Understanding spirituality

You are made from the very substance of God. Nothing you do can separate you from the creator. As your birthright, All the answers rest within yourself. No matter what spiritual path you follow, you should always be suspicious of  exorbitant fees and prices for something that has no shape or form or substance.  If you are paying for an experience, be sure that the fee that you pay is only covering the expenses.

All too often people who are placed in positions of power are psychopaths, google that! Just because someone is Native American does not mean that they have the qualifications necessary to lead you on the spiritual path. Ultimately, this is something only you can do. You are solely responsible for your spiritual clarity. Connect within yourself. No one is able to do this for you!

If someone is assisting you on your spiritual path, be sure this is the only role that they play in your unfoldment.   If you are foolish enough to give someone exorbitant amounts of money for guidance then you are only deluding yourself.  Every fiber of your being connects to the source of all that is.  This is the divine mystery of Native American spirituality and all spiritual paths.

Most people on the spiritual path seem to be completely distracted from actually connecting to source. Many many years may go by  and the only thing you may achieve is a self dialogue about how spiritual you think you are. Telling yourself each day that you are such and such or so and so when it is just a lie.  It does not matter how sacred you think your feathers are, it is what you do with them that matters.  It is better to rely on what is within you, without culture and without your internal dialogue. The spirit is beyond all this, and yet it is right in front of you all along.

most spiritual or religious activities  are ways for you to sacrifice yourself for a greater good. They are not ways to get closer to God or to achieve spirituality, these things you already possess. A ceremony should be a celebration of the divinity we already have. Look at all the people who have  been sacrificing themselves for lifetimes and have little spiritual integrity to show for it. The number of rituals and rights you have undergone does not determine how spiritual you are. Make your spirituality count and make your sacrifices count by living a simple life, in humility, honesty and compassion.

There is a lot of ego in religion. To be spiritual you need to go no further  than looking within yourself and by enjoying the simple gifts that life has provided you.  You do not need to pray in order to be spiritual, prayer is a form of communication. If you need a friend to lead and guide you, understand that this person is no more spiritual than you are.  Such a person is only a tour guide, and can never be anything more than that. Remember your Divinity and your birthright as part of the creation.

We have lived on this earth for millions of years. Our connection is timeless, beyond cultural forms, race, gender and ideas of any kind.  Regardless of the spiritual path you have chosen, your connectedness is inevitable, it is your awareness of this that is significant.  Connect by yourself now rather than wait for someone to do it for you.  You may be waiting for a long time for nothing, only to realize it was there all along. It is impossible for someone to make you spiritual and it is impossible to buy a connection. All of this, our lives and everything else has been given to you freely. Only your perspective can make any difference in any of it at all.

 

 

 

Wiwila Oyate

All over the world, on every continent and in every culture one can hear stories of a tiny race of people who live underground. Through the illustrations of children’s books one can see that this belief survived the Inquisition and the domination of Christianity. The Little People may be small but their presence is strong among those who have seen and encountered them. Like the Tree Spirits (Fairies) and the Sasquatch (Bigfoot), many cultures share the lore of these mythical beings, even into present day.

Lore of the Little People, Elves, Leprechauns or Gnomes is so incredibly vast that it would take a lifetime to record all the known stories of them. Like the Tree Fairies and Bigfoot, the stories continue as people encounter them. One theme that remains constant in all cultures is how these mythical being are visiting us less and less as we recede away into the realm of logic. The more domestic we become, the more preposterous these old stories seem.

Wiwila is the Lakota word for Spring, a place where water flows from the earth. Wiwila Oyate is one of several names for the Little People, The Spring Nation. The Wiwila are said to have been created before humankind. Made to regulate the seasons, the movement of the planets, the waterways and springs, these people are some times seen by others, reminding us of the stories of old.

Whatever the culture, the stories of them usually include the granting of a wish, some sort of trickery or a combination of both. Always there seems to be an element of danger or harm that may befall one who harasses them. It is believed that when venturing into the wilderness one should take heed not to trespass into Wiwila territory or suffer the invisible arrows shot by little men. While the Wiwila is feared and avoided in most cases, there is a time and place where they are still called upon for help, Yuwipi.

Nowhere is the Wiwila more prevalent than in the Yuwipi and lowanpi Ceremonies. They can be seen, heard running about and are often felt and recognized by their tiny hands. Usually one would not speak of them, let alone write about them on the computer! Now we have reached a time where we must remind the human race about the servants of the earth and of the other beings who live in symbiosis with us here. It may seem unreasonable to modern culture that they exist, but the fact remains that they do.

The Wiwila, among other beings, are said to have inhabited the earth before humankind, at some point they are said to have called us, or wished us here with their intention, drawing us from the Pleiades. This is not just Lakota myth, many cultures believed this at one time. It is said that the creator gave us intelligence to appreciate his artwork, but it is also said that we were given intelligence in order to communicate with the divine beings. So that when the Wiwila needed help in regulating nature, they could call upon the humans for help.

As a race, we seem unable to hear them now but they are calling to us still, even through the chatter of our own minds. Around the industrial revolution there are literally thousands of stories of warnings from the Little people all over the world. It is so strange that these stories are so obscure and hard to find because it was not so long ago that the Industrial revolution began. In Germany, each town and province has stories of their warnings, that the they are leaving because of the construction of some machine or factory in the area. There are literally thousands of such stories across Europe.

Could it be that the modern concept of aliens is none other than the original inhabitants of this world? In Native American understanding, the Star Nations (wicahpi Oyate), are the the gods and goddesses who live in the heavens, not alien races. Obviously there seems to be life everywhere, but these alien characters seem more like elves than astronauts! Whatever the case may be, their message is clear to those that listen carefully.

Palmistry Reading

Aside


Type of Palm Reading
Specific Questions:



To Get an online Palm reading with Christopher, just take pictures of your hands and send to (719) 588-8181. You can also send them to advanceddivination@gmail.com, through Facebook or by mail. It is also possible to send a scan of the hands by placing your palms over a scanner or printer.

Take Pictures of the front, back and sides of both hands. Different lighting  conditions and different angles of light help a lot too. Send by phone, mail, or Email them to advanceddivination@gmail.com. Be sure and give me your name and phone number and decide on a good time for me to call. This reading will be very detailed, so it would be best if it was recorded.

Any extra photographs can be very helpful in answering complex questions, for instance, if you wanted to know where you were born or something of that nature, it would helpful to have pictures of the bottoms of your feet, your face, profile and any curious moles, birthmarks and/or scars you might have.

A basic reading is 30 minutes long. It can be done in classic palmistry fashion or we can spend that time just looking at the present in order to resolve an issue or answer some questions.

A full palm reading is one hour long. It can entail both, the classic palm reading, as well as looking into specific issues.

A complete palm reading is every thing I can find out about you from your hands (or from any pictures that you send me). This can be over the phone or in written text form (as an essay), or both. This will also include an Astro-palmistry natal chart of the hand showing planetary signs.

A composite of any of the above readings can be customized as you like. If you are a student of palmistry, or if you are interested in understanding how I know what I know, I can draw out any specific detail in your hands along with explanations.

Also, you can Click this link to go to my Facebook page. Text me your information for free questions and readings. Any Information you share will remain private and can be used for future readings!

                                     back of left hand Right palm Baby's palm Left side Right and Left great palm Left side of hand

Readings usually occur over the phone, although, it is possible for an audio recorded reading to be sent to your email. For the complete reading, you will receive a text format sent to your email.

Legal Disclaimer: By agreeing to use the services of Advanced Palmistry you agree that you have read and understand that all information is subject to the service recipient’s interpretation.Advanced Palmistry will not be held accountable for any interpretations  or decisions made by recipients based on information provided during readings.These readings are for entertainment purposes only. All information and/or advice given to you by Advanced Palmistry should not take the place of any medical, legal or financial advice given to you by any qualified professional.  All sessions by Advanced Palmistry are not a substitute for medical, legal or financial advice.You must be 18 years of age to use this service, or have written consent from a parent or legal guardian. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Moontime Details

The Singing Stone fully recognizes the extreme energy that women carry during Moontime. Divine Feminine physical manifestations of our Creator/Creatrix, our power is so great that we are capable of bringing forth new life. Because Moontime is such a powerful pull, we follow these traditional Lakota Ceremonies as they were passed to us and we do not allow mooning women to attend. The reason for this is because moontime energy would completely take over the intentions of the Medicine Man/Woman and people who put so much effort into creating a Ceremony with a specific purpose. As we have been guided by our teachers, women on their moontime may be present for All Night Peyote Meetings but would need to prepare 13 prayer ties around her waist with the intention to not interfere with the main intention. Ceremonies that consist of only women such as a sweat lodge and non traditional rituals would not include drums, feathers, sacred pipes, or any other sacred objects used in Indigenous Ceremonies for men and women.

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

Hanbleceya List

The Singing Stone

Hanbleceya List

www.thesingingstone.com conjurespirits@gmail.com

Click here to download: Hanbleceya List

We welcome those interested in going out for vision quest to present tobacco or a loaded pipe to the Medicine Man. Please have a clear intention in regards to the number of days that you would like to be sequestered. Anyone interested in going on the hill must have supported at least one time. We also ask that you assist with wood preparations beforehand. You must supply prepared food, snacks, and/or any other meal items or monetary donations to feed supporters. It is helpful if you have two people to be your “helpers”. If this is not possible then a supporter(s) will be designated to assist you when you go out as well as when you return. Please arrive one or two days prior to the date to be planted. Below is a list of materials needed for Vision Quest.

Large amount of loose tobacco

  1. Fabric for 405 prayer ties (1” apart) in this order around a ball of sage on a continuous string:

    - 5 in colors of your choice of blue, green, and/or purple (small amount of fabric)

    - 100 white (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 yellow (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 red (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

    - 100 black (1/3 yard for 2” squares)

  2. Fabric (¼ yard each)

    - Black, red, yellow, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, & purple for flags

         – red felt for waluta

         – red for wrapping items

  1. One new star quilt, Pendleton blanket, or animal hide to give away 

  2. One personal blanket

  3. One new knife (cheap/expensive/your choice)

  4. One Pipe (corn husk tobacco may be provided)

  5. One new metal bucket to give away

  6. One new metal dipper to give away

  7. Medicine Wheel

  8. Shell Button

  9. Sweetgrass braid

  10. Sage (one armload may be collected or purchased)

  11. One special feather

  12. Six Chokecherry sticks collected in woods cut to one yard and pointed prior to Hanbleceya

  13. Attire: – Men wear shorts and a good pair of shoes – Women wear a cotton dress, shawl, if desired, and a good pair of shoes

  14. Feast for supporters for after Hanbleceya

  15. Personal food/drink for after

  16. Optional Giveaway for supporters

The Singing Stone has some items available for purchase such as metal dippers, higher quality metal buckets, sweet grass braids, medicine wheels, and shells. Bucket and dipper may be purchased at Big R arriving north in Conifer 303-816-7124. From south in Alamosa 719-587-0435. Orr’s Trading Company in Englewood, Colorado (near Denver) has shells buttons, quill work medicine wheels, and other items that you may need. They are at 303-722-6466.

To do the vision quest one would need to make the tobacco prayer ties. The 405 prayer ties are offerings for the 405 spirits of the Earth (Wasicun pi). The spirits that come will inspect each one ( they may not all come ).  The ties are also a protective device, in that only the 405 spirit may enter. Usually we use just basic cotton fabric. Normally the 405 ties are red but colors can vary depending on the situation. Be sure and contact us about this important detail. The fabric is cut into 2 inch squares.

The string to use may be yarn, kite string, or sinew (waxed nylon). A tiny pinch of tobacco is placed into a cloth square, using two slip knots, the bundle is tied without cutting the string. Keep the prayer ties an inch apart. You should only be praying while you do this, nothing else. It is nice to smudge the prayer ties each time you sit down to work on them. The ties should be rolled onto a small wad of sage as you go along, sort of like rolling a ball of yarn. They can be made in stages or all at once. Be sure the string will be long enough, pieces of string cannot be tied together. So make sure you wind up with one continuous line of 405 prayer ties 1 inch apart.

You will also need to make prayer flags, also known as robes. You will need 1/4 yard of red, yellow, black, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, and lavender. These should be new basic cotton. Also you will need 1/4 yard of red felt of any kind. A small hand full of tobacco is placed into the corner of the fabric and tied into a bundle with string. Each flag will be separate but make sure you leave about 7 inches of string  on either side of the bundle to tie these to sticks later.

Just before vision quest we will take a short hike to gather fresh sage and five forked sticks either chokecherry or juniper. The prayer flags will be tied to these just before the sweat lodge. The sage will be laid out upon the ground within the Hocoka.

For the red felt prayer flag (waluta) you will also need a shell button, a medicine wheel disc decorated with porcupine quills, and a special feather. These will be tied to the bundle in that order. Please contact us if you cannot find some of these supplies.

A metal bucket with a dipper and a plain knife will be needed. An extra quarter yard of red basic cotton fabric will be used to wrap all of these things with sage. All of the items used in the vision quest must be new and unused. You will need a new star quilt or a Pendleton blanket or a buffalo hide. Everything that has been mentioned so far will be given away afterwards, except the sage, which can be used throughout the year as smudge incense. An extra blanket should be brought. This can be a used blanket of any kind that you will not give away.

The most important item for the vision quest is the sacred canupa or sacred pipe. Those people who carry a canupa will use their own. We will provide a pipe (on loan) to those who do not have one. Like the bucket, dipper, and knife, their handles will be wrapped in sage with the extra red fabric.

During the Vision Quest, if you need to use the “bathroom” you will place your sweetgrass braid over the prayer tie string. You will step over the braid outside of the hocoka use the “bathroom” and step back over the sweetgrass braid into the hocoka and remove the sweetgrass braid from the prayer tie string. To avoid all this one should fast from solid foods one or two days before going up on the hill.

In the event of the menses unexpectedly occurring while questing, a woman then is led away from the sequestered area and will be taken to the Moon Lodge. The ceremony ends for her then and can resume at a later date.( We will know if  the Moontime begins ).

Appropriate attire for this event for men is a pair of shorts or underwear. Ladies wear a simple cotton dress. We have sweat dresses and all of the necessary ceremonial equipment available.

Anyone participating in the vision quest would be responsible for providing a feast for all of the supporters. In some cases one would give gifts to all of the supporters as well. Contact us for more details in regards to this. Some of the foods for this are specific and would have to be prepared during the Ceremony. A few groceries to feed some of the supporters are necessary as well (they will participate in a light fast).

Moontime Details

Moontime (Menses) is a special time for a woman to enjoy her own Ceremony in solitude or with other mooning women. We encourage our young sisters who have reached womanhood and mothers who are still in this phase to rejuvenate and relax while others attend to children and other responsibilities. We envision a space for Goddesses to retreat together during this sacred time. For now, we have a red tipi which women are welcome to retreat to for however long or short needed. To read more about this energy, feel free to read Reclaiming our Moon Lodge. Contact Andrea Long at 719-937-1331 if you may be starting your sacred Moontime during one of our Ceremonies and she is happy to be of service and help hold space.

 

Make a tax deductible donation!

Reclaiming our Moon Lodge

Buffalo Card done




Tax deductible ♥

As our Grandmothers have done since before recorded history, we the women enter into our own Ceremony each month. Flesh and blood, these physical manifestations of Spirit have the incredible capability to give life. Not to be taken for granted, moon time (menstruation) is a special time when our power is so great that our energy may inadvertently take over other Ceremonies. One egg dies each month while a cleansing of our bodies, minds, spirits, and emotions prepares us for yet another cycle. The womb of creation resides within each woman whether we choose to give birth or not. Cycles continue in the circle of life regardless of where we come from or how we live our lives.

Red Tent

Are we aware of this power that naturally unfolds as we enter once again into our dark inward phase each month? It is our responsibility to learn what it means to be gifted these incarnations as women reclaiming our Moon Lodge. How do we do this? The answer is simple but seemingly difficult for our domestically trained minds in an increasingly technological time. We are living in a male dominated culture when production, efficiency, science, and reason are the focus. Feminine qualities which were once revered such as intuition, receptivity, and artistic expression are now viewed as a waste of time, frivolous, and lazy. While mother qualities are encouraged such as cooking, cleaning, and caring for our children, a balance is needed for us to have the energy to lovingly nurture others. Moon Lodge is a space where we can retreat from all responsibilities. Moon time is just 4 days out of each month when we, the women may recharge so that we are strong and empowered, ready to fulfill each of our specific life purposes while caring for our families in a joyful manner.

may 10 002

Regardless of the cycles taking place in our outer world, we must be aware of and honor our own cycles. Together we support one another while welcoming a return of this sacred space. Let’s turn off our cell phones, quiet our busy minds, retreat to our Moon Lodge, and listen to what the Spirits are telling us. In native teachings, spirit is in everything. We can keep trying to find that teacher or book but it all resides within each of us. The universe is one and the same whether it be from the Spirit in the from of a clear understanding in that “Aha” moment or in the form of a direct feeling from a tree or stone. During the dark phase of our moon cycle, when we are bleeding, women are even more receptive so it is extremely important for us to calm our minds and listen to the messages that we need to hear in order to help ourselves as well as our relations. This is a good time to pay particular attention to our dreams and write in a journal so that we can reflect on them later. When we are mooning it is an opportunity to pray for anyone that we might feel needs help. From deep within ourselves we may develop or give birth to something new and we are in tune with an inner knowing of what is and is not working in our lives. As the moon surrenders her light, women follow her example and prepare to shed their blood, retreating into the Moon Lodge to rest, reflect, and gather wisdom.

100_0014

Why do we call it moon time? The tides of the waters are regulated by Grandmother Moon and she watches over all the waters of the Earth. Just as Grandmother Moon watches over the waters of the Earth, women watch over the waters of the people. Feminine waters are always first followed by new life. The moon cycle is a gift to the women and we are especially close to Grandmother Moon because she governs the woman’s cleansing cycle. Second only to the ability of the Great Spirit to give new life, it is considered a time of extreme power. Some traditions believe that when women are on their moon time, the Creator comes closer to them. It is interesting to note that in the newer patriarchal religions the moon is seen as a dark satellite and bringer of negativity whereas in the older traditions of the Earth, the moon has always been seen as a life giving force.

teepee used for the peyote ceremony

Not to be crossed with the masculine fire element, moon energy is cool and feminine. In general, women pray with water (moon) while men pray with fire (sun). A ceremony of men and non mooning women centering around a fire might be simultaneously taking place with a circle of mooning women nearby. It is the responsibility of women to focus on the water instead of the fire as an additional fire burning with mooning women could be extremely dangerous. An unnatural increase in the flow of blood by the women in the Moon Lodge could occur. Another outcome could be that the energy of mooning women could completely take over the efforts of participants in the other ceremony which is counterproductive. Many ceremonies include men, women, and children but when it comes to subjects concerning women, it is meant only for women while discussions around men are meant only for men.

largetent

To understand the extreme power that exists during moon time as well as reverence for this influential energy, we can go back in time and explore cultures from around the world. All indigenous traditions would agree that a mooning woman’s energy could overpower a Ceremony and would encourage seclusion for any woman who is menstruating. From a Native American perspective, a woman who is on her moon time that is not being responsible can be detrimental to the entire tribe. It was believed that menstrual blood could interfere with the power that men needed for hunting. Because this energy is associated with the positive forces of life, it could overwhelm their power to kill. Hunters were instructed not to walk near a menstruating woman or to swim downstream from where she bathed. There is a mystical connection that is thought to exist between the blood of a mooning woman, the essence of life, and that of game. This would keep a tribe from acquiring the necessary food for survival. In Hinduism, moon time is recognized as such an essential cleansing of toxins (ama) and metabolic wastes that women are believed to outlive men. Apana vayu is an aspect responsible for the circulation and physical movement of energy, wastes materials and fluids down and out of the body. This is an excerpt from the Old Testament in Leviticus 15:19, part of Semitic mythology, “When a woman has her regular flow of blood, the impurity of her monthly period will last seven days, and anyone who touches her will be unclean until evening.”In Bali, a woman is not allowed to enter the kitchen to perform her usual duties, nor is she allowed to have sex with her husband while menstruating. She is to sleep apart from the family and has to keep her clothes that she wears while menstruating away from any clothes that she could wear to the temple.

cropped-111.jpg

This small handful of examples from various parts of our world reveals the importance of this part of a woman’s cycle. Something to consider interesting about the times we are living in now is how little this sacred moon time is actually recognized and respected. Could it be that secluding women during menstruation is inconvenient? Would a lack of attendees in Church interfere with the overall amount of money given? Is our present culture so repressed and confused that there is literally no acknowledgment? Are we just incredibly lazy? How could it be that women still continue to keep going like this?

november2011 010

On a practical level, we all need to make an effort to truly honor moon time by making some steps to change the recurring pattern of it being “just another day” and “just another moon time”. Not a time to be spent on the mundane of daily household chores, the veil between worlds is thin and is best spent in solitude or in a small group. Ideally we would have a house or room to return to each month that is clean, cozy, and accessible to rest and relax in. This is not always feasible so it is important for us to communicate with our families and friends about how important it is for everyone to acknowledge and respect this woman’s time. Perhaps, until this “space” is created we need to hang in there and with gentle assertiveness insist on some changes taking place in the home. Planning ahead helps so that when it is time to retreat, there is food prepared in the freezer or others in the house know that we are not responsible for everyone’s needs. What about the women taking turns feeding each other, doing laundry, watching kids, or other chores? Also, we each need to make this quiet time happen. Even if it is just for an hour, it is a start. It is perfectly O.K. to say no sometimes and we do not need to feel guilty for doing this. If we are routinely caring for ourselves then we will naturally have an inward peace that emanates from our being. The feeling of lack and overwhelm will be a thing of the past and then we have the energy to give to others.

_LAN9388

We pray for our sons, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, uncles, and nephews as well as for our feminine counterparts so that things can be brought back into balance. There is no time to dwell on the dysfunction of our world that we have collectively created. It is time to honestly look at ourselves and make changes where it is needed. The time of separation between women is over. Now we must, once again, connect with our fellow Queen Goddesses and create our Sacred Moon Lodge Temples. We are muske, sisters dancing together as we always have been.

download (1)

Ceremonial songs in the Lakota language

Spirit  Helpers
Spirit Helpers
logo FSICC7

Welcome to the Song page

To hear these songs just click on them!

Visit www.buffalogoddess.com

Por favor Donar! Bitte spenden Sie! Se il vous plaît don! Gelieve Doneer! Kérjük, segíts!

To keep this website alive ♥ Please make a donation ♥


Click here to read about additional song teachings


 Sweat Lodge Stone song

 Spotted Eagle song

Miye toka heya anpetu owakinyelo

Wanbli gleska wan heyaya u welo

Miye toka heya anpetu owakinyelo

As the sun rises, I am first to fly

A spotted eagle is coming saying this

As the sun rises, Iam first to fly

 Animal calling song

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo,

Wankantanhan wanbli gleska oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye.

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo.

Makata sinte sapela oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye.

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo.

Wankantanhan wahe oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From above, a spotted eagle nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From the earth, a black tailed deer nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From above, a mole nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

 Black Tail Deer Song 2

Maka kic’un pi, maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’in pi,

tuwa eheha wayelo, Maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’un pi, tuwa eheha wayelo

They wear their earth, they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth.

Someone I have made say they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth.

 Spider song

Maka sitomniyan, okiya wau yelo, Iktomi wan heyaya uwelo, Miye mawakan yelo.

Maka sitomniyan, okiya wau yelo, Iktomi wan heyaya uwelo, Miye mawakan yelo.

All over this world I come to help, a spider says these things as he comes, Me, I am sacred.

All over this world I come to help, a spider says these things as he comes, Me, I am sacred.

 Prayer song

Tunkasila Wakan Tanka heya hoye wayelo, Tunkasila Wakan Tanka heya hoye wayelo.

 Tunkasila omakiyayo makakijelo.

Grandfather, Great Spirit, a voice I am sending, Grandfather, Great Spirit, a voice I am sending.

Grandfather, help me for I am suffering.

 Kettle dog song

leceya sunka wan yuta pe, leceya sunka wan yuta pelo, wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan

sunka wan yutape wakan yutapelo

 Stone Calling Song

Hoyemakiyayo cemakiyayo, Taku ya chinkia iyece tu ktelo, Tunkan sabicya eya ce hoye wakiyelo.

Cemakiyayo hoyemakiyayo, Taku ya chinkia iyece tu ktelo, Tunkan sabicya eya ce hoye wakiyelo.

Send a voice to me, pray to me, What you want will be given to you, A blackened stone, you have said, So a voice I send to you.

Pray to me, send a voice to me, What you want will be given to you, A blackened stone, you have said, So a voice I send to you.

This is The Singing Stone’s Yuwipi set in the order that they are sung.

1. Pipe Filling Song

Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Canunpa wanji yuha ilatake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

 Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Hocoka wanji yuha ilotake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

English

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like, this My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

With this one Sacred Pipe sit down.

Remember as you fill the pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

In this one Sacred Circle sit down.

Remember as you fill your pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

Español

Mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi

Cuando se hace haci los abuelos bajan a verte

Con esta pipa sagrada siéntate

Recuerda que cuando llenas tu pipa

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede

Mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi

Cuando se hace así, los abuelos bajan a verte

Con esta pipa sagrada siéntate

Recuerda que cuando llenas tu pipa

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede

2. Song To Tie

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo, Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo,

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo ,Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo.

English

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me,

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me.

Espanol

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece

3. Yuwipi Altar song Is learned in person and should never be sung outside of ceremony.

4. Stone Song 1

Wakan oyate wan waniyang u ktelo, Wayankaya yo.

English

A sacred nation is appearing, Come and see.

Espanol

Una nación sagrada se levanta ven a ver.

5. Stone Song 2

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

English

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Espanol

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que has visto

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que has visto

6. Black Tail Deer Song

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo, Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

English

This is me visible I am standing, This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

Espanol

Este soy yo, visible, aquí de pie. Este soy yo, visible, aquí  de pie.

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

Este soy yo, visible aquí de pie

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

7. Mole Song

Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo, Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo.

Wahehela wan u welo, Wani yanku yelo.

Taku wakan wan echela, Wana u welo, Wana e yelo, Wani yanku welo.

English

From the earth something sacred is coming, From the earth something sacred is coming.

A mole is coming, It is coming to see you.

There is nothing not sacred, He is coming, He is here, It is coming to see you.

Espanol

Desde la tierra algo sagrado viene. Desde la tierra algo sagrado viene

Un topo viene., viene a verte.

No hay nada, que no sea sagrado, el viene, el esta aqui, viene a verte.

8. Bat Song

Hanhepi ki mita wayelo wayankiye yo, Hupakiglake wan heya u welo.

English

The night belongs to me  look this way, A bat has come, saying this.

Espanol

La noche me pertenece mira hacia aca,  Un murciélago ha venido diciendo esto.

9. Prayer Song

Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

Makasitomniyan hoye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

English

Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say

All over the world a voice I send, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say.

Espanol

Escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir

En todo el mundo una voz  envío, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir.

10. Doctoring Song

Wanktahan wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo,Wanktahan wau welo,

Wicatancan piya ,wakaginkta ca wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo.

English

Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming.

A body I am going to make well, so I am coming, Up above I am coming.

Espanol

Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo,

Un cuerpo voy a hacer bien, haci yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo.

11. Aurora Borealis Song

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo, Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo,

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

English

The aurora borealis this is me, The aurora borealis this is me

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

The aurora borealis this is me,

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

Espanol

La aurora borealis, este soy yo, La aurora borealis, este soy yo

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora

La aurora borealis, este soy yo

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora

12. Stone Doctoring Song

Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

Tunkan tatioblecha wan, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tip i ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

English

Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

The lodge of the stones, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

Dentro de las  chispas brilladoras yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

El temascal de piedras, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

13. Medicine Song

Pejuta wan cicu ktaca wayankiyeyo.

English

A medicine I am going to give you, look this way.

Espanol

Una medicina te voy a dar, mira hacia aca.

14. Spider Song

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

English

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Espanol

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la escuchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la escuchame.

  • Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibela escuchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la  escuchame.

15. Spider Song 2

Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo, tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

Tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

English

A spider comes walking, He comes walking, he comes walking,              A spider comes walking.

He comes walking, he comes walking, A spider comes walking.

Espanol

Una araña viene caminando, el viene caminando, el viene caminando.

Una araña viene caminando.

el viene caminando, el viene caminando Una arana viene caminando.

16. Thunder Being Song 1

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo.

English

Over here they are calling for me, Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation., My friends are calling for me.

Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation, My friends are calling for me.

Espanol

Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Desde el oeste una nación de seres relámpago, Mis amigos llaman por mi.

Por aqui estan llamando por mi,  Desde el oeste una nación de seres relámpago Mis amigos llaman por mi.

17. Thunder Being Song 2

Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

Tehi ya wamiconza pe, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

English

People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

A difficult time is predicted for me, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

Espanol

Gente muévase  hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muévase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

Un tiempo difícil  esta predecido para mi, Gente muévase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

18. Thunder Being Song 3

Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo

He wamakaskan wanji gyi Cante eiyapa wayelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo.

English

Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first.

I make some animals’ hearts beat, Over here I walk first.

Espanol

Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero.   

 Yo hago que  lata  el corazón  de algunos animales, Por aqui yo camino primero.

19. Thunder Being Song 4

Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lowan, Makasitomniya kola ceyakiya pelo wan, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lo .

English

Up above something sacred you have seen, Up above something sacred you have seen, All around the world you have prayed to him, Up above something sacred you have seen.

Espanol

En lo alto algo sagrado has visto, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto,

En todo el mundo has rezado por él, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto.

20. Calling Song

Tunkasila wamayank uye, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo

Ikce wicasa ta canunpa wan Yuha hoye wayelo

Mitakuye ob wani ktelo, Heyaya hoye wayelo.

English

Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me.

With the common people’s pipe I send a voice

So I may live with my relatives, I keep sending a voice.

Espanol

Abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme.

Con la pipa del pueblo, Yo mando una voz.

Par así  vivir con todas mis relaciones, Yo sigo mandando una voz.

21. Sone Song 3

Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo

Wankata inyan wan, Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo.

English

Voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Up above a stone, voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Espanol

Voces se escuchan, voces se escuchan, desde lo alto se escuchan voces, voces se escuchan, desde lo alto se escuchan voces, voces se escuchan

por encima de una piedra

22. Spider Untying Song (1)

Cokata wankan y mica kta ca, Cokata eya ya nawajin yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo.

English

He is preparing a sacred center for me, I am standing in the center sending a voice, My friend, you have said this, do it this way, My friend, you have said this, do it this way.

Espanol

El prepara un centro sagrado para mi, Estoy parado en el centro mandando una voz, Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, hazlo de esta forma, Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, hazlo de esta forma.

23. Dancing Song

Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

Inyan wasicun ca ,waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

English

Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

The white stone spirits, take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

Espanol

Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando,

Los espíritus  de piedra blanca, ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando.

24. Pipe Offering Song

Wayankiye, wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

Wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

English

Take a look, Take a look, Take a look,This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Take a look, Take a look, This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Espanol

Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Esta pipa es sagrada, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista,  Esta pipa es sagrada.

25. Offering Song

Lenake, wayang u yelo, Lenake hiyo uye

Waunye ki lena hoye miciciyiyo He mitakuye ob wani wacin yelo, Tunkasila omakiyayo.

Canli pahta ki lena hoye miciciyiyo, He mitakuye ob zaniya waon wacin yelo Tunkasila omakiyayo.

English

Look, all of these I have given you, Come take what I have offered you

With this cloth I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives I want to live, Grandfather help me.

With these tobacco ties I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives in good health I will live, Grandfather, help me.

Espanol

Mira todo esto que te e dado, Ven a coger lo que te e ofrecido

Con esta manta me ofresco hacia ti, Con mis relativos quiero vivir, Abuelo ayudame

Con estos amarres de tabacco me ofresco hacia ti . Con mis relativos en buena salud voy vivir, abuelo ayudame

26. Offering Song 2

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

Ikce wicasa ta canunpi ki leyuha, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

English

Sending a voice, sending a voice, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

A common man is holding this pipe, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

Espanol

Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este día

Un hombre común  aguanta una pipa, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este dia

 

27. Closing Song 1

Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, He mitakuye ob wani kta ca, Lena cicu welo.

English

Stone spirits have pity on us, Stone spirits have pity on us, With my relatives I will live, So I give you these offerings

Espanol

Espíritus  de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Espíritus de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Con toda relaciones yoy a vivir haci te ofresco todo esto

28. Closing Song 2

Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Tunkasila ta wokonze ca, Lena cicu welo. Hot aninyan kin najin pelo.

English

As we leave our voices are heard, As we leave our voices are heard, It is Grandfather’s will, That I give you these offerings. As we leave our voices are heard.

Espanol

Mientras partimos, nuestras voces se escuchan, Mientras partimos,nuestras voces se escuchan, Es la voluntad de el Abuelo, Que te doy estas ofrendas, Mientras partimos, nuestras voces se escuchan.

 29. Ending Song

Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo, Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

Anpetu okihica cicu welo, Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

English

My friend, I have given you these. Behold them, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

The day has made it possible to give you these offerings, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

Espanol

Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

El dia ha hecho  posible poder darte estas ofrendas, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

click here for a lyrics download (Microsoft word)

♥ Please make a tax deductible donation ♥


 

Ceremonial songs in the Lakota language and lakota sweat lodge song lyrics

Important Details
When singing this style of song, be sure to pay close attention to the drumbeat. It is either a fast steady beat or a slow thunder beat, like a heartbeat. Some of these songs are hard to play without the right beat. When singing along it is helpful to tap along with the drum. Another point of consideration is distinguishing between vocables and lyrics. Vocables are sounds and are not written among the lyrics. Usually the syllable and melody of the vocables match the lyrical part of the song. Usually the song begins with vocables. Very rarely are the vocables after the words.

When singing alone or without accompaniment you would sing the songs the way they are written. When singing with others you would use a call and response. That is when the song leader calls out the first line of the song; the group would then repeat that line. Some of these recordings have a call and response although they are written without it. As a rule of thumb with the call and response the group joins in just before the leader sings the vocable sound He. This sound is found at the end of some of the sentences He.

Other things to consider in singing these songs

Some of these songs are specific to particular lineages. In that case only one or two words may be different from one tiospaye to another. Most of these songs are general and are sung by many groups and at different ceremonies. An animal calling song is for calling in the power of specific animals. A stone song is for calling in the powers of stones. Be sure you are not calling things unnecessarily.

These songs are very powerful and not to be idly whistled or sung in the shower. Put down a pinch of tobacco as an offering first. This can be placed in a special spot, it can be rubbed or sprinkled upon the drum. A little water is good for the spirit of the drum, but before singing songs always put down tobacco. It is important not to “cry wolf” with the spirits. If these songs are sung idly too much the Spirits may stop responding.

By learning songs from a C.D. or computer they may attract lesser nearby spirits. They may not have the same impact until they are sung along within a genuine tradition. The more powerful spirits follow an oral line of association that is lost without actual contact with lineage holders. By singing and learning these songs here the spirits may eventually draw you into the ceremonies and traditions that use them.

Do not sing any thunder being songs at night out of context. This will attract ghosts, it could be very dangerous. Thunder being songs call thunder beings during the day and ghosts at night. Honestly, one should never really sing any kind of song carelessly outside at night. In the event of attracting ghosts sing the “Sending the Spirits Home” closing song. It is good to know that song to send spirits back home, especially when it is helpful to them. Thunder being songs include any heyoka or kettle songs. The dog song should only be sung at the Kettle Dance unless practicing.

Healing songs are for doctoring people. The songs themselves are a healing medicine. They can be sung in sweat lodge, Yuwipi, or on their own as a treatment. Canupa songs (pipe songs) should generally be sung when the pipe is present. If you carry a canupa it is O.K. to sing those songs whenever but always give a tobacco offering to the drum, especially when rehearsing. Pipe filling songs should only be sung while loading the pipe facing west. Again it is alright in the process of learning to sing the pipe filling songs, having offered tobacco to the drum and ending your lessons with the “Sending the Spirits Home” closing song.
There are various different closing songs when reaching near the end of a ceremony. For instance, in the fourth round of the sweat lodge one might sing a closing offering song. Be sure to check with your leaders about this as they vary from tradition to tradition. Some of our closing songs may not be used by other lineages to close. It all depends on what the spirit helpers of a tradition are used to. When visiting a sweat lodge you know little about it would be safest to not lead any closing songs at all.

There are a handful of songs not available here that are too specific. These are the opening Yuwipi/Lowanpi songs for calling in the directional spirits. They vary from ceremony to ceremony and from one medicine man to another. To get these songs you will have to learn them in ceremony. That is the only time those songs are ever sung. By learning all of these songs on our site we will become a Lowan Wicasa (song man) or a Lowan Winyan (song woman). Although not a prerequisite to being a medicine man or woman in the Lakota tradition you would have to be crazy to even attempt to embark on that path without most of these songs. Singers are integral to these ways, anyone knowing all of these songs are needed and honored regardless of race, creed, or color. If you put yourself out there you could travel the world over with expenses paid just singing at ceremonial events.

Sundance coyote song

kola lemiyeca he wau welo, kola lemiyeca he wau welo,

wama yanka yo wau welo, anpe wi ki iyoh’late he

ociciya kinte ca he wau welo, wama yanka yo wau welo wau welo,

kola lemiyeca he wau welo, kola lemiyeca he wau welo,

wama yanka yo wau welo, hanhe wi ki iyoh’late he

ociciya kinte ca he wau welo, wama yanka yo wau welo wau welo.

My friend, this is me that is coming, My friend, this is me that is coming

Look at me, I am coming, Under the sun, I have something to say

I have something to tell you, that is why, Look at me, I am coming

My friend, this is me that is coming, My friend, this is me that is coming

Look at me, I am coming, Under the moon, I have something to say

I have something to tell you, that is why, Look at me, I am coming

Stone Song 

Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo, Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo.

Tunkasila wamayanguye, Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo.

All around the earth I am sending a voice, All around the earth I am sending a voice.

Grandfather hear me, All around the earth I am sending a voice.

Pipe Song

Maka cokayan canunpa wan ahi unpahpelo wayankiyeyo,Hecaya uha hoye wayelo.

Thank you Song

Wakan tanka tunkasila, Wakan tanka tunkasila, Pilamaya yelo, Canunpa wakan ca mayaku welo, Pilamaya yelo, Wicozani wa mayaku welo, Pilamayaye pilamaya yelo.

Canunpa wakan ca mayaku welo, Pilamaya yelo, Wicozani wa mayaku welo, Pilamayaye pilamaya yelo.

Great Spirit, grandfather, Great Spirit, grandfather, I thank you, You have given me a sacred canunpa, Thank you, You have given me a good healing, Thank you, thank you.

You have given me a sacred canunpa, Thank you, You have given me a good healing, Thank you, thank you.

Heyoka Thunder Being Song:

Makpiya mimemeya canku yape, Makpiya mimemeya canku yapelo, Henake akicita pica winyan wakan a canku yapelo.

Makpiya mimemeya canku yape, Henake akicita pica taku wakan a canku yapelo.

Clouds circling is their road, Clouds circling is their road, They are warriors, upon a road around a sacred woman.

Clouds circling is their road, They are warriors, upon a road around a sacred thing.

Hanbleceya Song 1

Tekiya wahi najin yelo, Tekiya wahi najin yelo, kola wamayankiyo.

Tekiya wahi najin yelo kola wamayankiyo.

Wiohpeyata kiya hoye wayelo kola wamayankiyo, Tekiya wahi najin yelo kola wamayankiyo

With difficulity I am standing, With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

A voice I have sent to the West, friend take a look at me.

With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

Prayer Song

Makpia tipiwa ogna micagelo helo, Tunkashila ehapikun lecanu we

A dwelling in the clouds, he has made for me, Grandfather you have said and done this.

Ghost Nation Song

Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo, Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo, Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo.

Anpo hinapeki itokabya tuwa Lowanpe hena ehapi ca, Kola lowanpelo.

Somewhere my friends they are singing, Somewhere my friends they are singing, Somewhere my friends they are singing

They have said this, My friends they are singing

Prayer Song

Hoksila wamayankayo, hoksila wamayankayo, Miyohan wan wakanca wanji koyag Cinktelo, anpe wikiheyaca kola wayelo.

Child, take a look at me, child take a look at me, My power I have made you wear in a sacred manner ,The sun has said this, so I am his friend.

Doctoring Song

Ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye, Winyan ta canupi ki, ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Winyan ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Ga glinajin miye Ikce wicasa ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Ikce wicasa ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

It has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

a woman’s pipe had made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

A woman’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it It has made me stand before it.

The common man’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

The common man’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

Prayer Song

Wankantanka unsimala yo, He makakijelo, Canupa kile he uha hoye wayelo

Wankantanka unsimalayo, He makakijelo, Canupa kile he uha hoye wayelo

Great Spirit have pity on me, For I am suffering, This pipe I have prayed with

Great Spirit have pity on me, For I am suffering, This pipe I have prayed with

Stone Song

Inyan wan hinajin wayanka piye

Before you a stone I have made appear. Come and see.

Black Tail Deer Song
Maka kic’un pi, maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’in pi,

tuwa eheha wayelo, Maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’un pi, tuwa eheha wayelo

They wear their earth, they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth

Someone I have made say they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth

Stone Song

Hokaowin u welo, Hokaowin u welo, Inyanwan wakan yankina, wana Hokaowin u welo

Hokaowin u welo wakanyan u welo

It is coming around, It is coming around, A stone in a sacred manner, Now it is coming around

In a sacred manner it is coming.

Doctoring Song

Inajin yo he waniyankinte,Tunkashila he waniyankintelo, Inajin yo he waniyankintelo.

Inajin yo he waniyankinte, Tunkashila he waniyankintelo, Inajin yo he waniyankintelo.

Stand up, he is going to take a look at you, Grandfather is going to take a look at you, Stand up, he is going to take a look at you.

Stand up, he is going to take a look at you, Grandfather is going to take a look at you, Stand up, he is going to take a look at you.

 

Hanbleceya song

kola kawinga yo ehapelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo. wiohpeyata inawajina ahitun nawajin yelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo.

my friend turn around you have said,my friend turn around you have said, my friend turn around you have said.to the west I stand looking toward you, my friend turn around you have said.

Rules for singing Lakota Ceremonial Songs

Important Details about Ceremonial songs

“Rules for singing Lakota Ceremonial Songs”




Click here for songs!

  When singing this style of song, be sure to pay close attention to the drumbeat.  It is usually either a fast steady beat, Like a ruffle, or a slow thunder beat or like a heartbeat. In general there are these two types of drum beat with many different styles and variations, fast and slow. Some of these songs are hard to play without the right beat. Slow songs work best with a fast beat while fast songs seem to fit a slow beat  When singing along and not drumming it is helpful to tap along with the drummers. this will help to learn the correct rhythm.

The easiest mistake in the act of singing Lakota songs is singing to the beat of the drum. We are taught in school to clap to time with a song. In most drumming systems of Indigenous cultures and even our modern culture, we use an off beat. While clapping, most of us use an on beat rather than an off beat. An on beat is the opposite of an off beat.

Usually, when clapping one would start a song with the clap and the clapping would happen at each syllable, that’s the on beat. What you want is the drum beat between each syllable, starting the song after the clap and the syllables of the lyrics occurring between the beats. Lets use an example, the song “Mary had a little lamb”, what you want is to hear the drum beat * between the syllables. Ma*ry* had* a *li*ttle* lamb*. Like that.

A good way to get it right is to practice drumming with a heart beat (thunder beat), that’s a two beat. One two, one two, one two, the “one” being the loud beat and the “two” being the more quiet of the heart beat. Practice starting the song on the “two”. If you were clapping you would start the song when your hands are furthest apart and each syllable would occur when your hands are apart (the off beat).

 Another point of consideration is distinguishing between vocables and lyrics. Vocables are sounds and are not written among the lyrics.  Usually the syllables and melody of the vocables match the lyrical part of the song. Vocables can be compared to the European equivalent: Fa La La La La, La La La La (deck the halls).  Usually songs containing vocables, begin with vocables. Very rarely are the vocables after the lyrics or between the words.

When singing alone or without accompaniment you would sing the songs the way they are written.  When singing with others you would use a call and response.  That is when the song leader calls out the first line of the song; the group would then repeat that line. Ladies would join in on the third line, unless of course there are only two singers, a man and a woman. Some of these recordings have a call and response although they are written without it. As a rule of thumb with the call and response the group joins in just before the leader sings the vocable sound He.  This sound is found at the end of some of the sentences, He.

Other things to consider in singing these songs

Some of these songs are specific to particular lineages. In that case only one or two words may be different from one Tiospaye (family lineage)  to another. Most of these songs are general and are sung by many groups and at different ceremonies. An animal calling song is for calling in the power of specific animals. A stone song is for calling in the spirits of stones. Be sure you are not calling things unnecessarily.

Saguache

These songs are very powerful and not to be idly whistled or sung in the shower. Put down a pinch of tobacco as an offering first. This can be placed in a special spot, it can be rubbed or sprinkled upon the drum. A little water is good for the spirit of the drum, but before singing songs always put down tobacco. It is important not to “cry wolf” with the spirits. If these songs are sung idly too much the Spirits may stop responding.

By learning songs from a C.D. or computer they may only attract lesser nearby spirits. They may not have the same impact until they are sung along within a genuine tradition. The more powerful spirits follow an oral line of association that is lost without actual contact with lineage holders. By singing and learning these songs here the spirits may eventually draw you into the ceremonies and traditions that use them.

Kid's songs

Thunder Being songs are for addressing the Thunder Beings who are the law enforcement branch of the Creator.They sung to invoke the healing power of the thunders. Do not sing any thunder being songs at night out of context. Thunder being songs call thunder beings during the day and ghosts at night. Honestly, one should never really sing any kind of song carelessly outside at night. In the event of attracting ghosts sing the sending the spirits home Closing Song and the Ending Song. It is good to know these songs to send spirits back home, especially when it is helpful to them.

Thunder being songs include any Heyoka or “kettle songs”.  Heyoka people, or sacred fools, may sing these songs at other occasions. If you are not initiated as a Heyoka, meaning that if you have not performed a kettle dance successfully, you should avoid singing these songs out of context. Any one can sing most of the Thunder Being songs in the sweat lodge and yuwipi ceremonies provided that they are followed by the proper closing and ending songs.

When Heyoka people sing, since they are contrary to the proper way, they will use an “on beat” with the drum rather than an “off beat”. The dog song should only be sung at the Kettle Dance (Heyoka Initiation). Heyoka people may sing this song out of turn, don’t do this, it is asking for the spirits to “take” a dog as an offering.

Healing songs are for doctoring people. The songs themselves are a healing medicine. They can be sung in sweat lodge, Yuwipi, or on their own as a treatment. Canupa songs (pipe songs) should generally be sung when the pipe is present. If you carry a canupa it is okay to sing those songs whenever but always give a tobacco offering to the drum, especially when rehearsing. Pipe filling songs should only be sung while loading the pipe facing west. Again it is alright in the process of learning to sing the pipe filling songs, having offered tobacco to the drum and ending your lessons with the “Sending the Spirits Home” closing song.

There are various different closing songs when reaching near the end of a ceremony. For instance, in the fourth round of the sweat lodge one might sing a closing offering song. Be sure to check with your leaders about this as they vary from tradition to tradition. Some of our closing songs may not be used by other lineages to close. It all depends on what the spirit helpers of a tradition are used to. When visiting a sweat lodge you know little about it would be safest to not lead any closing songs at all.

class

There are a handful of songs not available here that are too specific. These are the opening Yuwipi/Lowanpi songs for calling in the directional spirits. They vary from ceremony to ceremony and from one medicine man to another. To get these songs you will have to learn them in ceremony. That is the only time those songs are ever sung.

Always remember the origins of these songs, some of them are 12 thousand years old, some of them are relatively new. The important part is that they came to people through dreams and visions and were not composed in a mundane fashion. A song, then, connects to a spirit, a group of spirits and a person.

In essence it is not essential to know the meaning of a song for it to be effective. It is really good to know the meaning, but the songs are for the spirits. There should not be any element of performance in singing these songs. All these songs are for the sake of the spirits, not for entertainment purposes. Some domestic scholars are under the impression that the drum is used to lull the people into a “trance like state”. The drum is to call the spirits, any “trance like states” should be attributed to the presents of the spirits.

By learning all of these songs on our site we will become a Lowan Wicasa (song man) or a Lowan Winyan (song woman). Although not a prerequisite to being a medicine man or woman in the Lakota tradition you would have to be crazy to even attempt to embark on that path without most of these songs. Singers are integral to these ways, anyone knowing all of these songs are needed and honored regardless of race, creed, or color. If you put yourself out there you could at least get well fed!