess’s body.

With our minds we cast the divisions of sacred places even into modern day. The most non-spiritually focused person will still have that special warmth for ones place of birth. Affinity for ones childhood home and places of play are sacred within the mind of desacralized man. De-sacralized : to have removed the aura of sacredness from; secularize. For those with no concept of holiness, some things are still definitely special and for them, and therefore, sacred.

Within all creation myth is that sacred point of beginning which is marked by the center. From that center something very special happens, Movement! Like the center of the Aztec calendar we can see the central glyph of Ollin, motion, the Lakota God, Skanskan. This speaks of movement that came from stillness and stagnation, time that elapsed after timelessness. Just as form came from the void, motion came to the stagnant.

Here we have another thing that can be measured and perceived. Like space, it is the quality of our perception that determines the relativity of time. If you are waiting in vain for a very late friend, that time spent can be downright nasty, not sacred! Finally when the point of meeting with your friend and joy begins, time quickens and is savored as sacred in every cherished movement.

In essence, the act of ceremony is the re-enactment of the creation stories. The religious rite is now enacting the dawn of time and space. In the Sweat Lodge, Yuwipi, Sun Dance and every spiritual rite in every sane and sacred tradition one can find this division of sacred time and space. For the ancestors, the beginning of time was a holy time and the act of ceremony transformed the mundane time into sacred time, The consecration of time!

Our ancestors had a lot of sacred time. The four sacred divisions of the day and night, the dawn of light being the beginning of time and a space between time. The midday when the shadows are smallest and mark the apex of the sun, then dusk in its calmness and rest, also a space between time. Then midnight ( some say 2 or 4) when all is at rest and the Eagle is said to take a drink of water and the Mole ascends to feel the air. As it is with space, in the big picture we can see that all time could be seen as sacred by virtue of it not being non-movement.

For the Spiritual, time is a sacred movement of Great Mystery from beginning to end, from the time of the creators first awareness until the very fulfillment of that awareness all the way into omnipotence! From the first motion until that point that every thing that could have been done, moved and realized has been done. So the ancestors listened to the wisdom of the storyteller account that each passing moment in this life is to be lived in respect and honor and that each transition from one moment into the next is a sacred dance of the divine.

To modern man time is limited and not as vast as it was for his ancestors. It is measured by its limit and not by its infinity. For him time is running out and he is waiting, waiting for that place in time that, to him , is sacred. We live in a time where special time exists in leisure, after work. For our ancestors work was sacred, ritual drama and thought were seen as sacred acts and not as mundane things. To the original ancestors, leisure was more mundane than the hunt and the work.

Rather than speculating through the lens of our myopic spiritual opinions, let us look at what can be measured and counted with scientific processes. The elders speak of vast expanses of space and time as being sacred, The Sacred Mountains. Now they are seen more as national resources and places of leisure rather than the breasts of Mother Earth. Time can be counted for the domestic human in terms of seconds, minutes and hours rather than by experiences.

For industrialized humans, all time is mundane until those special moments finally arrive. Now the sacred has become the weekend, the party and for him the only true rituals are weddings and funerals. Most of the time is in passing now and in wait for something not boring. Such sacred events such as giving birth have been reduced to a medical procedure. The holiest of holy, in women’s time, the menses or moon-time is seen with shame and embarrassment, especially the first Moon-Time. Time is slipping away for the domestic human, and yet it is a dance for the aboriginal. Time always seems to be running out for those attempting to not be late and for Industrial man, death awaits him to mark the end.

Lets look at the modern spiritual seeker and domestic man on the timely path of salvation and redemption. Here we can easy measure that sacred time has been scheduled as a day of the week and sacred space has been confined to the inside of a church building! Even for the religious, the sacred has receded, it has been extracted from within the home. The personal shrine within the home and hearth and has been placed behind lock and key under the charge of a “spiritual middle man” who will intercede with God on you behalf. The spiritual path has devolved into an academic pursuit rather than being measured in terms of experience alone.

At the center of spirituality as well as life it’s self is our perception and our perception determines what we are aware of. Like all domesticated animals, we are focusing on our thought rather then our emotions. domestication is where neurosis are born and the mind prods and judges the feelings (which is the reverse for the untamed). The intellect is over shadowing bodily awareness and it can be proven scientifically. At the expense of our direct instinct we seem to be trading our knowing-ness for reflection, thinking about things.

Our modern cultures’  pursuit of intelligence may cost us our symbolical mind altogether. The symbolical mind has receded into our subconscious with the increase of language, meaning that we think more and more with words and less and less with symbols. This allows humans to be more intellectual at the expense of our ability to directly perceive things. This is scientific fact. What people are not measuring scientifically (anthropologically), are the changes in spiritual experience among domestic culture.

We now live in a world where the earth itself is seen as profane and something to be harnessed and dominated. With our perception we paint the world around us and as we open our minds to rationalization we can also be seen as closing our our minds to the Spiritual. The spirit is outside of math, measurement and logic. The spiritual defies the mind just as the void defies form. The Sacred is becoming superstition and collectively the human race is shutting itself off from non-rational possibilities. “Miracles” are quickly becoming “impossibilities”.

It is up to us to keep the dream alive and who knows what fate awaits our kind? Do not rely too heavily upon the mind. Many wonderful things are coming from the organization of human affairs, let’s not cast ourselves into the mundane in the process. Hold on to the magic unbridled, release everything you think you know and deify the unnatural ways though which you have been conditioned. Arrive alive in sacred space and time. Here and now, everywhere and forever! Shine as brightly as you can.

Show Father sky and Mother Earth your urgency, live life aloud and rise above your petty comfort zones. Resist being comforted into a state of complacency, refuse being lulled away into the suckling comforts of domesticated inertia. Fight and overcome what is rightfully yours as humans, for the wildness and unpredictable spirit untamed. Reclaim what you really want of your selves, feel the power of Nature and the timeless connection to the very center of all that is. You are an Immortal being, fearless and impervious to everything on this earth.

Claw through your thin domestic veneer and be who you were always meant to be. Come alive and face the storm with abandon. Show some backbone in your life and roar aloud! Be bold and real, stop cradling your precious internal dialog and false self image. Go beyond all that and break through to your savage, real and animal connection to your Mother Earth.

Aho Mitaku Oyasin!

 

SPIRIT HELPERS

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SPIRIT HELPERS

With a basic understanding of Comparative Religion, it is easy to see that spiritual traditions are all fundamentally the same. Especially with respect to the major deities. No matter your tradition, you focus upon the center of the universe and the source of all life. All religions and spiritual paths inherently celebrate the same thing really. Aside from the obvious creator/creatrix, there are the spirit helpers, Angels, messengers, immortals (saints) and spiritual intermediaries.logo FSICC,9

A Spiritual Helper can be several things. First and foremost is the idea that one of the major deities of the creation stories is presiding over you and helping you. Secondly, there are the Messengers, those beings who carry our prayers to the Major Deities / Gods and Goddesses so that they might hear them and eventually answer them.

The messengers are Divine beings. Regardless of your tradition and what you think you know, these Divine beings can be many things, Angelic beings (Wakinyan), Fairies (canotila) and Little People (Wiwila). All of these messengers have a few things in common. They were all created to work for the Gods and Goddesses (Collectively known as Wakan Kin), and do not procreate as we do.

Then, lastly, there are the Spirit helpers in the form of Immortals. Immortals are many different beings. These are the saints, or mortals who have attained special power by fortifying their souls. In most Indigenous traditions, these can be humans, animals and other mortal beings that have transcended their limitations. These are the Spirit Helpers that make one tradition different from another. This type of spirit helper is what makes a tradition different than no tradition. and this is what I want to talk about here.

Some descriptions of Native American saints are wrongly labeled as ghosts. What is known as the Ghost Nations, can be more accurately described as Immortals. This concept is not limited to humans and can be an animal, plant or other being that has attained enlightenment. For example, a great bear of the forest may somehow be granted power for some brave selfless act and thereby attain sainthood.

In all of this is the idea that some Immortals are better than others to have as Spiritual Helpers. Immortals are important and unique in that they can tell you things and help you as a friend. The eagle can see where the buffalo are and show you how to find them. The Human immortal can speak and give advice.

In the Lakota language, all of these Spirit helpers, as well as any divine beings, are known as Tunkasila. Roughly translated this means grandfather, but the term is applied in a genderless way. When someone says “Wakan Tanka, Tunkasila”, it can be understood as Creator, Spirit helper. A female Immortal would still be referred to as Tunkasila because the spirit world is somewhat more genderless than the physical realms. Tunkasila are the ancestors, whether they be the gods, Goddesses, gnomes, fairies, stones, trees or whatever.

In Native American traditions people speak of animal totems. This has to do with family ties to the animal nations. It is believed that far in the past most humans and animals could change their species. Humans could transform themselves into animals and animals could become humans. There are still a few individuals that can do this. This is known as shape shifting. As the story goes, humans and animals intermarried creating ancestral inter-species relations.

Ones’ animal totem has to do with an ancestral link with a particular animal. most people can see, when looking at a family, what animal is more prevalent. You can tell which parent past on the animal of their family to their children. The bear is a very prevalent family totem among all humans. This is so because bears came from humans. In the same way that it is believed that humans came from primates, we believe that bears come from people. That is why many tribes won’t eat Bear meat, it is considered cannibalism. Likewise, a medicine woman who works with the buffalo or has a strong family connection to the buffalo, will not eat buffalo meat.

A healer may have an ancestral link to the Elk nation, yet may have a “ghost” Spirit Helper of the mountain lion (for example). Inherently  a totem animal is a spirit helper of sorts, in that there is a connection to another nation, as relatives.

All beings are created in the image and likeness of the creator, on earth as it is in heaven, as above, so below. That’s true for everything and every event we experience. In Lakota philosophy this is known as Gapemini. For every visible/physical thing there is an invisible/ethereal counterpart. Likewise, for the creator to make the trees, it would have first had something like a tree within itself (for example). So, all trees have an over-soul, an angelic being “Tree” after which all trees were modeled.

There then is a messenger or angelic being representing of all forms of life in the universe. In the Lakota belief there are then 405 angels. That is why we make 405 tobacco prayer ties for the Hanbleceya (Vision Quest Ceremony).This is to address them all, perhaps only one or two of them will come to hear our prayers, but they are all invited. It is interesting to note that in European Christian lore, the Angels started to be depicted as humans (and as males), when in the original biblical descriptions, they are combined animal forms and never depicted as people.

Whatever the case may be, there are many types of helpful spirits. what I am wanting to focus on are the spirits that make one altar more effective than another. The reason why ancient traditions are more effective than domestic, contemporary traditions, is because they have more seniority and more validity with the founders of the universe.

People of our modern culture have difficulty understanding this concept. Those who do experiment with different spiritual paths, usually settle for something more tame and comfortable. These times are forging a whole new era of simplified, domestic religious systems. The problem with this is purely metaphysical and has little to do with doctrine or philosophy. It has to do with who you know and what kind of connections you have (spiritually).

Suppose you wanted a job as an executive for a large business. You would have to get credentials, get the right kind of education. The person hiring you would have to actually like you, You couldn’t just act like a jerk and expect to get the job. You would have to show that you have the skills to communicate by communicating in the right way. Suppose you got the job, you would have to learn who is who and fit into the pecking order And it would be of utmost importance to go through the proper channels.

As it is in the spiritual world, Just like anything else, it is all about who you know, the friends you make and your ability to forge and maintain good relations. A medicine man may gain a few Spirit helpers in his lifetime. This is within the context that he has a 26 thousand year old tradition backing him up. A tradition that forms a collective of Spiritual immortals that could not be achieved in any other way.

When someone just starts a new religion it will not have the power that an ancient tradition has. Most people in our culture would never even know the difference. In Indigenous Traditions, miraculous events are commonplace. Contemporary traditions scoff at this, claiming that it is the work of evil spirits. Some of the most powerful traditions of this earth have been massacred under this pretext.

When a ceremony is about to begin some of the The spirit Helpers are signaled by the activity itself, others are called from far away with songs. It is said that we were given intelligence and a voice originally for the communication with spirits. Some how we are so busy talking to ourselves or each other that we barely notice the spirits nowadays. All animals may use their voices to speak to one another, but if you pay close attention, you can catch them in the act of calling out to the very center of the universe, praying.

The Messengers or Angelic Beings are likewise specially attuned to the human voice. They were designed to hear us, to help us, as part of our birthright. An audio recording of Incantations to a spirit will not conjure that spirit, only the true voice will do that. If you have been praying for something and it has not come to pass, perhaps you haven’t spoken your prayer out loud. Many spirits may be able to read your mind, but not necessarily the messengers meant to carry your prayers.

It is interesting to notice, if you pay close attention to a spirit that is listening to a person’s prayer. notice what happens when the normal speech of the prayer breaks into a shaky crying voice. The spirit reacts with great urgency! Perhaps this is why in some spiritual traditions, prayers are recited, purposefully, in a shaky, weeping tone.

 Many spirits recognize any rite as being a ritual, especially by the presence of fire and water,  fire and water are part of what forms a doorway for spiritual beings. Just to make up a ritual one may attract attention but that is not always a good thing.  When a leader of an ancient tradition of any kind presides over a ceremony, he or she calls a group of spirits specific to that tradition.  To lead a made up ceremony may call upon one’s individual spirit or ones own ancestors.  When calling ancestors you should be aware of many things, as an example, when they show up, they may be angered by the breaking of some family taboo.  It may be something long forgotten by you in the present.

For example, if you have family ties to the Deer Nation, and your family was forbidden to eat deer for thousands of years, but somehow lost that ancestral vow, you could be in quite a fix when that spirit shows up. If your ancestors made any agreement with the spirits you would have to remedy that in the present, after all, you are here on behalf of your ancestors and therefore have somewhat of a responsibility to them.

Some spirits of one tradition may not jibe with the spirits of another.  In most all religions and systems of magic, it is understood that whatever you offer you attract. If you offer alcohol, you will attract spirits that like that stuff. Don’t offer Buffalo kidney to a vegetarian Hindu goddess! this represents what we call the mixing of medicines.

In the Voodoo tradition,  for instance, you will notice altars of conflicting deities are kept separate and not crossed. Different and even enemy forces of nature my be honored by one person, yet their altars are not lumped together like some new-age mishmash. These things are subtle to us, but very important to them.

When someone becomes a Medicine Man or Woman it is because they are initiated in a true tradition, regardless of anything else.  Whatever the case, a position like that exists because a group of spirits are assigned to a person by another person according to that tradition.  By merely understanding Native American spirituality by itself one may not  necessarily enlist the help of those spirits. There has to be an unbroken line of tradition making the connection.

As an example, from the Catholic tradition one can see then, the emergence of the Protestant faith. This is an interesting example because the protestants actually cut themselves off from the Catholic saints. Aside from God, the other major deities and the Angels, the protestants basically had to start from scratch. Over time they gained Spirit Helpers.

Keep in mind that there really is no wrong or right way to pray. The creation herself is the body of the goddess. No one goes unheard. We are all inherently connected to the source of all that is. No matter what wrongs we commit we are all inextricably connected to the creator. We are made out of the very substance of god and cannot even escape our divinity if we tried. It is a reality that we, as beings, can offend the spirits in the same way we could offend each other and even ourselves. Part of any Indigenous tradition relies upon the adherence to ancestral vows.

Nevertheless, though beings may take many forms and many bodies, we have one spirit. There is one force fueling all perception and that is the one thing beyond math and comprehension. The fabric of the universe is woven with one thread! Each one of us, and everything, has a direct connection to Wakan Tanka.

What makes a Tradition powerful is it’s collective of spiritual Helpers, particularly the immortals. Spirituality is the same with anything else. There is a structure and order to all things. When we are born, we work hard to learn to move. We learn slowly to stand, walk, Talk and everything else. the same thing goes with the spiritual path. We can’t just walk right after being born. In the spiritual life is no different.

A true spiritual tradition is characterized by it’s saints or Immortals. When a person claims to have spiritual power outside of a traditional context it is actually very rare.  There are many who take up a priest like position alone, like the new-age shaman or the solitary practitioner among neo-paganism.  The problem here lies in the issue that one person cannot enlist the help of enough spirits to form a group of spirits that characterize a true tradition.  The spirits of Native American spirituality in general are a culmination of thousands of lifetimes of spiritual work, sometimes more.

Being a Medicine Man or Woman is not dependent on what you know or how you behave.  Those factors do determine how long you keep that power.  Like many indigenous paths, a two way communication with the spirits is inherent.  This allows everyone to be informed directly rather than from written or oral instruction.  As you can imagine all this could be very dangerous without a traditional connection to a living lineage.

What does enlist the help of spiritual forces regardless of anything are the making of offerings.  A personal sacrifice, changing your behavior, leaving behind your ugly old ways or putting water out for your ancestors.  This is something that anyone can do and is probably the best thing to do to form spiritual alliances.

Powwow Songs

 

Saguache Powwow Songs

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PowWow

 

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Native American Church Songs

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In bloom

What we Believe

PETA WAKANPETA WAKAN

VISION STATEMENT

 TO BE A COMMUNITY WHICH AUTHENTICALLY PROMOTES AND SUSTAINS: TRADITIONAL INDIGENOUS AMERICAN RITUALS AND CEREMONIES; AWARENESS OF AND PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE OF GOOD LAND AND WATER STEWARDSHIP; HARMONIOUS LIVING WITH ALL BEINGS AND NATURE THROUGH A SELF-SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY. OUR VISION IS TO SUSTAIN, ADMINISTER, PROTECT, FACILITATE, SPREAD, EDUCATE, EXERCISE AND EXPRESS TO AND FOR ALL PEOPLES THE INDIGENOUS AND ABORIGINAL RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES, WAYS OF SPIRITUAL EXPRESSION, AND WAYS OF LIVING IN HARMONY WITH THE EARTH, EACH OTHER, AND GOD, WAKAN TANKA.





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MISSION STATEMENT

OUR MISSION IS TO PROVIDE AUTHENTIC TRADITIONAL INDIGENOUS CEREMONIES AND RITUALS. OUR COMMUNITY WILL BE ORGANIZED FOR THE EXPRESSION OF INDIGENOUS SPIRITUALITY AND TO PROVIDE RELIGIOUS, SPIRITUAL AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR ALL PEOPLES WILLING TO LIVE IN A SACRED WAY.

 

PURPOSE STATEMENT

 WE PRESERVE INDIGENOUS CEREMONY AND RITUAL, BECAUSE IT IS AN ENDANGERED SPIRITUAL PRACTICE.  WE WANT TO HELP HUMANKIND BY PROMOTING AND ENSURING THE SANCTITY OF THESE TRADITIONS BECAUSE WE BELIEVE THEY ARE IMPORTANT FOR OURSELVES, FUTURE GENERATIONS, AND FOR THE SPIRIT; FOR THE HEALTH OF HUMANITY AND OUR PLANET. WE PROMOTE ACTIVITIES THAT NOURISH, STIMULATE, AND FURTHER DEVELOP HUMAN CREATIVITY THROUGH SPIRITUAL EXPRESSION, CULTURAL IDENTITY, CULTURAL ART, AND HISTORICAL CONSCIOUSNESS, AS WELL AS TO PROMOTE UNIFICATION OF ALL CULTURAL RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL WORKERS. WE HELP BY TEACHING PRAYER TECHNOLOGIES AND OFFERING WORKSHOPS, CLASSES, RETREATS AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS. WE ARE A LIVING EXAMPLE OF A HARMONIOUS AND SELF-SUSTAINING COMMUNITY.

 

STATEMENT OF FAITH

MITAKUYE OYASIN/ALL OUR RELATIONS

 WE BELIEVE THAT WE ARE ALL RELATED.  WE ARE ALL SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF GOD, REGARDLESS OF RACE, CREED, COLOR, AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION.  WE ARE ALL RELATED TO EACH OTHER AS HUMANS. WE ARE ALL RELATED TO THE ANIMALS, THE TWO LEGGED, FOUR LEGGED, WINGED, AND ALL CREATION. WE ARE ALL IN TURN RELATED TO THE EARTH, SKY, AND ALL THAT THERE IS AND THAT WE COME FROM THE STARS.  AS INTELLIGENT BEINGS, WE ARE OBLIGATED TO ACT RESPONSIBLY AS STEWARDS OF ALL CREATION.

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WAKAN TANKA/GOD

 WE BELIEVE IN THE ONE GOD, THE GREAT MYSTERY, WAKAN TANKA.  AS EVERYTHING HE IS FOUR DIVISIBLE BY FOUR AND AGAIN DIVISIBLE INTO THE SIXTEEN GREAT POWERS OF THE UNIVERSE: CHIEF GOD, GREAT SPIRIT, CREATOR, EXECUTIVE, STONE, EARTH, SKY, SUN, THUNDER BEINGS, BEAUTIFUL ONE, WIND, MOON, BUFFALO, BEAR, FOUR WINDS, AND WHIRLWIND. THE SIXTEEN EACH DIVISIBLE BY FOUR INFINITELY INTO ALL THERE IS, KNOWN, UNKNOWN AND UNKNOWABLE.

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CHANUNPA/SACRED PIPE

 WE BELIEVE IN OUR PRAYERS, IN THE POWER OF THE SACRED PIPE, AND THE WHITE BUFFALO CALF MAIDEN WHO BROUGHT THE PIPE TO THE EARTH FOR ALL IT’S PEOPLE.  WE BELIEVE IN HER TEACHINGS, HER BLESSING POWER AND THE PROMISE OF HER RETURN.

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INIPI WAKAN/SWEAT LODGE

 WE BELIEVE IN THE PURIFYING AND CLEANSING POWER OF THE SWEAT LODGE CEREMONY, THE SACRIFICE MADE BY THE STONE NATION, THE TUNKASILA (SPIRITS), AND BY ALL THE PARTICIPANTS. WE BELIEVE IN PRAYING WITHIN THIS MOTHER’S WOMB FOR SOBRIETY, CLARITY, GUIDANCE, AND HEALTH.

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HANBLECEYA/VISION QUEST

 WE BELIEVE THAT THE EVERLASTING WORD OF GOD IS SPOKEN FROM EVERY PART OF DIVINE CREATION, THAT THROUGH NATURE AND THE SACRIFICE OF THE VISION QUEST RITE THE GREAT MYSTERY SPEAKS TO US ALL DIRECTLY WITHOUT EXCEPTIONS, INTERMEDIARIES, OR INTERPRETERS.

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YUWIPI – LOWANPI/NIGHT SING

 WE BELIEVE IN THE NIGHT SING, THE POWER OF INYAN/STONE, THE MIRACULOUS HEALING POWER OF THE ANCESTORS AND THE SACRED SONGS. WE BELIEVE IN THE WIWILA/LITTLE PEOPLE, ANIMAL SPIRITS, AND THE VARIOUS OTHER TUNKASILA/SPIRITS. WE BELIEVE IN THE EMPTINESS OF THE MEDICINE MAN/WOMAN AS A HOLLOW BONE FOR THE SPIRITS’ WORK.

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WIYANG WACIPI/SUN DANCE

 WE BELIEVE IN THE ANNUAL SUNDANCE, THE PIPE, THE SACRIFICE OF THE SACRED COTTONWOOD TREE, THE POWER OF THE SUN, AND THE ETERNAL FLAME.  WE BELIEVE THAT THE SACRIFICES OF THE DANCERS, SINGERS, AND SUPPORTERS BENEFITS AND PURIFIES ALL THE PEOPLE.

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ALL NIGHT PRAYER VIGILS/TIPI MEETINGS 

WE BELIEVE IN THE SACRED FIRE, THE HOLY WATER, THE SACRED INSTRUMENTS, THE HALF MOON ALTAR, AND THEIR BLESSINGS.  WE BELIEVE IN THE SACRAMENTAL USE AND THE HEALING POWER OF THE PLANT NATIONS.  WE BELIEVE THAT OUR PRAYERS ARE HEARD AND ATTENDED TO. WE BELIEVE THAT WE WILL BE JUDGED, HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR OUR ACTIONS IN THE AFTERLIFE, AND IN THE FORGIVENESS OF SINS.

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CALENDAR

 WE BELIEVE IN THE NATURAL RHYTHMS OF DAY AND NIGHT, THE FLOW OF THE SEASONS, THE MOVEMENT OF THE STARS, AND THE EXULTATION OF THESE OCCASIONS THROUGH ANY INDIGENOUS TRADITION OF THE EARTH.  WE CELEBRATE IN SACRALIZING THE ACT OF SONG, DANCE, RITUAL DRAMA, AND CEREMONIAL EXPRESSION.  WE BELIEVE THAT THE TIMES SHOULD BE KEPT, HONORED, RECKONED, AND OBSERVED.  WE BELIEVE IN THE SACRED HOOP AND THE CONTINUITY OF LIFE.

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TIOSPAYE/SPIRITUAL FAMILY

 WE BELIEVE IN FAMILY, EXTENDED FAMILY, ADOPTED FAMILY, AND OUR SPIRITUAL FAMILY. WE BELIEVE IN HOLDING REGULAR MEETINGS TO GOVERN, REWARD, AND DISCIPLINE OUR GROUP IN A HUMANE ABORIGINAL MANNER. WE RESPECT, HONOR AND ARE OBLIGATED TO CARE FOR OUR ELDERS AS WELL AS OUR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN NEED. WE HONOR THE DECEASED THROUGH FUNERARY RITES BY MAKING OFFERINGS, PRAYERS AND CARING FOR SOULS.

PETA WAKANPETA WAKAN

CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS

Fuego Sagrdo de Itzachilatlan of Colorado Corp. Native American Church (Sacred Fire of Itzachilatlan of Colorado Corp. Native American Church) CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS

Article I

Fuego Sagrdo de Itzachilatlan of Colorado Native American Church (hereby referred to as F.S.I.C.N.A.C.)

VISION STATEMENT: To be a community which authentically promotes and sustains: traditional Indigenous American rituals and ceremonies; awareness of and practical knowledge of good land and water stewardship; harmonious living with all beings and nature through a self-sustainable community. Our vision is to sustain, administer, protect, facilitate, spread, educate, exercise and express to and for all peoples the indigenous and aboriginal religious ceremonies, ways of spiritual expression, and ways of living in harmony with the earth, each other, and God, Wakan Tanka.

Article II

MISSION STATEMENT: Our mission is to provide authentic traditional indigenous ceremonies and rituals. Our community will be organized for the expression of indigenous spirituality and to provide religious, spiritual and educational services for all peoples willing to live in a sacred way.

PURPOSE STATEMENT: We preserve indigenous ceremony and ritual, because it is an endangered spiritual practice. We want to help humankind by promoting and ensuring the sanctity of these traditions because we believe they are important for ourselves, future generations, and for the spirit; for the health of humanity and our planet. We promote activities that nourish, stimulate, and further develop human creativity through spiritual expression, cultural identity, cultural art, and historical consciousness, as well as to promote unification of all cultural religious and spiritual workers. We help by teaching prayer technologies and offering workshops, classes, retreats and outreach programs. We are a living example of a harmonious, self-sustaining community and fellowship.

Article III

STATEMENT OF FAITH:

Mitakuye Oyasin/All Our Relations

We believe that we are all related. We are all sons and daughters of God, regardless of race, creed, color, and sexual orientation. We are all related to each other as humans. We are all related to the animals, the two legged, four legged, winged, and all Creation. We are all in turn related to the earth, sky, and all that there is and that we come from the stars. As intelligent beings, we are obligated to act responsibly as stewards of all Creation.

Wakan Tanka/God

We believe in the one God, the Great Mystery, Wakan Tanka. As everything He is four divisible by four and again divisible into the sixteen great powers of the universe: Chief God, Great Spirit, Creator, Executive, Stone, Earth, Sky, Sun, Thunder Beings, Beautiful One, Wind, Moon, Buffalo, Bear, Four Winds, and Whirlwind. The sixteen each divisible by four infinitely into all there is, known, unknown and unknowable.

Chanunpa/Sacred Pipe

We believe in our prayers, in the power of the sacred pipe, and the White Buffalo Calf Maiden who brought the pipe to the earth for all it’s people. We believe in Her teachings, Her blessing power and the promise of Her return.

Inipi Wakan/Sweat Lodge

We believe in the purifying and cleansing power of the sweat lodge ceremony, the sacrifice made by the Stone Nation, the Tunkasila (spirits), and by all the participants. We believe in praying within this mother’s womb for sobriety, clarity, guidance, and health. Hanbleceya/Vision Quest We believe that the everlasting word of God is spoken from every part of Divine Creation, that through nature and the sacrifice of the Vision Quest Rite the Great Mystery speaks to us all directly without exceptions, intermediaries, or interpreters.

Yuwipi – Lowanpi/Night Sing

We believe in the night sing, the power of Inyan/Stone, the miraculous healing power of the ancestors and the sacred songs. We believe in the Wiwila/Little People, animal spirits, and the various other Tunkasila/Spirits. We believe in the emptiness of the Medicine Man/Woman as a hollow bone for the spirits’ work.

Wiyang Wacipi/Sun Dance

We believe in the annual Sundance, the pipe, the sacrifice of the sacred cottonwood tree, the power of the sun, and the eternal flame. We believe that the sacrifices of the dancers, singers, and supporters benefits and purifies all the people.

All Night Prayer Vigils/Tipi Meetings

We believe in the sacred fire, the holy water, the sacred instruments, the half moon altar, and their blessings. We believe in the sacramental use and the healing power of the plant nations. We believe that our prayers are heard and attended to. We believe that we will be judged, held accountable for our actions in the afterlife, and in the forgiveness of sins.

Calendar

We believe in the natural rhythms of day and night, the flow of the seasons, the movement of the stars, and the exultation of these occasions through any indigenous tradition of the earth. We celebrate in sacralizing the act of song, dance, ritual drama, and ceremonial expression. We believe that the times should be kept, honored, reckoned, and observed. We believe in the sacred hoop and the continuity of life.

Tiospaye/Spiritual Family

We believe in family, extended family, adopted family, and our spiritual family. We believe in holding regular meetings to govern, reward, and discipline our group in a humane aboriginal manner. We respect, honor and are obligated to care for our elders as well as our men, women and children in need. We honor the deceased through funerary rites by making offerings, prayers and caring for souls.

Article IV

COMMUNITY RESIDENT COVENANT: As tiospaye community participants of F.S.I.C.N.A.C. we are expected to:

1. Attend regular council meetings.

2. Participate in prescribed ceremonies and be willing to grow spiritually.

3. Do our share of work.

4. Refrain from alcohol, recreational drugs, pornography, foul language, use of firearms, television, or radio on the premises.

5. Refrain from excessive talking, visitation or inappropriate behavior.

6. Refrain from inviting others to live on the premises without council approval.

7. Be an active or honorary member in good standing.

Article V

GROUP COVENANT: As a member of F.S.I.C.N.A.C. I commit myself to The Great Mystery and to the other members to:

1. Protect the unity of my church by: o acting in love toward other members o refusing to gossip o respecting the statement of faith

2. Share in the responsibility of my church by:

  • praying
  • being involved
  • doing my share of work

3. Support the integrity of my church by:

  • attending faithfully
  • walking the Red Road
  • following the Vision Statement and Mission Statement

4. Reconciliation and Restoration

  • Be willing to change and grow spiritually
  • Bring any trouble before the Council Meeting
  • Be willing to receive counseling and correction

Article VI

MEMBERSHIP: There are four types of membership:Honorary, Beneficiary, Active, and General. Each level of membership has its own qualifications and privileges. Dismissal from any level of membership and restoration of membership or reconciliation are at the discretion of the Directive Council. Refer to Articles of Incorporation Article 7

Naming of Directive Council.

A. Honorary

1. Qualifications

  • -Dedicated life to F.S.I.C.N.A.C.
  • -Regular participation in ceremonies
  • -Access and use of facilities
  • -Actively help with positive growth of F.S.I.C.N.A.C.
  • -Demonstrate leadership
  • -Regular spiritual practice
  • -Agree with Statement of Faith
  • -18 years or older

2. Privileges

  • -Live on the land full or part time
  • -Voice on the council
  • -Taking care of others
  • -Share community food, supplies, and work
  • -Serve on committees and boards
  • -Contribute to and receive quarterly newsletter
  • -Notification of smaller, private ceremonies
  • -Protection to attend ceremonies and privilege to sponsor private ceremonies
  • -Have access to our international network

B. Beneficiary

1. Qualifications

  • -$1,000 or more yearly donation
  • -18 years or older

2. Privileges

  • -Short term stays on land
  • -Access and use of facilities
  • -Voice on council
  • -Quarterly newsletter
  • -Protection to attend ceremonies and privilege to sponsor private ceremonies
  • -Have access to our international network

C. Active

1. Qualifications

  • -$200 recommended donation a year
  • -Be on committees
  • -Screening and interview process
  • -Agree with Statement of Faith
  • -Regular participation at ceremonies
  • -Regular spiritual practice
  • -Committed to and actively help the spiritual growth of others
  • -18 years or older

2. Privileges

  • -Live on the land full or part time with a 3 month trial period
  • -Access and use of facilities
  • -Voice on the council
  • -Taking care of others
  • -Share community food, supplies and work
  • -Serve on committees and boards
  • -Contribute to and receive quarterly newsletter
  • -Notification of smaller, private ceremonies
  • -Protection to attend ceremonies and privilege to sponsor private ceremonies
  • -Have access to our international network

D. General

1. Qualifications

  • -$100 recommended donation yearly
  • -Attend a ceremony
  • -Donate at ceremonies
  • -Agree with Statement of Faith
  • -18 years or older

2. Privileges

  • -Short term stays on land
  • -Access and use of facilities
  • -Voice on the council
  • -Serve on committee
  • -Receive quarterly newsletter
  • -Protection to attend ceremonies and privilege to sponsor private ceremonies
  • -Have access to our international network Article VII F.S.I.C.N.A.C.

COUNCIL MEETINGS

A. Community: All participants have a voice although all authority in the community is vested in the deciding population known as the Governing Council. The following items of business shall be brought to the Council Meetings.

Selection of members and community residents

Budget

Projects

Community jobs

Discipline

Schedule

Use of property

B. Fiscal Year: Fiscal year of F.S.I.C.N.A.C. shall be January 1 through December 31.

C. Council Meetings: There shall be regular weekly meetings of the community for ceremonies, prayer, teaching, learning, support, inspiration and conducting business. At least annually the Governing Council and all members shall be called together to set major goals.

D. Emergency Meetings: Emergency meetings may be called at any time by any Governing Council.

E. Quorum: A quorum of the Governing Council shall be 80%. F. Voting: Voting on the selection of Members/Officers, changing the Articles of Incorporation / Bylaws or buying or selling property will be limited to the Directive Council.

Article VIII

SPIRITUAL ADVISERS: F.S.I.C.N.A.C. will also have a directive position known as Spiritual Adviser. The Spiritual Advisor’s duties will be to oversee rituals and ceremonies with the upmost highest reverence, integrity, and diligence in accordance with tradition of how they received the altars and authority to conduct said ceremonies. Spiritual Advisors will not be part of (unless they are Officers, members, and or Directive Council) administrative duties, governing, and or day-to-day maintenance of the Corporation. Spiritual advisors are those who fulfill all requirements and prerequisites as laid out below, and are also appointed by the Directive Council and have a good standing with all officers and members as understood below. Spiritual advisors can be members, Officers, and or Directive Council, but being any of the latter does not necessarily mean being a spiritual advisor. Being a Spiritual Advisor is a privilege and requires strenuous prerequisites and community approval. There will be categories of Spiritual Advisors according to the different requirements and ceremonies listed, also there will be levels within each category which will define how much authority is granted to perform the functions of the spiritual advisor and preside over or within ceremonies.

1. General Functions, responsibilities, and privileges of Spiritual Advisors. a) Spiritual leadership and guidance

b) Prophesying

c) Healing and protecting

d) Conducting and facilitating ceremonies

e) Working positions and performing duties within ceremony

f) Being an example of spiritual life and living in a sacred manner

g) Representing F.S.I. C. N.A.C.

2. General Qualifications and Requirements of Being a spiritual advisor

a) Walking the Red Road in a sacred way: as the Spirits, the white buffalo calf woman, the ceremonies, and the sacred teachings have defined it for us, passed through the ages by medicine people, chiefs, wise ones, and our ancestors.

b) By living and exemplifying the sacred virtues; including the Lakota 4 sacred virtues humility, compassion, humor, and courage, and the 7 arrows of the sacred fire, Faith, Hope, Charity, justice, temperance, prudence, and Fortitude.

c) Carrying a Canupa; which is received in a good way, by vision quest, marriage, Hunka, inheritance, and or by receiving as a gift from an elder or medicine person.

d) Doing vision quest annually; praying and fasting alone in the woods for the benefit of oneself and more importantly for the benefit of all living beings. To be in connection with tunkasila and the spirits.

e) To be in good standing with the community, members, officers, and directive council. To help the community and to be of service to it. To understand the functioning of ceremonial life and to not over step boundaries, comforts, and roles of leadership within the community and positions of spiritual advisors.

f) Being appointed by the directive council and most importantly being ordained and or officially recognized by the Chief Spiritual advisor and the other spiritual advisors, to have formally offered tobacco or opagi the Chief Spiritual Advisor for those specific purposes.

3. For a detailed description on categories and Types of Spiritual Advisors see attached appendix to the bylaws.

Article IX

CHURCH OFFICERS: Any two or more offices may be held by the same Person, except the offices of President and Secretary.

A. President: The president is a servant whose privilege it is to serve F.S.I.C.N.A.C. as a leader. The President shall:

  • -Compile and present the agenda for each meeting
  • -Preside over Council Meeting and other meetings
  • -Keep the Spiritual Advisors informed
  • -Be responsible for public relations

1. Term: The President is not limited by a term of office.

2. Nomination: Nominations for President shall be given to the Directive Council at a Council Meeting at least a week before the Annual Council Meeting. Any candidate for President should be an Active/Honorary Member in good standing.

3. Selection: The President will be selected at the annual meeting by the Directive Council or whenever necessary. B.Vice President: The Vice President is a servant whose privilege it is to serve F.S.I.C.N.A.C. by handling the Church’s Organization.

The Vice President shall:

  • -Manage all officers and/or committees
  • -Fill in for the President in his/her absence
  • -Assign tasks to officers and/or committees
  • -Deposit all church monies and oversee Treasurer activities
  • -Notify Treasurer of amount and designation of each deposit
  • -Oversee the management of property and/or residents of property

1. Term: The Vice President is not limited by a term of office

2. Nomination: Nomination for Vice President shall be given to the Directive Council at a Council Meeting at least a week before the Annual Council Meeting. Any candidate for Vice President should be an Active/Honorary member in good standing.

C. Treasurer: The Treasurer is a servant whose privilege is to serve F.S.I.C.N.A.C. by caring for the finances of the church in maintaining the church books.

The Treasurer shall:

  • -Receive all church monies, Count monies, Record monies
  • -Pay the bills
  • -Keep and present an accurate record of transactions
  • -Present an annual report
  • -Prepare and file reports for Federal, State and County taxes
  • -Maintain given records According to state law, the treasurer shall not receive or deposit any church monies.

1. Term: The Treasurer is not limited by a term of office.

2. Nomination: Nominations for Treasurer shall be given to the Directive Council at a Council meeting at least a week before the Annual Council Meeting. Any candidate for Treasurer should be an Honorary/Active Member in good standing.

3. Selection: The Treasurer will be selected at the Annual Council Meeting by the Directive Council or whenever necessary.

D. Secretary: Secretary is a servant whose privilege is to serve F.S.I.C.N.A.C by maintaining the church records.

The Secretary shall:

  • -Keep minutes of all council meetings
  • -Keep records of membership
  • -Maintain historical records

1. Term the Secretary is not limited by a term of office

2. Nomination: Nomination for Secretary shall be given to the Directive Council at a Council Meeting at least a week before the Annual CouncilMeeting. Any candidate for Secretary should be an Honorary/Active Member in good standing.

Article X

STANDING COMMITTEES: A member of a standing committee must be a member in good standing of F.S.I.C.N.A.C. The chairperson shall be chosen by each standing committee from among its members. Committees may bring decisions to the Governing Council for affirmation or a vote as they deem it necessary. The Standing Committees of F.S.I.C.N.A.C. may include, but not be limited to:

  1.  Ceremonial
  2.  Communal
  3.  Kitchen
  4.  Security
  5.  Shop
  6.  Educational/childcare
  7.  Woman’s
  8.  Men’s
  9.  Song/Language
  10.  Retreat
  11.  Fundraising

Article XI

INDEMNIFICATION: The Directive Council shall have and may exercise the power to indemnify any director, officer, employee, fiduciary, or agent or former director, officer, fiduciary, or agent of the Corporations, and the Personal Representatives of all such persons, against expenses actually and necessarily incurred in connection with the defense of any suit, action or proceeding, in which such person is made a party by reason of being or having been such director, officer, employee, fiduciary, or agent. Expenses actually and necessarily incurred shall be deemed to include the costs to such person of reasonable settlement made with the consent of the Corporation. Such indemnification, if approved by the Directive Council, shall not be deemed exclusive of any other rights to which such person may be entitled, under this Constitution, by agreement, by vote of the Directive Council, or otherwise. The extent of the Corporation’s power to indemnify the above-enumerated persons shall be as defined by Section 7-22-101.5 of the Colorado Revised Statues, which incorporates by reference Sections 7-109-101 to 1-109-110 and Section 7-108-402.2 of the Colorado revised Statues. Notwithstanding the above, nothing contained in this article, or elsewhere in this Constitution, or in the Articles of Incorporation, shall be construed to require the Directive Council to indemnify any director, officer, employee, fiduciary, or agent nor to grant to any such person a right of indemnification.

Article XII

ACQUISITION AND DISPOSITION OF PROPERTY

1. Real Estate. Any council meeting at which decisions are to be made to buy, sell or encumber the real estate or approve new construction on the property will be announced, and the nature of the business publicized at all regular meetings for two weeks prior to the meeting and the resident members shall be notified of said meeting by e-mail not less than ten (10) days before the meeting. Such decisions regarding the real property shall be approved by a vote of the Directive Council.

2. Organic Division. Should any unfortunate conditions arise which would bring division in the membership of this church, the property shall belong to the members who abide by this constitution. Should there be a question as to who is abiding by this constitution, a board of arbitration shall be appointed by the Directive Council, the association or convention with which the Church is affiliated at the time of division to determine which party of the division is following the constitution.

3. Dissolution and Disposition of Property. In the event of dissolution of the Corporation, the property and assets thereof remaining after providing for all obligations shall be distributed pursuant to the Colorado Revised Nonprofit Corporation Act at Article 134.11

Article XIII

AMENDMENTS: These articles or rules or order may be altered, amended or stricken out at any regular council meeting provided that copies of the amendment have been presented in writing to the membership and duly publicized at Church meetings for a period of at least two weeks prior to such meeting, and provided further that such change shall not conflict with the articles of incorporation of the Church.

Article XIV

ORGANIZATIONS: No organization shall be formed or considered a part of church activities until it is approved by the Directive Council/Governing Council. Approved organizations must confer with a designated honorary member or officer from time to time regarding their objectives and plans. No organization shall incur financial obligations for the Church to pay, outside budgeted funds or special organization treasury, without the approval of the Directive Council/Governing Council. Each organization shall prepare a program and financial report of the annual meeting of the Church.

Article XV

ORDAINING, LICENSING, AND COMMISSIONING

1. Ordination. The church shall have the authority to ordain a member who has proven himself/herself to the Directive Council/Spiritual Advisors and having formally offered tobacco. The ordination process shall follow the recognized procedures of the F.S.I.C.N.A.C.

2. Licensing. The Directive Council shall have the authority to license a member of the Church who has demonstrated prolonged, consistent, and active ceremonial participation and/or having formally offered tobacco to carry out those spiritual functions and duties as approved by the Directive Council/Chief Spiritual Advisor. The license granted by the Directive Council/Spiritual Advisors may be ongoing and may be for a specified term. The Chief Spiritual Advisor may revoke this license at any time with or without cause.

3. Commissioning. F.S.I.C.N.A.C. will not commission anyone for any work to be done for the Church.

Article XVI

WAVIER OF NOTICE CONTRACTS: F.S.I.C.N.A.C. will not authorize any officer or officers, official or officials, agent or agents of the Church to enter into any contract for the Church. Whenever any notice is required to be given under the provisions of the State of Colorado Nonprofit Corporation Act or under the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation or the Constitution of the Corporation, a wavier thereof in writing signed by the person or persons entitled to such notice, whether before or after the time stated therein, shall be deemed equivalent to the giving of such notice.

May Building Project

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May Building Project

FOR MANY YEARS, WE AS A COMMUNITY HAVE PLANNED TO CREATE A PLACE FOR CEREMONY. MUCH PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE AND OUR POTENTIAL IS SO TREMENDOUS. OUR PLAN TO CREATE A FOUNDATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUAL CULTURE AND TRADITIONS HAS EXPERIENCED A LOT OF RESISTANCE THROUGH THE YEARS. WE HAVE BEEN PEACEFULLY PERFORMING CEREMONIES IN THIS AREA FOR TWENTY YEARS AND HAVE FINALLY REACHED THE POINT OF HAVING A HOME FOR OUR WAY OF LIFE. IT IS IRONIC, THAT IN AN AREA KNOWN FOR THE PRESERVATION OF THE WORLD’S SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS, THE INDIGENOUS WAYS OF THIS LAND HAVE BEEN CONSISTENTLY REPRESSED. THE SAN LUIS VALLEY HAS FOR SOME 12 THOUSAND YEARS, BEEN A SAFE HAVEN OF THE VERY CEREMONIES WE AIM TO PROTECT. FROM THE SPANISH OPPRESSION TO THE EARLY SETTLERS AND MINERS A HUNDRED YEARS AGO AND NOW INTO THE PRESENT DAY, THE CULTURE OF THIS LAND HAS BEEN BRUSHED ASIDE TO MAKE ROOM FOR FOREIGN, INVASIVE CULTURES. ONE THING SHOULD REMAIN TRUE AND THAT IS THAT EVERY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD SHOULD HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE FREE EXPRESSION OF THEIR RELIGION. AS A FEDERAL RIGHT.

 

SUNP0048

 

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 WE ARE MEETING WITH THE POA ON THE 20TH ABOUT OUR DENIED BUILDING EXTENSION AND ARE SUBMITTING OUR CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT WITH THE COUNTY THIS MONTH AND ARE HOPING FOR POSITIVE RESULTS.

03007292013_1243

OVER THE YEARS WE HAVE MET WITH A LOT OF RESISTANCE AND WE WILL CONTINUE TO PERSEVERE WITH JOY AND FAITH. ONE OF OUR GREATEST CHALLENGES WAS WHEN OUR BUILDING CONTRACTOR, JIM HAULMAN, ABANDONED OUR PROJECT IN NOVEMBER 2013, WHICH COST US SOMEWHERE AROUND $40,000. NO MATTER WHAT, WE WILL ALWAYS PROTECT OUR FREEDOM OF RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION. WE WILL CONTINUE TO STAND UP FOR OUR RIGHTS AND WE ARE COMMITTED TO PRESERVING AND SPREADING INDIGENOUS AMERICAN SPIRITUAL CULTURE.

teepee we used for the peyote ceremony

WHAT WE ARE PROPOSING TO DO WOULD BE A GREAT BOON TO SAGUACHE COUNTY AS WELL AS BENEFITING LOCAL REALTY AND LAND VALUE. OUR COMMUNITY ATTRACTS PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. LOCAL BUSINESS’S AND PLACES OF LODGING BENEFIT DRAMATICALLY. PROPERTIES ADJACENT TO OURS AND IN THE AREA WILL ALSO HAVE A BRIGHT FUTURE, NOT TO MENTION ALL THE OTHER PROPERTIES THAT ARE CURRENTLY OWNED BY OUR CONGREGATION. THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS OF OUR AREA, THE UTE TRIBE, WILL BENEFIT SIGNIFICANTLY FROM OUR LOCAL POWWOW. MANY LOCAL NATIVE AMERICAN GROUPS WILL BENEFIT FROM OUR GOURD DANCE AS WELL AS FROM ALL OUR OTHER CEREMONIAL EVENTS. HOPEFULLY PREJUDICE AND RACIAL ANIMOSITIES WILL COME TO AN END AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND IDENTITY WILL BE CELEBRATED.

 

Jamestown, America's first Property Owners Association.

Jamestown, America’s first Property Owners Association.

“In a time when the Ocean is being poisoned, radiation is contaminating our earth, food is being genetically altered to be a pesticide and war has become technologically streamlined. People and other animals are dying of cancer for no apparent reason. We live in a place where there is little hope and yet people will try to stamp out our little church, just because they can. like the people before them, destroying the indigenous to make room for the domestic. In times like these you would think people would feel shame for smashing the dreams and hopes of others. You would think people would exercise kindness and act with dignity.

That is our job, to help the aggrieved, to act with kindness and patience. It is for us to pray for the those who need help and forgive those who are filled with spite. While winds of doom blow stronger, we should hold to the dream of a better world.  Despite the wrongs and injustice of others, we can learn to forgive and allow our selves to be shaped by nature, rather than shaping nature. We could stand in this storm and shake our fists in anger at the storm, or we can occupy our time with love, truth and dignity. Never forget the injustices, but also never let them control your heart. As spiritual citizens it is also our job and obligation to uphold Religious freedom for ourselves as well as for the future generations.”

Aho Mitakuye Oyasin.

Click here to read about the POA and the FHA

Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use

Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use

Click here to read: The Department of Justice Newsletter: Religious Freedom in Focus Newsletters

TO READ THE FAIR HOUSING ACT CLICK HERE!

 

 

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South East Corner of building

South East Corner of building

Well Truck

Well Truck

Well Truck

A view from the arbor

A view from the arbor

Building site 2013

Building site 2013

Planing the well

Building site

Building site

Eastern View from Building site

View from Building site

teepee we used for the peyote ceremony

POA/HOA and the Fair Housing Act

stock-illustration-13883777-american-eagle-early-woodblock-illustrations

 

Click this link to file your complaint:  www.hud.gov

Federal Law Prohibits Housing Discrimination

The Fair Housing Act prohibits anyone from refusing to sell or rent housing to a possible buyer or tenant based on that person’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. This act also prohibits housing discrimination based on family status. A seller or landlord cannot refuse to sell or rent to a buyer or renter who is a parent or guardian of a person under the age of 18.

An HOA’s regulations often give the board of directors the right to approve new buyers or renters. Because an HOA must follow the rules of the Fair Housing Act, an HOA board cannot reject a new resident based on the person’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or familial status.

The federal Fair Housing Act and Fair Housing Amendments Act (42 U.S. Code §§ 3601-3619, 3631) prohibit landlords from choosing tenants on the basis of a group characteristic such as race, religion, ethnic background, sex, familial status or disablity.

Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use
Sorry sir, this part of the forest is not zoned for religious use

“It shall be unlawful to discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of sale or rental of a dwelling, or the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because of race,color, religion , sex, familial status, or national origin 42 U.S.C. 3604(b)”

The FHA applies to:
♠ Direct providers of housing;
♠ Entities and associations that set terms and conditions for housing; and
♠ Entities and associations that provide services and facilities in connection with housing

Courts have held that the FHA Applies to Community
Associations — including POA’s HOA’s and Condo Associations.
♠ Community Associations set rules and covenants that apply to homeowners.
♠ Community Associations provide services or facilities in connection with housing.

♠ Thus, Community Associations are “housing providers” under the FHA.

Flag-banner-Patriotic-GraphicsFairy2

♥ Block v. Frischholz, 587 F.3d 771 (7thCir 2009)Plaintiff, an orthodox Jew, sued Condominium Association and Board president for religious discrimination because Board refused to allow
him to have a religious display on his exterior door.

♥ The FHA Applies to Community Associations cont.Housing Opportunities Project for Excellence, Inc. v.
Key Colony No. 4 Condominium Assoc., 510 F. Supp. 2d 1003 (S.D. Fla. 2007)Plaintiff sued HOA and HOA board members under FHA and Florida housing laws claiming that occupancy restrictions and rules for pool and clubhouse discriminated against families with children.

♥ The FHA Applies to Community Associations Savanna Club Worship Service, Inc. v. Savanna Club
Homeowners’ Association, 456 F. Supp. 2d 1223 (S.D. Fla. 2005)Owners of a religious club sued HOA and board members because the HOA prohibited religious services in common areas
Note: The Court dismissed the Plaintiff’s claims because the HOA applied its restrictions in a neutral manner. The Court recognized, however, that HOA’s are governed by the FHA since they control and regulate certain property rights, such as use of common areas and facilities.

Antique-Patriotic-Eagle-Image-GraphicsFairy

Community Associations:
Restrictive Covenants
♠ Courts across the country have allowed lawsuits to proceed based on discriminatory covenant enforcement.
♠ Racially-restrictive covenants were a major reason for the implementation of the FHA in 1968.
♠ Currently, race, religion, and national origin are major areas of enforcement and risk for
Community Associations.

Community Associations:
Restrictive Covenants cont.Tokh v. Water Tower Court Home Owner Association, 327 Fed. Appx. 630 (7
thCir. 2009).In Tokh, a member of an HOA sued his HOA and its Management Company for national origin and race discrimination after being fined for enlarging a patio in violation of the HOA’s covenants.

Jamestown, America's first Property Owners Association.

Jamestown, America’s first Property Owners Association.

Potential FHA violations
♠ HOA allows religious groups to use a community chapel facility but not non-religious groups
♠ Condominium Association waives fee for Boy Scouts of America to use community room for free but charges other groups
♠ Community pool establishes “adult swim” hours
♠ Community Association-controlled golf course restricts men from playing on Tuesday mornings

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Civil Violations
♦ Civil Penalties include fines of up to $10,000 for a violation of the FHA and up to $74,000 for multiple
violations
♦ Injunctive and equitable relief to stop and change practices and policies that violate the FHA
♦ Payment of Court costs and attorneys’ fees to the Government
♦ Individual penalties and liability for board members and other individuals!!

Criminal Penalties
♦ Violations of the FHA that involve threats, intimidation, or violence can also lead to criminal fines and imprisonment.

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How can a renter file a discrimination complaint?

A POA-HOA member who thinks that an HOA has broken a federal fair housing law should contact a local office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the agency that enforces the Fair Housing Act, or check the HUD website at www.hud.gov. (POA-HOA members must file the complaint within one year of the alleged discriminatory act.)

HUD will provide a complaint form (POA-HOA members can fill the form out online) and will investigate and decide whether there is reasonable cause to believe that the fair housing law has been broken. If the answer is yes, HUD will typically appoint a mediator to negotiate with the HOA and reach a settlement (called a “conciliation”). If a settlement is later broken, HUD will recommend that the Attorney General file a lawsuit.

If the discrimination is a violation of a state fair housing law, the tenant may file a complaint with the state agency in charge of enforcing the law. In California, for example, the Department of Fair Employment and Housing enforces the state’s two fair housing laws.

Also, instead of filing a complaint with HUD or a state agency, tenants may file lawsuits directly in federal or state court. If a state or federal court or housing agency finds that discrimination has taken place, a tenant may be awarded damages, including any higher rent paid as a result of being turned down, an order directing the landlord to offer the rental to the tenant, and compensation for humiliation or emotional distress.

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To read The Fair Housing Act Click here!