Inipi Wakan

 Sweat Lodge

Inipi Wakan

Said to be the oldest rite, the Sweat Lodge Ceremony is one of purification. Individuals crawl to the left (ladies first) and clockwise to their spots. Hot lava rocks are heated outside of the lodge on a fire. They are then carried into a cloth covered willow frame hut to be placed into a pit. After the door is shut the inside of the lodge is pitch black with the exception of the red stones which we often refer to as the Grandmothers and Grandfathers.

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 Herbs such as cedar and sweetgrass are then placed on the stones to assist in the healing of the Ceremony. Hot steam envelopes the lodge as the leader pours water upon the glowing stones. The loud drum throbs steadily as the singers join in with the appropriate songs. Participants are encouraged to connect in their own prayer to Great Spirit (God) while focusing on what is needing attention at that particular time. When the time is right someone calls out, Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! or All of My Relations! The flap is then opened. We do this for 4 doors and then exit the lodge to enjoy a feast together.

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Fire          Sweat Lodge Preparatory Details                                                                                                     

The Singing Stone would like to warmly invite you back to the womb of the mother in our traditional Inipi or sacred sweat lodge ceremony.

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Arriving 1/2 hour to 1 hour prior to the stated time for each inipi is suggested. By arriving early individuals become better acquainted and allows them time to make prayer ties. These ties are used in to project intentions (make prayers) before hand. Details like this may vary according to the situation or the intercessor. Lodges may last anywhere from 1 to 3 hours. Please bring a towel and a change of clothing if necessary. Women typically wear a long dress that covers the shoulders or a skirt and t-shirt. Men usually wear swim trunks. We would ask that women having their sacred menses or moon time to stay out of the lodge in order to maintain the energy in a flowing manner. Ladies on menses are welcome to stay in the house if they like. Please leave your pets at home and do not attend our Ceremonies intoxicated. We are happy to offer a clean, drug free environment.

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In our lineage it is tradition to offer tobacco to the person pouring water so we require everyone to bring this offering. We do not place a fee on Ceremonies. However, donations are what helps us to continue offering Native Teachings. We can always use donations of firewood, flat cedar leaf, sweetgrass, prayer tie material, and blankets. Monetary donations are the most needed. We look forward to joining in prayer to share with one another.

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Dream Dance

PETA WAKAN   Dream Dance   PETA WAKAN

The Singing Stone inherited an ancient bundle in October of 2013. This bundle was found alongside Ghost Dance equipment and has not been opened or used for the past 120 years. After unwrapping the bundle during Vision Quest Ceremony, it was found to be a Dream Society Dance Bundle. Many ancient medicine bundles are being reopened nowadays because the time has come for these ways to be practiced again. With their mysteries being unraveled they are being put to use in the magical ways which they were intended. This particular bundle and the way that we received it has been truly miraculous. Now is the time for the reemergence of the Dream Society and it’s annual Dance.teepee we used for the peyote ceremony

 The Singing Stone,   Crestone, CO

conjurespirits@gmail.com  

www.thesingingstone.com

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The Dream Dance is the initiation and entrance into the Dream Society. This celebration is an dance that happens four years in a row. Those wishing to dance would commit to dancing four nights. The Ceremony begins with a Sweat Lodge every evening and every morning with another Sweat Lodge. Dancers assemble around the sacred fire at dusk and dance four different intervals throughout the night.

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Preparations: Through our dreams we will know what animal or power we represent. As participants we may wear body paint and regalia according to our dreams. We do ask that everyone dancing wears shoes that they do not wear outside of Ceremonies such as moccasins or are barefoot. There are no strict guidelines for what to wear. The important thing is to follow the guidance from Spirit.

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Communicating through dreams is an important task for dancers to bring their specific representation into this dance. Ideas to connect to Dream time and to receive a clear message are to make a dream altar, pray, send a letter, or manifest an object from a dream. If clear messages are not received from dreams, there is no need to worry. Everyone has an intuitive connection of the energies to bring into this realm through meditation or by what objects surround us. Participating in the Dream Dance will heighten this vital connection to Dream Time. We suggest that any dancer who partakes of drugs or alcohol refrains from that, in order to help clear the pathways to receive messages. As all with all of our Ceremonies, pets, drugs, and alcohol are not permitted. Each of us is responsible for our own bedding, tent, chair (if needed), and special food requirements.

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Moontime: Women on their moon time (menses) would not participate in the Dream Dance. If a woman’s moon time were to come during the dance she would withdraw from dancing or supporting to a secluded place. The Singing Stone supports this important aspect of a woman’s power during this time and there will be a space provided for all women to be in their own Sacred Ceremony.

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To donate food or other miscellaneous necessities please contact Mimi who is in charge of organizing:

sowelusuray@gmail.com

 Some ideas for donations are wood, toilet paper, trash bags, disposable plates and utensils, food/drinks.

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We will send out directions to the Dream Dance closer to the scheduled date. Now is the time for the reemergence of the Dream Society and its annual dance. See you soon. Mitakuye Oyasin!

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This dance serves to connect the people to their dreams. By dancing one can strengthen the connection to the animals or powers of one’s dreams by dancing as that animal or power. Dancers would only fast from food that conflicts with the animal or power that they represent. For instance, if someone were representing elk, they would not eat elk meat.

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 This celebration is the initiation and entrance into the Dream Society. This event will be happening on the National Forest or elsewhere in our area. Anyone who is interested in joining The Dream Society please contact us. Everyone is welcome to participate or support our Spring Ceremonials.

 

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Eastern View from Building site

Bear Dance

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Each year, at Eagle’s Nest Center in Westfield, Wisconsin, Robert and Judy hold their annual spring Bear Dance. All are welcome to experience this empowering and uplifting ceremony.

Join us in Westfield, Wisconsin each year for the spring time Bear Dance!!!

We warmly welcome all to participate in this annual dance. Be a part of the Bear society by joining in the festivities. This dance is all inclusive and does not require too many commitments.

 Each dancer will make prayer flags as well as prayer ties. These items will be made just before dancing, so bring a yard of red, yellow, black and white cotton fabric. Bring a quarter yard of blue, green and purple cotton fabric.

For more information on this contact us:

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Canupa Ceremony

Canupa Ceremony

 To some the canupa ( sacred pipe ) is thought of as the peace pipe or calumet. To us it is more than that, it is the promise of the White Buffalo Calf Maidens’ return and a direct connecting link to the divine. The Canupa is the most important object as it represents the direct communication with the source of all life, sentient and insentient alike.

The word Canupa, pronounced Chan-unpa, in the Lakota language means smoking stick, or simply, pipe.   Pte Ska Win (Pte San Wi), or the White Buffalo Calf Maiden appeared to the people presenting them with the Canupa (pipe) made from a buffalo’s shin bone. Along with this gift the people received a small round stone of Caitlinite  as well as instructions for The Seven Sacred Rites.

1. The Inipi (Sweat Lodge Ceremony)
2.The Hanbleceya (crying for a vision)
3.The Ghost Keeping Ceremony (Wanagi yuhapi)
4.The Sun Dance (Wi Wanyang wacipi)
5.The Hunka Ceremony (‘the making of relatives)
6.The Girl’s Puberty Rite (Isnati awicalowan)
7.The Throwing of the Ball Ceremony (Tapa wankayeyapi). 

Some people would say that this list is inaccurate and it may well be. What we do know is that a sacred woman with supernatural powers gave the pipe with it’s 7 rites to the people. She also gave a song, White Buffalo Calf Woman Song, as well as the promise to return to the people one day. The true story of Pte Ska Win is not as popular as it’s Christian version, but here we will speak about the Sacred pipe and leave the rest of the story for others to tell.

 Aside from the seven rites is the Canupa Ceremony itself. The pipe’s stone bowl and the stem is smudged in the smoke of the Mugwort plant, (somtimes reffered as sage). The two are then joined together symbolizing the connection with the divine. The pipe is filled with Red willow inner-bark usually while singing Canunpa Olawan, (pipe song). This is done at the start of all of the seven rites as well as any important occasion.

The Canupa is passed clockwise being sure not to separate the stone bowl from the wooden stem. Participants take 4 small puffs and pass the pipe along. Those who don’t wish to puff on the pipe simply touch there shoulders and the top of their head with the pipe’s stem in blessing. Among some groups this can be a very elaborate ordeal, but among the humble it is a very plain and simple act. The pipe is seen as the most important object, it is the greatest means of communicating with the divine.

The original Canupa is believed to be kept in a place known as Green Grass on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, but no one knows for sure. A lot of controversy still surrounds this issue. The importance here is to remember that Pte Ska Win brought it to the people. Do this by keeping it sacred, not blending it with foreign concepts, and understanding its’ history! The use of the Canupa was given to the Lakota people by the White Buffalo Calf Maiden along with the Seven Sacred Rites hundreds of years ago according to Lakota records painted on buffalo hides.

The Sacred Pipe itself, according to Archaeologists, may have started any where from about 4,000 to 14,000 years ago. Countless thousands of pipes have been unearthed from the Hopewell culture in the Ohio Valley, some of which represent woolly mammoth and manatee!

Yuwipi Ceremony

YUWIPI CEREMONY

        We believe in the night sing, the power of Inyan the stone, the miraculous healing power of the ancestors and the sacred songs.  We believe in the Wiwila Little people, animal spirits, and the various other Tunkasila (spirits). We believe in the emptiness of the Medicine Man as a hollow bone for the spirits’ work.

Yuwipi Ceremony

Click this link to read Yuwipi details before attending.

Painted Buffalo Skull

A Yuwipi  Ceremony is known as a Night Sing. Invocation songs are sung in a darkened room to call upon the help of woodland spirits. Fairies, little people, stone spirits, and animals arrive creating an almost indescribable situation.  This ritual is a profound experience of spiritual beings manifesting into the physical.

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If you are planning to attend a Yuwipi\Lowanpi, there are some details that must be mentioned.

Women on their Moon Time (menses) may not attend this Ceremony. Women who do attend must be fully clothed covering shoulders and knees. It is traditional for women to wear a shawl but not mandatory. No shiny objects or electronics are allowed (cell phones, watches, or jewelry). Children are welcome to attend and usually fall asleep so blankets and pillows are helpful. Participants may bring a pillow or blanket to sit on as well. There will be no bathroom breaks so try not to drink large amounts of liquid before the Ceremony. 

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This ceremony truly defines what Shamanism is and it is considered by many anthropologists and archaeologists to have been the Neanderthal’s primary religion. The Yuwipi, Sweat Lodge and Vision quest are considered a trinity of rites. This practice is used for healing, connecting with spirits, finding things and solutions to problems.  We begin with a sweat lodge rite (Inipi) and an explanation of the evening’s events (hanblagloka).1.16.11 008

The Medicine Man is bound within a sacred blanket and laid down upon a special altar to commune with spirits and enter into their world.  Flickering lights can be seen in the darkness along with many other hard to describe things.  The spirits are able to remove illnesses from people as well as answer questions from beyond.  The spirits can be sent to find lost objects or people and even perform healings outside of the circle.  Yuwipi is also known as the tent shaking rite and is famous for its levitation and other unexplained phenomenon.  This experience lasts a few hours and always takes place after dusk.  The event is followed by a meal and another optional sweat lodge the next morning.

Listen to Yuwipi songs by clicking this link !

PETA WAKAN

The Night Sing, or Lowanpi, is probably the most fascinating rite in the western hemisphere. Anthropologists believe that it has its origins in Siberia and that it spread from there to many places throughout the world. It is believed to have been practiced in Nepal and northern China thousands of years ago.  There are ancient traces of it among the Laplander, The Mongols, The Icelandic peoples and The Amazonian. Recent findings suggest it was prevalent among the Maya and Aztec.

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Ainu of Japan

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In the 1960′s it is said to have died out in Siberia but it has made a recent come back from North America. Versions of the Yuwipi/Lowanpi have long been practiced by tribes of the Northern and Eastern United states. The Tent Shaking rite among the Ojibwa were well documented in the 1800s, as well as the various plains tribes.

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When the Medicine Man is tied and bound it is known as a Yuwipi rather than Lowanpi, which uses no bindings. It is this act of tying, untying, the frame drum, as well as the general events of the ceremony are what allowed Anthropologists to trace the yuwipi to Siberia and beyond. The Canli Pahta, or prayer ties are a purely Lakota element in this beautiful practice.

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Recently, people say things like “these ceremonies came about when our people had to hide their spiritual practices”. These views are inconsistent with Anthropological and Archaeological facts as the Yuwipi is thought of as the Neanderthal’s primary religion. The Yuwipi, Sweat Lodge and Vision quest are considered a trinity of rites. There is some question that the Yuwipi/Lowanpi was ever one of the Seven Sacred Rites of the White Buffalo Calf Woman. Elders have varying opinions on the subject. In the case of the Lakota version of Yuwipi, the  Prayer Ties and the use of the Sacred Pipe were, at some point, added to the Yuwipi. Similarly  songs as well as other elements have come from the Yuwipi/Lowanpi and entered into the Sundance.

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These ways may have come from Siberia, but the reverse may be the case just as well. One thing is definite, the Yuwipi, Inipi (Sweat Lodge) and Hanbleceya (Vision Quest) spread with the mastodon hunters who followed the herds. It is Well documented that the yuwipi, the ceremony that truly defines Shamanism, moved with the migration of the mastodon. The Lakota primarily hunted Unhcegila (Mastodon), as did various other tribes.

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The healing that occurs in these ceremonies  may not be accompanied by any tactile sensations. This does not affect the power of the healing.  The most difficult manifestation seems to be for the spirits to make sound. Auditory experiences seem to occur less (the singing or speaking of spirits) than tactile ones. There are no real generalizations though, it is up to the Spirits alone, next it is up to the Medicine Man’s relationship with those beings and last but not least the faith of the participants.

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It is strange to see the (new-age) shamanic drumming sessions that are so popular now. This practice is directly mimicking the ancient ways without any of the outward manifestations or initiation  that are usual to these ceremonies. On the same token, it is Interesting to note that certain individuals are born with, or acquire the ability to create situations characteristic to Yuwipi. Daniel Dunglas Home and Carlos Mirabelli are two individuals known to have brought about such situations outside of Native American culture.

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First thing one could experience in a Yuwipi or Lowanpi is levitation and movement the rattles and various other objects. Second thing would be flickering lights, rain, hail, wind and other similar sensations. The third type of manifestation one could expect is the touch of a spirit’s hand, the touch of an animal, Little person, or other such being’s touch. The fourth thing that can happen is teleportation.

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The Yuwipi man may experience asphyxiation, usually followed by resurrection. This is not always the case as sometimes “the man in the middle” experiences dream like visions and communications without flat-lining. The visions are usually followed by the untying. The untying does not always occur, even in profound situations. Another thing that the Yuwipi man may experience is levitation, being touched or lifted. Other than that, the Yuwipi man Has a very different experience from the rest of the people.

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A Yuwipi man has a tremendous responsibly as he literally lays his life down for the sake of the people. He is fettered not only by his bindings but by the Yuwipi Spirits themselves  He is no longer a free man, in this life, or the next. It is said that each time he holds a ceremony he sacrifices part of his soul until his power is finally exhausted. After passing he works as a healer from the other side, though the ceremonies. I say “man” because it is for the “empty” man to be the (hollow bone) sacrifice for the fullness of the woman. There are accounts, though, of women, that after menopause, have done Lowanpi-like ceremonies. One does not DECIDE to practice Yuwipi, They are chosen during Hanbleceya (Vision Quest). Do not reach out to the yuwipi spirits. let them reach out to you (this saying is meant figuratively as well as literally). 

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The Yuwipi ritual may be held for very specific purposes.  Among them are healings, finding lost or stolen objects, and finding solutions to problems.   It is part of a trinity of rights, Yuwipi, Sweat lodge and Vision Quest.  After performing a sweat lodge, the rite begins in a room in which all lights can be extinguished.  The leader or Yuwipi man is bound within a quilt and laid face down in the center of the room, (Yuwipi means they tie him up).  The room is plunged into total darkness as the lead singer begins to drum and sing with great enthusiasm.  In the darkness the spirits play the rattles and untie the leader.

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The lights are turned on and the Yuwipi man narrates the events of the ceremony and the sacred Canupa is passed round.  This all takes about four to six hours and is an evening event.  Yuwipi is followed by a  pot luck. The Yuwipi is an important Ceremonial that we are excited to have in our community as well as visitors from all over.

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Singing for the Yuwipi/ Lowanpi ceremonies

Singing for Yuwipi / Lowanpi is a very serious matter. The lead singer and the accompaniment should not take it lightly. It is of utmost importance for the singer to be able to sense the man in the middle within the cover of total darkness as well as the coming and going of the various spirits that may be present. To get started the sacred Canupa will be filled with Cancasa with the accompaniment of the Pipe filling song or Opagipi Olowan. Sometimes two other pipe songs may be sung with it. Then for the tying this song can be sung although it is not necessary. Sometimes a special tying song is sung.

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It is important that this all happens swiftly and without delay (tying). As soon as the man is in the center face down the lights are extinguished and the directional song (Tatetopakiya Olowan) is sung. There are some very important things to know about this song. This song is received by the medicine man during vision quest and is his personal song. It is sometimes known as an altar song or as Wicakicopi Olowan (they call them song). This type of song can only be learned in person unless a regular directional song is being used. A good example of this would be the directional song of the sweat lodge.

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Following the Directional song one usually hears spirit calling songs. This is usually accompanied by the spirit’s rapping,  shaking rattles (Wagmuha) or any such manifestations signalling the spirit’s arrival. These songs may vary greatly as each medicine person will need to call particular spirits. This part of the ceremony is leading up to the prayer round in which the intention will be stated to the spirits. Questions may be put to the spirits if needed or sometimes they may be dispatched to look in on a situation or to do something.

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Prayer songs would be sung in preparation of the prayers. They are sung immediately following the calling songs in one continuous stream of music. The music then comes to a halt. Prayers will be made by the sponsor,  the Leader, the helper or by all present  depending on the ceremony’s purpose. After the prayers are made, singing would resume as the healing round begins.  Healing songs would be sung after the prayers as the spirits get to work on the sponsor and whomever requests to receive a healing. This usually happens after the prayer round. In some cases calling songs or animal songs could be added to these to effect a cure.

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Depending on the medicine men a wide variety of songs can be sung now. It is common to hear Kettle songs, Ceh’ohomni Olowan. These are better known as Heyoka songs or Thunder being songs. These clown songs originally are used as part of the Kettle Dance and other Heyoka rites. It is said that the ghosts of the Heyoka Medicine men intervene in the Yuwipi /Lowanpi ceremony to affect a cure, who really knows? These songs may be sung solely to call the Thunder beings as well as other related spirits.

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Many other songs can be sung, there are the stone songs, spider songs, and all the various animal songs. The spirits Do the untying with the untying song. This song is known as Wicayujujupi Olowan. No matter how the ceremony progresses or how it is performed or whatever, the Spirits go home song and the closing song ( quitting ) are always sung. Sometimes a few songs are sung  just before this.

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The singers actually call the spirits, they are the conjurers. The Yuwipi man is the conduit or medium of the spirits work. Usually, the spirits choose new yuwipi men from among the singers.

(If you feel you are chosen to do yuwipi first learn the songs, at least 28- 56 of them)

 

PETA WAKAN

Check our Events Calendar !

Una ceremonia Yuwipi es conocido como Night Sing. Cantos de invocación se cantan en un cuarto oscuro para recurrir a la ayuda de los espíritus del bosque. Hadas, gente pequeña, los espíritus de piedra, y los animales llegan creando una situación casi indescriptible. Este ritual es una experiencia profunda de los seres espirituales que se manifiestan en lo físico.

Esta ceremonia realmente define lo que es el chamanismo y es considerado por muchos antropólogos y arqueólogos que han sido la religión principal del Neanderthal. Esta práctica se utiliza para la curación, la conexión con los espíritus, la búsqueda de las cosas y las soluciones a los problemas. Comenzamos con un sudor lodge rito opcional y una explicación de los acontecimientos de la noche.

The Medicine Man está obligado dentro de un manto sagrado y lo acostó en un altar especial para estar en comunión con los espíritus y entrar en su mundo. Luces parpadeantes se pueden ver en la oscuridad junto con muchos otros difíciles de describir las cosas. Los espíritus son capaces de eliminar las enfermedades de las personas, así como responder a las preguntas de más allá.Los espíritus pueden ser enviados a buscar objetos o personas perdidas e incluso realizar curaciones fuera del círculo. Yuwipi es famoso por su levitación y otros fenómenos inexplicables. Esta experiencia dura unas pocas horas y siempre tiene lugar después del anochecer. El evento es seguido por una comida y otra casa de sudor opcional a la mañana siguiente.

Mire aquí para escuchar canciones Yuwipi !

PETA WAKAN

Painted Buffalo Skull

 

 

 

 

The Sun Dance

The Sun Dance is an annual summertime dance that involves dancing around a sacrificial Cottonwood tree.  The participants perform a short sweat lodge in the mornings and evenings.  Dancers enter the dance arbor at dawn, they dance throughout the day in intervals until evening.  This continues for a total of four days without food and water (details and doctrines may vary).

The Sun Dance is sponsored by an individual although each dancer participates for some selfless reason.  For the healing of someone, to support a good cause, or for the life of a friend or relative.  Dancers pledge to dance annually for four years. Sometimes, during some versions of the dance, piercing of the skin may be involved. Piercing is not required and may vary with individual preference ( according to ones’ own vision ).

After finishing the four year commitment dancers preform a give away. The Give Away is a showering of gifts by a grateful person upon the rest of the community and everyone else present.  This is done to say thank you to the spirits as well as the people.

The Sun Dance rite is thousands years old and empowers the people by allowing dancers to give of them selves for the Earth, for others as well as for other selfless reasons. Some elements of the dance have been added recently like the pulling of Buffalo skulls. This was originally done for the atonement of something and was not necessarily part of the dance. that is why it is done outside of the dance arbor away from the the Sun Dance tree. The involvement of the Heyoka, or sacred clown is said to be a recent addition to the dance as well. Long ago women did not dance unless a dancer they supported died before finishing their commitment. There came a time when most of the dancers died and women had to dance to continue the tradition, they have participated ever since.

Like many other details in the spiritual world the fact that they are moving and growing is ample evidence of its’ own sentience and life!  The Sun Dance , as a living entity, works well above the human sphere. At its, center is the sun, next is the tree that gave its life. Then there is the Intercessor, medicine man, the woman representing the White Buffalo Calf Maiden and all the dancers. then just as important are the supporters. All of them are guided by the power of the sun in this dance that has its’ own will and volition regardless of anything else.

In the old days, a band of people would sponsor their spiritual leader or any one capable of accomplishing the dance, and have that person dance to help them, to sacrifice for them to improve their survival and well being. There was one Lakota Sun Dance yearly immediately following the main tribal council representing the entire tribe. One can clearly see by this, that dancing was not done to prove ones self or to gain spiritual advancement. The Sun Dance should be done by those who are responsible for other peoples’spirituality (by spiritual leaders). One should only dance for some selfless reason and never for your own gain. it is true that by doing the Sun Dance one gains a spiritual connection, but this is only the case for those who do so selflessly. Spiritual gifts then, are more of a by-product of dancing than the motive for it.

The sun Dance has grown unbelievably across the Americas and is practiced abroad by Representative’s of 53 different countries. Despite controversy, the Sun Dance has become an international spiritual path and will continue to flourish with the sun’s help.

The Native American tribes who originally practiced this dance were: The Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine  Cheyenne, Crow, Gros, Ventre, Hidatsa  Sioux, Plains Cree, Plains Ojibway, Sarasi, Omaha, Ponca, Ute, Shoshone, Kiowa, and Blackfoot tribes. Their rituals varied from tribe to tribe. Today, the Sun Dance has survived colonization through it’s secretive practice, despite being illegal until recently.

The importance here is to remember that there is no right or wrong way to pray as long as you respect the teaching of the elders who brought it to the people. Do this by keeping it sacred, not blending it with foreign concepts, and understanding its’ history! The Sun Dance was given to the Lakota people by the White Buffalo Calf Maiden along with the Seven Sacred Rites hundreds’ of years ago according to Lakota records painted on buffalo hides!

The Sun Dance itself, according to Archaeologists, may have started any where from about 4,000 to 14,000 years ago. Countless thousands of pipes have been unearthed from the Hopewell culture in the Ohio Valley, some of which represent woolly mammoth and manatee!

Saguache Pow-wow.

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Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal PowowSaguache Pow-wow.

Saturday August 29th 2015

The 2015 Pow-Wow will be Saturday August 29th and the potluck dinner will be Friday the 28th.  Labor Day fell late this year so the Pow-Wow had to be pushed back into August.

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Come learn, enjoy, and participate with the drums of Native American tribes sounding through the Town of Saguache.

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Click this link: Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Pow-wow

 

DETAILS

Downloadable Flyer: PowWowFlyer 2015

Saturday,

29 August 2015

Open to the Public

SaguachePowwow@gmail.com

Free Admission

Park Opens 9:00am

Grand Entry at 11:00 a.m.

Flag Song, Victory Song, Prayer

Otto Mears Park, Saguache

Sponsored by a generous grant from Saguache County Board of Commissioners.

Drums:

  ♥  Steve BlueHorse- Lakota

  ♥   Forest Lake Singers of Tuba City, AZ- Navajo

MC: Elvin Keeswood

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Friday 28 August 2015 at 6:00 pm is the Honor Meal for our Elders, public welcome, potluck (Pow-Wow committee provides main dish) at the Community Building at Otto Mears Park,

HWY 285, Saguache, CO

Call Crowfox 719-588-3390

or Ruth 719-580-5946

This Powwow began as a dream many years ago.  It was created to be a heritage learning experience by a Native American community member for her children.  Her dream was to keep Indigenous Heritage alive in the community while instilling pride in her children as they learned about regalia and dancing.  It has been twenty years since those Powwows.  Now this community member works on the current committee to continue that dream on a larger scale.This Pow-wow is unique in that it focuses on the noncompetitive origins of this tradition. This is one of the more spiritual Pow-wows around.

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Click here to listen to Saguache County Powwow music

Saguache Pow-Wow has a very successful Facebook page.  If anyone would like to share your Pow-Wow pictures, memories, or information please feel free to post them there.

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Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Powow

As always, Saguache Pow-Wow needs volunteers.  Thank you to everyone who has volunteered in the past.  Thank you to everyone who has donated for the Pow-Wow Giveaways, a very important tradition.

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We look forward to seeing everyone there!

PETA WAKAN   Contact:    PETA WAKAN
Phone:  Crowfox Fleming 719-588-3390

or Ruth Horn 719-580-5946
Email: saguachepowwow@gmail.com

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About Sweat lodge songs


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About Sweat lodge songs

Most Lakota sweat lodges are very similar, Most have four rounds and the same basic format. whether the rocks are all brought in at once or what ever, you first set the stage and then you call in the spirits, Just like any thing else. Some Lodges the first round is in preparation for the invocation, in others it all happens first round right off the bat. Next you address the spirits, you pray, ask them some thing or just say hello. Then comes the doctoring or at least, the point where the spirits act, where they move about.

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First you call your friends over, then you ask them advice or just talk, then you entertain them and they respond, they can give you advice. Just like having guests over, you’ll probably have to feed them and even get them back home. So it is in the world of invoking spirits, not much different than inviting embodied guests over! The songs follow a logical sequence. my aim in saying all this is not to teach those who want to run Sweat Lodge’s without traditional initiation. Singers are rare though, so I would like to invite you all to learn Lakota Sweat Lodge Songs here! Most Sweat Lodges performed all over are Lakota in origin. Some were passed without proper instructions. Others may have been copied without formal initiation and they should seek a teacher. Pouring water for a sweat lodge without  knowing an invitational song is like trying to drive a car without gas, still  a lot of people seem content doing this. Furthermore, pouring water for a sweat lodge without singing a closing song is like trying to steal a car without gas, It may have serious implications.

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Some individuals fail to appreciate the powers that these traditional songs conjure up. Perhaps they had their eyes closed during the lodge! In this modern world it can be difficult for the domesticated mindset to grasp the concept of invocation, this is understandable.

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All too often the lack of songs in a Sweat Lodge can be attributed to the simple fact that the leader just can’t sing. If that is the case you must find a singer, just like the olden days, you find singers to call the spirits. Learning songs is is not only therapeutic, it can give you the key to the doorway of another dimension. Song has always been the invocation  key in every culture of human kind. One need not take our word for it though, find out for yourselves!

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Knowing the Correct sequence of the sweat lodge songs can dramatically transform everyone present. Some people learn the basics and maybe a song or two.Then they Are transformed into experts almost overnight! Like they say, The one eyed man is king in the valley of the blind. What ever the case may be, it is important to understand that it is essential to formally have received an altar fom a true tradition. Know that these traditions (denominations) do things differently.

It is the singer that is entrusted with the power, the humble voice in the background. So remember, First open the door with a directional song, then, while the door is open, sing individual calling songs. Next round pray and sing prayer songs. Then they dance and heal with dancing and healing songs. Then thank them, make offerings (give gifts) and send them home! This is the same with any ritual anywhere!

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To correctly perform a Sweat Lodge one needs to undergo Hanbleceya (Vision Quest). Herein lies the secret to spirit helpers, the origin of songs as well as the connection to specific ancient lineages. Learn the songs from our song posts, keep in mind the sequence, some song sets we have listed are in order.

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Click this link to Hear and Learn sweat lodge songs!

Check out our site for more songs or come and learn directly from us most every Saturday from 3-5 pm. Crestone Colorado. Contact us for details and availability!

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Hanbleceya, crying for a vision.

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HANBLECEYA

The Vision Quest Ceremony is a way of communicating with the Great Spirit. There are many misconceptions about this fascinating rite. One misconception is that a vision is obtained by reaching a delirious state of exhaustion through fasting. This is untrue, visions are obtained because specific Spirits are called and sent to the person requesting a vision.

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The magic of the ritual is dependent on many things. Mostly they depend upon an ancient lineage of Spirit Helpers that have been handed down within the tradition. Also a very important factor is that people pray in support from a distance. The supporters maintain a specially prepared sacred fire without letting it go out. Another important part of the vision quest are the prayer ties. Participant tie 405 tiny bundles of tobacco to a single string. This string will encircle the quester forming the Hocoka or center. This is done so that only certain spirits can enter. The tobacco each contain a prayer, the spirits then read each prayer as they arrive.

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The vision quest is known as a hanbleceya, or “to cry for a vision”. Like many ceremonies it begins with a sweat lodge. Within the sweat lodge the person questing is handed a sacred canupa (sacred pipe). The quester is covered with a star quilt and led to a specific secluded place. The medicine man or woman prays and sings calling the spirits. The quester is left alone to pray all the while holding faithfully the sacred canupa and not letting it go.

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When this ceremony is properly performed the person praying for a vision should not experience undue thirst or hunger. Also they will experience a communion with the Divine. Depending on the circumstance, that may include teleportation, a soul journey, a visitation, or a simple message.

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Experiencing a vision quest is a very fulfilling event. It is an initiatory rite of passage as well as a way of gaining answers from the Great Spirit. One may gain a connection with an ancestral guide or an animal spirit helper. Many misconceptions what is popularly known as a totem animal. One’s totem animal for instance may be a man or a tree but even this is misleading. A totem is a spiritual friend or power known as sicun. A bear totem for example may be the soul of a bear or the part of the Great Spirit (God) after which all bears were modeled.

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A vision quest is usually a 24 hour experience. In our Lakota tradition the quest can last up to 4 days (and 3 nights). The amount of time depends upon the purpose of the ceremony and the individual. One does not necessarily have a more profound experience by questing for a long time. It is a magical rite depending upon the Spirits intervention and the prayers involved. The songs, the medicine man or woman, the supporters, the fire, the canupa, the tobacco prayer ties, the offerings, and the sweat lodge all work together to create a doorway for the person vision questing.

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This ritual ends the way it began. The person is ceremoniously brought back to the sweat lodge where the accounts of the experience are shared and interpreted. The sacred canupa is lighted and finally smoked. Water and sometimes corn, meat, and fruit are shared to break the fast as well as to bless and strengthen everyone in a sacred way. after blessing oneself with the sacred pipe (canupa) and drinking water the ceremony comes to a close. The purpose of a vision quest is to commune with the divine. Vision Quest is a prerequisite of the Sundance and the annual obligation of the medicine man\woman.

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To experience a Vision Quest with us first support at our Vision Quest camp. Check our events calendar. We usually hold  Vision Quest in late Spring and then again in early Fall.

 

Vision Quest Preparations
 

To do the vision quest one would need to make the tobacco prayer ties. The 405 prayer ties are offerings for the 405 spirits of the Earth (Wasicun pi). The spirits that come will inspect each one ( they may not all come ).  The ties are also a protective device, in that only the 405 spirit may enter. Usually we use just basic cotton fabric. Normally the 405 ties are red but colors can vary depending on the situation. Be sure and contact us about this important detail. The fabric is cut into 2 inch squares.

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The string to use may be yarn, kite string, or sinew (waxed nylon). A tiny pinch of tobacco is placed into a cloth square, using two slip knots, the bundle is tied without cutting the string. Keep the prayer ties an inch apart. You should only be praying while you do this, nothing else. It is nice to smudge the prayer ties each time you sit down to work on them. The ties should be rolled onto a small wad of sage as you go along, sort of like rolling a ball of yarn. They can be made in stages or all at once. Be sure the string will be long enough, pieces of string cannot be tied together. So make sure you wind up with one continuous line of 405 prayer ties 1 inch apart.

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You will also need to make prayer flags, also known as robes. You will need 1/4 yard of red, yellow, black, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, and lavender. These should be new basic cotton. Also you will need 1/4 yard of red felt of any kind. A small hand full of tobacco is placed into the corner of the fabric and tied into a bundle with string. Each flag will be separate but make sure you leave about 7 inches of string  on either side of the bundle to tie these to sticks later.

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 Just before vision quest we will take a short hike to gather fresh sage and five forked sticks either chokecherry or juniper. The prayer flags will be tied to these just before the sweat lodge. The sage will be laid out upon the ground within the Hocoka.

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For the red felt prayer flag (waluta) you will also need a shell button, a medicine wheel disc decorated with porcupine quills, and a special feather. These will be tied to the bundle in that order. Please contact us if you cannot find some of these supplies.blog artwork 076

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A metal bucket with a dipper and a plain knife will be needed. An extra quarter yard of red basic cotton fabric will be used to wrap all of these things with sage. All of the items used in the vision quest must be new and unused. You will need a new star quilt or a Pendleton blanket or a buffalo hide. Everything that has been mentioned so far will be given away afterwards, except the sage, which can be used throughout the year as smudge incense. An extra blanket should be brought. This can be a used blanket of any kind that you will not give away.

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The most important item for the vision quest is the sacred canupa or sacred pipe. Those people who carry a canupa will use their own. We will provide a pipe (on loan) to those who do not have one. Like the bucket, dipper, and knife, their handles will be wrapped in sage with the extra red fabric.

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During the Vision Quest, if you need to use the “bathroom” you will place your sweetgrass braid over the prayer tie string. You will step over the braid outside of the hocoka use the “bathroom” and step back over the sweetgrass braid into the hocoka and remove the sweetgrass braid from the prayer tie string. To avoid all this one should fast from solid foods one or two days before going up on the hill.

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 In the event of the menses unexpectedly occurring while questing, a woman then is led away from the sequestered area and will be taken to the Moon Lodge. The ceremony ends for her then and can resume at a later date.( We will know if  the Moontime begins ).

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Appropriate attire for this event for men is a pair of shorts or underwear. Ladies wear a simple cotton dress. We have sweat dresses and all of the necessary ceremonial equipment available.

Anyone participating in the vision quest would be responsible for providing a feast for all of the supporters. In some cases one would give gifts to all of the supporters as well. Contact us for more details in regards to this. Some of the foods for this are specific and would have to be prepared during the Ceremony. A few groceries to feed some of the supporters are necessary as well (they will participate in a light fast).

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Vision Quest Supporters

Click here to read Vision Quest Supporter Details

If you would like to be a supporter for the vision quest we would need help tending the fire and in the kitchen. The fire is attended to constantly so we would have to do it in shifts. We will be singing songs and praying. Supporters would be involved in the sweat lodges and in the actual bringing the quest-er to and from the Hocoka. Women are to wear skirts or dresses while on the premise. If a woman happens to have her moon time (menses) then we have a Moon Lodge for her to offer prayers from that space. This insures that her energy does not conflict with the Ceremony.

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Supporting for a ceremony like this can be very empowering and profound. It is an opportunity to learn more about these ways. If you want to support someone who is doing the vision quest and you are unable to attend, you can do so at home. Some find it helpful to keep a candle lit to remember that people are out there and to connect with the sweat lodge fire. Food and water may be put out for the spirits as well as fasting yourself. Supporting a Hanbleceya is not complete without singing!!!

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Singing during vision Quest is very important. The gift of song, like all animals , is what we have been given to call out to the powers of the universe in a time of need! Naturally one would not want to sing closing songs . There are a whole variety of songs you would not want to sing which is just common sense. Each person has particular affiliations and powers that guide them, so in your heart you know what you need to call in. 

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Any songs appropriate to you is good. keep in mind you have a limited time to receive a message so don’t waste you time singing “Jack and Jill went up the hill”. So many people decide to do a vision quest and wind up twiddling their thumbs, pining away the hours waiting for it to be over. Hanbleceya is not the time and place to be daydreaming of food and talking to your self in the same endless chatter that occupies your daily life. It is a time to stand and address the Sky, Earth, Moon, Stars and all the rest of nature. As it says in a prominent Hanbleceya song, “With difficulty I am standing”.

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Know that most all Spiritual Lakota songs have come through a vision or dream, mostly from Hanbleceya. Everyone has a song, a prayer, and a message to receive from the spirits. a song from the spirits is a gift of power. Do not take it lightly when you hear a song during vision quest or even an ordinary dream. Songs are doorways, corridors for the spiritual forces to use to help you. Do not idly sing them in the shower. it is said that some of the spirits may have to travel long distances and may take extreme risks to find you. Be sure you are not calling things unnecessarily. When on Vision Quest, SING!

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Yuwipi/Lowanpi

Yuwipi\Lowanpi

        We believe in the night sing, the power of inyan, the stone, the miraculous healing power of the ancestors and the sacred songs.  We believe in the Wiwila, little people, animal spirits, and the various other Tunkasila (spirits). We believe in the emptiness of the Medicine Man as a hollow bone for the spirits’ work.

The Night Sing, or Lowanpi, is probably the most fascinating rite in the western hemisphere. Anthropologists believe that it has its origins in Siberia and that it spread from there to many places throughout the world. It is believed to have been practiced in Nepal and northern China thousands of years ago.  There are ancient traces of it among the Laplanders’, The Mongols, The Icelandic peoples’ and in Amazonia.

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In the 1950′s it is said to have died out in Siberia but it has made a recent come back from North America. Versions of the Yuwipi/Lowanpi have long been practiced by tribes of the Northern and Eastern United states. The Tent Shaking rite among the Ojibwa were well documented in the 1800s, as well as the various plains tribes.                      

When the Medicine Man is tied and bound it is known as a Yuwipi rather than Lowanpi. It is this act of tying, untying, the frame drum, as well as the general events of the ceremony are what allowed Anthropologists to trace the yuwipi to Siberia and beyond. The Canli Pahta, or prayer ties are a purely Lakota element in this beautiful practice.

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Recently, people say things like “these ceremonies came about when our people had to hide their spiritual practices”. These views are inconsistent with Anthropological and Archaeological facts as the Yuwipi is thought of as the Neanderthal’s primary religion. There is no question that the Yuwipi/Lowanpi was never one of the Seven Sacred Rites of the White Buffalo Calf Woman. This suggests that the Prayer Ties and the use of the Sacred Pipe were, at some point, added to the Yuwipi. Similarly  songs as well as other elements have come from the Yuwipi/Lowanpi and entered into the Sundance.

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 These ways may have come from Siberia ,but the reverse may be the case just as well, especially in the case with mastodon hunters who followed the herds. It is believed that the yuwipi, the ceremony that truly defines Shamanism, moved with the migration of the mastodon. The Lakota primarily hunted Mastodon before the buffalo, as did various other tribes.

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The healing that occurs in these ceremonies  may not be accompanied by any tactile sensations. This does not affect the power of the healing.  The most difficult manifestation seems to be for the spirits to make sound. Auditory experiences seem to occur less (the singing or speaking of spirits) than tactile ones. There are no real generalizations though, it is up to the Spirits alone, next it is up to the Medicine Man’s relationship with those beings and last but not least the faith of the participants. It is strange to see the (new-age) shamanic drumming sessions that are so popular now. This practice is directly mimicking the ancient ways without any of the outward manifestations (or initiation  that are usual to these ceremonies. It is Interesting to note that certain individuals are born with, or acquire the ability to create situations characteristic to Yuwipi.

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Daniel Dunglas Home and Carlos Mirabelli are two individuals known to have brought about such situations. first thing one could experience in a Yuwipi or Lowanpi is levitation and movement the rattles and various other objects. Next would be flickering lights, rain, hail, wind and other similar sensations. The third type of manifestation one could expect is the touch of a spirit’s hand, the touch of an animal, Little person, or other such being’s touch.

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The Yuwipi ritual may be held for very specific purposes.  Among them are healings, finding lost or stolen objects, and finding solutions to problems.   It is part of a trinity of rights, Yuwipi, Sweat lodge and Vision Quest.  After performing a sweat lodge the right begins in a room in which all lights can be extinguished.  The leader or Yuwipi man is bound within a quilt and laid face down in the center of the room, (Yuwipi means they tie him up).  The room is plunged into total darkness as the lead singer begins to drum and sing with great enthusiasm.  In the darkness the spirits play the rattles and untie the leader.  The lights are turned on and the Yuwipi man narrates the events of the ceremony and the sacred Canupa is passed round.  This all takes about four to six hours and is an evening event.  Yuwipi is followed by a  potluck. The Yuwipi is an important Ceremonial that we are excited to have in our community as well as visitors from all over.

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Singing for Yuwipi / Lowanpi is a very serious matter. The lead singer and the accompaniment should not take it lightly. It is of utmost importance for the singer to be able to sense the man in the middle within the cover of total darkness as well as the coming and going of the various spirits that may be present. To get started the sacred Canupa will be filled with Cancasa with the accompaniment of the Pipe filling song or Opagipi Olowan. Sometimes two other pipe songs may be sung with it. Then for the tying this song can be sung although it is not necessary.

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It is important that this all happens swiftly and without delay (tying). As soon as the man is in the center face down the lights are extinguished and the directional song (Tatetopakiya Olowan) is sung. There are some very important things to know about this song. This song is received by the medicine man during vision quest and is his personal song. It is sometimes known as an altar song or as Wicakicopi Olowan (they call them song). This type of song can only be learned in person Unless a regular directional song is being used. A good example of this would be the directional song of the sweat lodge. Other spirits are called in now with the calling songs, the Deer, Mole, Bat and stone spirits’ (Yuwipi Wasicunwould take precedence for us. The calling songs can vary greatly with circumstance and the Yuwipi Bundle itself.

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A prayer song is sung signaling the time of prayer. This can happen in a number of ways depending on the situation. Basically this is when the spirits are asked for healing or the whereabouts of someone or something. The spirits may go look to check something out or retrieve an object or Ghost.  Healing songs would now be sung as the spirits get to work on the sponsor and whomever stands to receive a healing. This usually happens either by the sponsor, select individuals or by everyone.

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The spirits’ may perform tasks in answer of the prayers during the healing round but may continue working into the next set of songs. Depending on the medicine man a wide variety of songs can be sung at this point. Now it is common to hear Kettle songs, Ceh’ohomni Olowan. These are better known as Heyoka songs or Thunder being songs.

 These clown songs originally are used as part of the Kettle Dance and other Heyoka rites. It is said that the ghosts of the Heyoka Medicine men intervene in the Yuwipi /Lowanpi cerimony to affect a cure, who really knows? These songs may be sung solely to call the Thunder beings as well as other related spirits. Many other songs can be sung, there are the stone songs, spider songs, and all the various animal songs.

The spirits Do the untying with the untying song. This song is known as Wicayujujupi Olowan. Now Spirit dancing songs are sung. This songs known as Waci Olowan are sung in the sweat Lodge as well as the Sun Dance. In the lodge it is used in the most active time for the spirits which is the third door. During Sundance it is sung while the pierced dancers are breaking free or just after that. During Yuwipi this is at the point of untying. Sometimes in a ceremony such as this a version is used calling the stone spirits to dance, it is up to the Yuwipi man. At this point regular Sweat and Sundance songs may be sung for the spirits pleasure, for them to dance.

No matter how the ceremony progresses or how it is preformed or whatever, the Spirits go home song and the closing song are always song. Sometimes a few songs are sung just before this.

28. Closing Song           ( spirits go home song ).                  This is a must know song! For most every ceremony whether its’ for a simple Sweat Lodge or to end a Sun Dance!!!

Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Tunkasila ta wokonze ca, Lena cicu welo. Hot aninyan kin najin pelo.

English

As we leave our voices are heard, As we leave our voices are heard, It is Grandfather’s will, That I give you these offerings. As we leave our voices are heard.

Espanol

Mientras partimos, nuestra voces se eswchan, Mientras partimos,nuestra voces se eswchan, Es la voluntad de el Abuelo, Que te doy estas ofrendas, Mientras partimos, nuestra voces se eswchan, 

 29. Ending Song

Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo, Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

Anpetu okihica cicu welo, Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

English

My friend, I have given you these. Behold them, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

The day has made it possible to give you these offerings, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

Espanol

Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo.

El dia ha echo posible poder darte estas ofrendas, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo.

Black Bear

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Inipi Wakan

 

Inipi Wakan

Said to be the oldest rite, the Sweat Lodge Ceremony is one of purification. Individuals crawl to the left (ladies first) and clockwise to their spots. Hot lava rocks are heated outside of the lodge on a fire. They are then carried into a cloth covered willow frame hut to be placed into a pit. After the door is shut the inside of the lodge is pitch black with the exception of the red stones which we often refer to as the Grandmothers and Grandfathers.  Herbs such as cedar and sweet grass are then placed on the stones to assist in the healing of the Ceremony. Hot steam envelopes the lodge as the leader pours water upon the glowing stones. The loud drum throbs steadily as the singers join in with the appropriate songs. Participants are encouraged to connect in their own prayer to Great Spirit (God) while focusing on what is needing attention at that particular time. When the time is right someone calls out, Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! or All of My Relations! The flap is then opened. We do this for 4 doors and then exit the lodge to enjoy a feast together.

Fire          Sweat Lodge Preparatory Details                                                                                                     

The Singing Stone would like to warmly invite you back to the womb of the mother in our traditional Inipi or sacred sweat lodge ceremony.

Arriving 1/2 hour to 1 hour prior to the stated time for each inipi is suggested. By arriving early individuals become better acquainted and allows them time to make prayer ties. These ties are used in to project intentions (make prayers) before hand. Details like this may vary according to the situation or the intercessor. Lodges may last anywhere from 1 to 3 hours. Please bring a towel and a change of clothing if necessary. Women typically wear a long dress that covers the shoulders or a skirt and t-shirt. Men usually wear swim trunks. We would ask that women having their sacred menses or moon time to stay out of the lodge in order to maintain the energy in a flowing manner. Ladies are welcome to stay in the house if they like. Please leave your pets at home and do not attend our Ceremonies intoxicated. We are happy to offer a clean, drug free environment.

In our lineage it is tradition to offer tobacco to the person pouring water so we require everyone to bring this offering. We do not place a fee on Ceremonies. However, donations are what helps us to continue offering Native Teachings. We can always use donations of firewood, flat cedar leaf, sweetgrass, prayer tie material, and blankets. Monetary donations are the most needed. We look forward to joining in prayer to share with one another.  

Sagte zu den ältesten Ritus sein, ist die Sweat Lodge Zeremonie eine Reinigung. Personen auf der linken Seite (Ladies first) kriechen und im Uhrzeigersinn um ihre Plätze. Hot Lava Felsen außerhalb der Lodge auf einem Feuer erhitzt. Sie werden dann in einem Tuch bedeckt Weide Rahmen Hütte in einer Grube angeordnet werden durchgeführt. Nachdem die Tür geschlossen ist das Innere der Hütte ist pechschwarz mit Ausnahme der roten Steine​​, die wir oft als die Großmütter und Großväter. Kräuter wie Zeder und sweetgrass werden dann auf die Steine ​​gelegt, um bei der Heilung von der Zeremonie zu unterstützen. Heißer Dampf Umschläge die Lodge als Marktführer gießt Wasser auf die glühenden Steine. Das laute Trommel pocht stetig die Sänger kommen in mit den entsprechenden Liedern. Die Teilnehmer werden ermutigt, in ihrem eigenen Gebet zu Great Spirit (Gott) zu verbinden, während die Konzentration auf das, was die Aufmerksamkeit benötigen zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt. Wenn die Zeit reif ist jemand ruft, Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! oder Alle meine Beziehungen! Die Klappe wird dann geöffnet. Wir tun dies für 4 Türen und beenden Sie dann die Hütte ein Fest zusammen zu genießen.

Se dice que es el rito más antiguo, la ceremonia de temascal es una de purificación. Las personas que se arrastran hacia la izquierda (las damas primero) y en sentido horario para sus spots. Piedras de lava calientes se calientan exterior de la casa de campo en un incendio. A continuación, se realizan en un paño cubierto choza marco de sauce para ser colocado en un pozo. Cuando la puerta se cerró el interior de la casa de campo es completamente negro, con la excepción de las piedras de color rojo, que a menudo nos referimos como las abuelas y abuelos. Hierbas como el cedro y la hierba dulce se colocan sobre las piedras para ayudar en la curación de la ceremonia. Sobres de vapor caliente de la casa de campo como el líder vierte agua sobre las piedras ardientes. El tambor fuerte palpita constantemente a medida que los cantantes se unen con las canciones adecuadas. Se anima a los participantes a conectarse en su propia oración a Gran Espíritu (Dios), mientras que se centra en lo que está necesitando la atención en ese momento. Cuando llegue el momento que alguien dice en voz alta, Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! o Todos mis parientes! La aleta se abre. Esto lo hacemos por 4 puertas y salga del lodge para disfrutar de una fiesta juntos.

说是最古老的仪式,汗屋仪式是一个净化。个人抓取到左边(女士优先),顺时针方向点。热熔岩被加热以外的小屋火灾。覆盖布柳帧小屋被放入一个坑,然后将它们带入。门被关闭后的小屋内漆黑除红色的石头,我们经常提及的祖母和祖父。如雪松和香草的草药,然后放置在石头上,以协助愈合仪式。热蒸汽信封小屋作为领导者盆满钵满水后,发光的石头。大声鼓跳动稳步歌手加入合适的歌曲。鼓励与会者在自己的祈祷伟大的精神(上帝)连接,同时注重对什么是需要注意在特定的时间。当时间是正确的有人打电话,阿霍Mitakuye Oyasin!或我的关系!皮瓣,然后打开。我们这样做是为4门,然后退出小屋,一起享受一场盛宴。

最古の儀式であると言われ、スウェットロッジセレモニーは、精製の一つである。個人は左(女性初)にクロールし、そのスポットに時計回り。熱い溶岩が火ロッジの外で加熱される。彼らはその後、ピットに配置する布カバー柳フレーム小屋に運ばれます。ドアがシャットダウンされた後はロッジの中は、私たちはしばしば祖母と祖父と呼ぶ赤い石を除いて真っ黒です。このような杉やスウィートグラスなどのハーブは、その後、セレモニーの治癒を支援するために石の上に配置されます。熱い蒸気の封筒リーダーとしてロッジは輝く石上に水を注ぐ。歌手は適切な曲をで参加として大声でドラムは着実フロン。参加者は、その特定の時間に注意を必要とされているものに焦点を当てながら、グレートスピリットに自分の祈り(神)に接続することをお勧めします。時間があるときに右の誰かがAho Mitakuye Oyasin、外に呼び出し!または私の関係のすべて!フラップは、その後開かれた。私たちは、4ドアのためにこれを行うと、その後一緒にごちそうを楽しむことがロッジを終了します。

Native American Church

 

State of Colorado Seal

All Night Prayer Vigils  

 ” We believe in the sacred fire, the holy water, the moon altar and their blessings.  We believe in the sacred healing power of the plant nations and that our prayers are heard and attended to.  We believe that we will be judged, held accountable for our actions in the afterlife and in the forgiveness of sins”. 

In bloom

Peyote Cactus In bloom

If you plan to attend a Peyote ceremony click this link to read about the details or read this article!

NEW link: The New York Times: Military Ends Conflict Of Career and Religion. By JAMES BROOKE

To find out about becoming a member of The Native American Church: MEMBERSHIP

From earliest recorded time, Peyote has been used by indigenous peoples. It is said to have been divinely discovered by a woman who was lost from her people. Being pregnant and having gone without water for four days, she was facing death. Hearing the voice of the medicine and its instructions, she gave birth, found her people and Taught them the songs and the Ceremony. This is why the Huichol peoples traditionally have a woman preside over the peyote ceremony.

Two main denominations formed from this rite. One is as it is practiced by the Huichol and their related tribes. The other was practiced by the Aztecs and the Anasazi.The modern form of the Peyote ceremony comes from several Tribes namely the Lipan Apache. About 2000 years ago the Apache took over the kokopelli trail, taking on the Anasazi ceremonials, and later sharing them with Other tribes.

This ancient statue is The Aztec Medicine Goddess. She Is poised in the usual Peyote fashion. This statue used to hold a staff and Gourd rattle.

This ancient statue is The Aztec Medicine God. He Is poised in the usual Peyote fashion. This statue used to hold a staff and Gourd rattle.

 Many North American tribes retained the use of peyote since ancient times and is still used by The Hopi, Navajo and other South West tribes following their Night Chants,         (according to anthropologists in the 1920s). Dried Peyote has been found by Archiologists as well as Native Americans in Chaco canyon and Mesa Verde. Some of the findings were estimated at 5000 years old. One variety found in a cave in Texas was from as far away as the Yucatan. According to the Spanish conquistadors, the medicine grew as far north as Santa Fe New Mexico in 1600. Many petroglyphs depicting the medicine are belived to be 14.000 years old.

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The Native American Church spread like wildfire during a horrible era in American history, which reached a peak during the industrial revolution. By 1874, the Kiowa and Comanche were confined to reservations and denied their natural way of life. Reservation life brought tremendous hardship to all Native Americans. The Native American Church provided hope for the people, allowing them to learn and adapt to the swiftly changing times. Peyote meetings have become the most popular Native American spiritual practice today, meetings are inter-tribal and have evolved into an international religion.

In the 1890s, James Mooney, an anthropologist from the Smithsonian Institution, attended Peyote meetings among the Kiowa and the Tarahumara. Finally, in 1918, after testifying in favor of American Indians at Congressional hearings, Mooney advised various tribes to obtain a legal charter to protect their religious freedom. With Mooney’s help, the Native American Church was officially incorporated in 1918. Today it is the most widespread indigenous religion among Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

 Quanah Parker (Left), John Wilson (right).

 Quanah Parker (Left), John Wilson (right).

 Quanah Parker, son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, who had been found by Comanches at the age of nine, becoming then, part of the tribe. Quanah Parker became Chief and from his grandfather inherited his life as a successful rancher and also became an influential statesman. He received the “half-moon” style of the peyote ceremony from the Lipan Apache leader Chiwat. The half moon altar honors the Divine feminine.

John Wilson was half Delaware, quarter French, and quarter Caddo and was one of the most powerful Ghost Dance leaders. The Caddo, like the Tarahumara, have always had the Peyote Ceremony, but as John was both a visionary and a Christian (his father was a minister) he formed what is known as the Big Moon or Straight fire form of Tipi meeting that incorporated Jesus Christ’s teachings. The “cross fire” ceremony came about among the Kiowa yet was influenced by Wilson, who traveled extensively around the same time as Parker during the early days of the Native American Church movement.

Peyote cactus1

Click here to go to our Peyote Songs page!

Congressional Seal

For most chapters of the Native American Church, the Peyote ritual begins at sundown and continues through the night. The ritual includes prayer, the eating of Peyote, Peyote songs, water rituals, and contemplation. It ends with breakfast in the morning. The peyote ritual aids in the communion with sacred spirits, and gives power, authority, guidance, and healing. The healing may be emotional, physical or spiritual.

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 Traditionally it is known to be good for the heart as well as the eyes, while in today’s modern world it is used as an antibiotic and as a psychiatric medication. Peyote also helps with alcoholism and in the treatment of addictions.

Peyote use has been wrongfully associated with narcotics because it was used in the manufacture of mescaline in the 1960s’. It is not used in those kinds of concentrations within the native American Church and is considered by law as a ”non-drug use of peyote”.

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Click here to read: The Congressional Digest: a gem of historical reading!

 All Night Tipi Meeting

 This Ceremony takes place in a tipi around a sacred fire. Participants sing  and pray in a circle following the guidance of a Roadman or Roadwoman. Specific songs are sung accompanied by a water drum. There are four parts to this ritual just as there are in sweat lodge. These four stages are represented by the red hot coals which are raked out and formed into designs. Individuals are helped with just about anything one could need help with in their life. These meetings are also a celebration of life, We welcome all faiths and traditions to this life changing spiritual evening of prayer.PETA WAKAN

 

eagle and condor

eagle and condor

All Night Tipi Meeting Preparations

This is a time to appear as we would like to be seen by our Creator, Wakan Tanka, or God. Women, this is a nice time to wear a dress or a skirt and shawl. If it is your moon time please let us know and and we will make the proper arrangements. Bring an extra towel and change of clothing if needed for the sweat lodge in case we have one. Some people fast before the ritual but we do not advise this. Avoiding excessive salt the day of can help. If you are Alcoholic, clean out fully as the spirits of the medicine don’t like those kind of ”spirits”.  This ancient ritual will take place in a tipi so please be prepared for hot or cold conditions. Bring a flashlight, blankets,  and a potluck dish to pass for the Ceremonial feast to follow the Meeting.

 We do not allow pets, alcohol, or drugs on the premise. Before arriving it is also helpful to start thinking about what areas in your life are needing attention in order to project those prayers clearly.

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In our lineage, an unopened package of tobacco is traditionally offered to the Roadman. We could use help leading up to the Meeting and especially the day of. Please contact us to offer your service in the ways that are best suited. We do not charge for any Ceremonies. If an individual is in great need of help, they will not be turned away because they are unable to make a donation. Putting energy forth through donations of any sort is a balanced way to walk in this world. There are many ways that your donations help to make these Ceremonies flow and for that we are grateful. Medicine must be purchased for this type of Ceremony as well as firewood, Sacred foods, and many other things.


 Please make your tax deductible donation now 


Click here to read details.

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  •  If you bring your children to a ceremony please understand that Federal law prohibits minors from ingesting peyote.
  • If you suffer from Schizophrenia you can expect a safe episode free experience. Peyote does not interfere with medications associated with Schizophrenia either. 
  • Persons regularly using Alcohol and other narcotics will find their experience to be one of discomfort.
  • Federal employees (including military) are federally protected from discrimination as members.
  • If your conscience is burdened with guilt or regret, you may become aware of why you have those feelings.
  • Know too that Peyote is not a cure all, it is the sacrament in a prayer meeting in which we rely upon our prayers to enlist a healing.
  • Also a Native American Church meeting need not include the sacred sacrament of the herb Peyote!

membership card

Please donate to The Native American Church.

Click this link to learn about MEMBERSHIP!




  Click this link to read A.I.R.F.A.

Tipi of a singing rock

Inside roars Grandfather Fire

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