October 24, 25, 26 Building Project Work Party

October 24, 25,26 Building Project Work Party

Now is the time for us to fully enclose the steel building. We will be focusing on the roof this weekend. Any help would be greatly appreciated, so come and join us!

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As we enter into Autumn new possibilities are unfolding at The Singing Stone through the necessary steps of fundraising, accomplishing our non profit status, and physically creating our much needed building. Our ongoing venture which we invite you to attend will be our Work Party to get our roof completely on, we are hoping to complete by Sunday, October 19th.
This is an ongoing project but if we can beat the winter snow of late October, then we will be able to move ahead with insulating our structure and then working inside to create a livable space. If you are able to help out in any way then show up at our The Singing Stone Ceremonial Grounds at 10 a.m. any of these days.
 Lunches will be provided. Please bring your screw gun, drill, and work gloves. If anyone can assist with food and/or monetary donations and help with preparing lunches, please let us know. We appreciate any and all help!

October Building Project Work Party

October Building Project Work Party

Dear Friends,

 
The Singing Stone again would like to thank everyone for their recent efforts of monetary offerings, exceptional food preparations, as well as physical labor that was donated during our last Work Party as well as during Ceremonies. Everyone pulled together beautifully getting up those walls on our building over the summer and also during Vision Quest in September. A big WOPILA or THANK YOU to everyone! 
 
As we enter into Autumn new possibilities are unfolding at The Singing Stone through the necessary steps of fundraising, accomplishing our non profit status, and physically creating our much needed building. Our next venture which we invite you to attend will be our Work Party that will go from Monday, October 13th until we get our roof completely on (if there are enough helpers then we are hoping to complete by Sunday, October 19th). 
This is an ongoing project but if we can beat the winter snow of late October, then we will be able to move ahead with insulating our structure and then working inside to create a livable space. If you are able to help out in any way then show up at our The Singing Stone Ceremonial Grounds at 10 a.m. any of these days. Monday October 13th we will go until around 5 or 6 p.m. and we will see about the other days. Lunches will be provided. Please bring your screw gun, drill, and work gloves. If anyone can assist with food and/or monetary donations and help with preparing lunches, please let us know. We appreciate any and all help! 

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Along with our Work Party, we will be holding Vision Quest for Chris Long. There will be daily sweat lodges around 5 p.m. from the dates of Thursday, October 16th until Sunday, October 19th. As our Spring and Autumn Hanbleceyas were a group effort of pulling together through fire tending, meals, childcare, etc… this will be much the same. The fire will keep burning throughout this time and we will all need to support him as much as possible while working together to get The Singing Stone Building up. It will be a time to connect once again supporting each other towards our collective dream of spiritual community. 
 
Please remember to bring a tobacco offering for these sweat lodges. This is in keeping with our tradition and may be just a small amount for each lodge. One may be offered to our water pourer and one may also be offered to our fire tender. Women on your moon time (menses) we ask that you do not attend but you are welcome to join us for meals and support from a distance. Men typically wear swim trunks and women where a dress or skirt and top that covers your knees and shoulders. It is helpful to bring a towel, remove jewelry, and to show up early to make prayer ties or to help with preparations. Fires will be lit 2 hours prior to entering so feel free to show up around 3 p.m. any of these days. We ask that you bring a potuck dish or drink to share for after the lodges. Wood and any other donations are always welcomed. Please call or email with any questions. We hope to see you soon! Mitakuye Oyasin. 
 
We are in need of someone with experience in creating an LLC and Non Profit organization to give us some pointers. If you or anyone you know is interested in donating some of your knowledge, we greatly appreciate it! 

 
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SPIRITUAL ADVICE

SPIRITUAL ADVICE

PETA WAKAN

FOR THE SERIOUS SEEKER

1. Be connected. Understand that you have a direct connection to the divine and that you are ultimately responsible for your spiritual growth. The native path is about tapping into the connection you already have. Seek advice and learn from others, but know that you are the only one in charge of your own spirituality.

2. Be honest to yourself about your spirituality. Don’t believe anything you are told, especially about yourself. Question everything you think you know. The allure of fantasy is very potent because it make us feel special, Be humble and be simple. Take it all with a grain of salt, even the truth. Contemplate that the most valuable truth is wordless.

3. Have courage, Work hard, pray hard and be inspired. Dig deep within yourself and muster up every ounce of of volition that you can. Be excited, feel yourself being filled with charismatic enthusiasm, dauntless unwavering unbridled ferocity. Claw through your fine domestic vanier and unveil your true self, the untamed, unattached nature of your immortal spirit!

4. Ask for help, tell Wakan Tanka what you want. Tell all the spirits what you want and tell them to prepare you. Ask them to lead you to the right teachers, to just go ahead and give you the magic (if possible). Use your voice (which was given to you for this purpose), cry out into the heavens to receive what you need for spiritual empowerment.

5. Be a selfless servant with ruthless boundaries. Be humble and kind without being stupid or gullible. Practice kindness, gentleness, nonviolence, and be in harmony with nature. Do not judge or assume, be nice. Among other things, the spiritual path is a matter of attracting the right friends (spirits), you won’t be able to do this if you are erratic, violent and arrogant.

6. Make sacrifices, put out water for the spirits. Take the time and effort to spend good quality time pursuing your goal. Do Hanbleceya (vision quests) and other rites. Show the center of the universe how much you want it. Show them with your blood, sweat and tears, and do so with a prayer. Be practical with your offerings and never boast about what you have done!

7. Honour the children. Never allow your spiritual work to compromise children. Take care of the children first, for they are the most important thing on the spiritual journey.  Children and elderly are exempt of all ritual obligations. Never put god\goddess before your children! If you don’t have children, make sure that children benefit by what you do, they may become your future.

     lariat trail

There are many important ways we can progress on the spiritual path. first lets take a look at what that really means, to progress spiritually. One can rationally observe that every one is inherently spiritual, that we are spiritual beings having a physical experience here on earth. This leads to the age old question of why we are here. We are here to fulfill eternity, for Wakan Tanka to to be everything and experience infinity through everything. In the beginning was the void, and from that void of nothingness was an awareness. This awareness felt empty and soon it longed to aspire, to be somthing else. It strove to see itself in new ways, to grow.

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This, then, was the birth of inspiration, and reflects that spiritual urge to aspire and grow. This awareness then became the Creator by sacrificing part of itself. To make this story short, the Creator Sacrificed itself on and on, Transforming into water stone air and fire, and all that is. This process continues today, and as Wakan Tanka is infinite, one could say that God has already completed his task, and to some part of itself we are in the past. To another part of itself we are right here and now, from within every cell in our bodies and from every conceivable and inconceivable direction. All of everything is made of Wakan Tanka. So what is this spiritual urge? Why would we seek to come closer to what we could never escape? Everything is made from god and everything is god, and is independently divinely aware.

sining

The reason for our existence is to fulfil the creators destiny, we are all involved in this, every single thing that there is, is part of this amazing dance. To understand the spiritual path we need only to look to the old creation stories. Like the the Creator, we have this urge to grow and aspire, and we do. As human beings we grow and naturally reach out for more and more, until, as infants we can take the risk of standing on our own. There is the part about making a sacrifice, taking a risk to expand our view of the world. As we grow and learn physically we are also learning things that will serve us well after this life. In essence, the spiritual path is all about growth.

Saguache

Everything we learn here in this life are tools to serve us beyond this life. Avoiding danger, communicating, maneuvering, making friends and solving problems are all tools we will need in the afterlife. In all aboriginal spiritual traditions, we as human beings, eventually have to make the journey through the stars, across the milky way and beyond. It is a big universe out there and we’ll need all the experience we can get to be successful. Thats what we are learning, all of us are growing in a very practical way.

Powwow

What i am trying to say with all this is that by being spiritual and focusing upon spiritual matters, we are nourishing our souls. Indigenous rites like sweat lodge and hanbleceya (vision quest), for example, are tools designed to help us  fortify our souls. We are inspired, through nature, to sacrifice of our comfort zones and old ways of being, to grow and expand our horizons.

Waldorf

We all know, deep inside, the truth that there is one spirit, indivisible, that is eternal and inexhaustible. Our souls are the vehicles that carry that one light of the spirit. Reflected within every soul is that divine life force that fuels us and gives us life. When we say Mitaku Oyasin, we are saying my relatives, all of them. We are all directly connected to the source of all that there is, body, mind, soul and spirit. We are all related, not just in that we are all made out of god’s body. we are all fueled by and connected to the very center of the universe. In essence you could say that we are each other!

Amilio

What makes us individual then, is our soul, which houses our spirit. By building upon our souls’ structure, we fortify the spirits’ container. This allows us to expand and grow as a reflection of the very journey that Wakan Tankan took in the creation stories. We do this through spiritually nurturing activities. We do this through aspiring to grow, through self sacrifice, and change. From this clear viewpoint we can see that the spiritual path is truly a very practical journey. The spiritual path has little to do with ancestry and culture and has more to do with getting the job done.

lone dog

Keep in mind that not all so called “spiritual paths” are beneficial. Many newer traditions are still in the experimental stage. A two thousand year old tradition is still in the stages of working out the kinks and may not even endure. When you think about it, even an eight thousand year old tradition is really not that old. In light of all this it would make sense to learn everything you can about the most ancient spiritual traditions of the world and make use of all the tools available to you. Do so with the clarity that sees beyond cultural romanticism. Learn, and regardless of anything else BE spiritual!

mitaku oyasin!

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12 Lakota Virtues

A view from the arbor

12 Lakota Virtues

Essential to balance and happiness, there are 12 Lakota Virtues that were a part of everyday life for our Native American ancestors. These are lessons that were taught by storytellers who lived the lessons they imparted. They practiced what they preached. These virtues were and are the foundation of Lakota culture. The teaching is that our quality of life is not measured by material possessions but by how well our life’s journey flows and dances through these virtues. In Lakota “wicozani” is a word which describes wealth by living a happy well balanced life with physical and mental health in harmony with creation. We remember how our ancestors lived, remaining true to ourselves and to them by listening to the stories while being mindful of these important specific teachings.

Buffalo

These are the 12 Lakota Virtues:

1. Humility (Unsiiciyapi) – The first and most important step in life and especially on the spiritual path is humility which is the opposite of pride. In terms of spirituality, if the step of humility is skipped it results in delusions of grandeur. Humility is the foundation of all the other virtues. If you brag about your generosity then it spoils the generosity.

2. Perseverance (Wowacintanka) – In spite of difficulties we persist in our efforts which is a deeply empowering source of strength rising from within. To taste success we sometimes are forced to pick ourselves up and the gift is feeling how much life is worth living as we accomplish what we have set out to do. Many of our ancestors were faced with challenges that could only be helped through spiritual strength. This perseverance was what carried them through even to the afterlife.

3. Respect (Wawoohola) – A basic teaching among all tribes was that of respect towards all beings (sentient and insentient) which includes plants, animals, stones, wind, little people, and all of creation. In our present culture this important virtue has become lost with a general message of excess as well as intolerance for those who are challenged, elderly, or different in any way than ourselves. Our Lakota ancestors would ceremonially hunt their bison which would provide clothing, shelter, and food for the people. Every part was used and their spirit was honored by placing their skull facing east to meet the rising sun in unison with the rhythm of life.

4. Honor (Wayunonihan) – Being honorable means having strength of character by being a good person. Honor goes hand and hand with respect and many of the other virtues. To live the virtues it shows that someone has the integrity and dignity that makes up honor. Humility waters the roots of the tree of honor which then bears the fruit of love. By having honor means that one would choose the path of non violence and compassion rather than dishonorable actions.

5. Love (Cantognake) – More than just compassion, love is having the flame of emotion in one’s heart. Love rules over all things. The whole universe exists because of love, it is the motive of all creation.  It is not attachment because love can even be the incentive to be unattached. Love represents the balance that exists in everything. The warmth of the sun’s rays is the sun’s love for us. The ultimate love is spiritual joy which is responsible for life. Deep within each one of us and everything is this basic emotion known as Spirit.

6. Sacrifice (Icicupi) – Sacrifice is giving of oneself. The fruit of love is sacrifice. In the beginning the Creator sacrificed itself to make all that there is and through this humble act we can understand the significance of offering ourselves. In order to accomplish anything, one must be able to make a sacrifice. Whether it be the small sacrifices in your daily life or major sacrifices of your lifetime, we all reap what we sow by this fundamental act. We sacrifice our time and effort every day just to get things done but on a larger spiritual scale we can give of ourselves and give back to the Creator and Creation.

7. Truth (Wowicake) – Truth is being honest about yourself and the world around you. There is ultimate truth and then there are all of our individual truths. In this world of illusion we must rely upon our inner truth to know which way to go. Through gaining an understanding of life we learn to see beyond the illusions into what is real for us. We all have our own individual perspectives, it is relying upon our own perception within the greater reality that allows us to be in truth.

8. Compassion (Waunsilapi) – Doing what is right in caring for others as you would yourself is what makes a person compassionate. One need not feel sorry for or sympathetic to  anyone in order to live this virtue. In fact it is that inner strength that allows us to have the unconditional love that creates true compassion.

9. Bravery (Woohitike) – When an understanding of destiny and chance matures within the mind there is a dawning of faith within the heart. This is true courage. Bravery is born of the wisdom of life and death as well as one’s honor. It is not blind or reckless and can come from the very depths of our being in times of need. This open act of vulnerability despite circumstances can help us defy even the worst odds.

10. Fortitude (Cantewasake) – After learning patience and inner endurance one gains the strength necessary to have fortitude. Emotional stability, being alert, and having determination can help in having this persistent integrity. This is not an inflexible force. It is a quiet, gentle voice of a Grandmother with deep faith, trust, and understanding.

11. Generosity (Canteyuke) – “To have a heart” is the literal translation of this Lakota word which is a timeless virtue residing in the heart. True generosity has always been encouraged and exemplified in Lakota society while accumulating material possessions was greatly discouraged. As our Earth Mother gives everything, we should in turn do the same. True generosity embodies love and the understanding of impermanence.

12. Wisdom (Woksape) – Only after one has learned about life and is able to act on all the other virtues, can one be considered wise. First we attain knowledge then we learn to apply that knowledge. Wisdom is acting on what you know. Our gift to life is wisdom as well as life’s gift to us. It is knowing the difference between truth and the illusion. One can have knowledge without wisdom but one cannot have wisdom without knowledge. Wisdom is a reward from life for persevering through all of the virtues.

 

July 21 Work Party

July 21 Work Party

We would like to thank Karen Kenny for her generous donations in providing all the food for our work party, Thank you Karen!

We would also like to thank the all the wonderful helpers who came for our July 21 work party.

Alan Robbins from Crestone

Andre Seifert from Mexico

Barry Bailey from Crestone

Charlton Wilson from Loveland, CO

Justin Millard from Lodi, WI

Jeremy Sharpee from Lodi, WI

Lisa Bodey from Crestone

Nick Meisman from Crestone

David Vermont from Santa Cruz, CA

James MacDonald from Chile

Ramji from Crestone

Jill from Oklahoma

Thank you for helping to make a dream come true.

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July building project

July 16th Building Project

With the whole frame fully assembled, it’s time to put the siding into place.

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The work parties have been wonderful  there has been plenty of food. Thanks to generous donations every one has gotten enough to eat. Each afternoon the rain seems to bring us to a natural close and each evening we reconvene again for dinner.

 

July 2014 060                  Today the roof’s frame was fully assembled. We have started on the southern wall and should go up fairly quick. After the sides have been completed, then the roof panels will be installed. We are preparing for the doors and windows to be framed in, as well as the insolation.

we have organized a work party for the completion of our community building. Monday July 21. 9:00 AM

                          For information call us at 256-5307.

                   Food will be catered.

Work Party July 21July 7th building project

Our barn raising is going very well. As you can see from the pictures below, there has been a lot of progress on our building! We are at a point where we are going to need more workers to put up the siding and the rest of the exterior of the building. Bring your drills, gloves, sunblock, glasses, and hats. The food so far has been exceptional. Thank you for those of you who have donated food, money, time, and energy we want to send a big thank you. We could use more help with food preparations and any donations. Jim Haulman has pulled through with his expertise and is fulfilling his promises with great skill!

Nuestro proyecto de construcción va muy bien. Como se puede ver en las fotos de abajo, ha habido un gran progreso en nuestro edificio! Nos encontramos en un punto en el que vamos a necesitar más trabajadores que soportar el revestimiento y el resto del exterior del edificio. Traiga sus taladros, guantes, bloqueador solar, gafas y sombreros. La comida ha sido hasta ahora excepcional. Gracias por aquellos de ustedes que han donado alimentos, dinero, tiempo y energía que queremos enviar un gran agradecimiento para usted. Podríamos usar más ayuda con los preparados alimenticios y de cualquier donación. Jim Haulman ha sacado adelante con su experiencia y está cumpliendo sus promesas con gran destreza!

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here you can see the assembly of the roof frame.

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a high lift forklift was used.

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the food donations have been awesome.

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July 7th BARN RAISING GATHERING

July 7th BARN RAISING GATHERINGPicture-008

Dear Friends,

The Singing Stone would like to invite everyone to assist in our BARN RAISING GATHERING which starts on Monday, July 7th and will continue through the week. Our metal structure at 1074 Lariat Trail in Crestone, Colorado will be used for Ceremonies in the future as well as retreats. If you would like to become a part of The Singing Stone community, take this opportunity to be one of the founders of its conception. It has been almost a year since we hired a professional to put up this metal building and he has not followed through with the completion even though he has been paid. WE ARE DESPERATE TO GET IT GOING and need everyone’s help!

building so far....

All are welcome to camp on The Singing Stone land. We have well water available but conditions are such that you need to be prepared with your own tent, blankets, flashlight, and whatever else you would need to be comfortable. Directions are on our Location page. We need a lot of people to help out physically with getting this building up. If you or anyone you know is familiar with this sort of construction project and wish to donate some of your time, energy, and expertise, we really appreciate it. Please spread the word. Also, help with feeding our workers is needed so we are grateful to anyone willing to donate food or help with food preparations.march2014 016If you are unable to help out at the date mentioned above, consider donating anything that would help us. This will be a communal building so we will need beds, kitchen supplies, furniture, and anything else that you feel would be helpful. Any monetary donations would certainly be remembered in the future when our structure is complete. We will also be needing a full range of construction materials such as sheet rock for the rooms and a good flooring for our Ceremonial space in the center. Other items needed are paint, lumber, plumbing or electrical supplies, rugs, and more. We will be off the grid so any solar panels or other solar equipment is needed as well. We hope to see you during this week in July to connect with each other while working towards this amazing cause for all of our futures. Please call if you have any questions. Mitakuye Oyasin!

                    (719)-256-5307            conjurespirits@gmail.com

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(719)-937-1991

March 2014 building project,

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The month of March has seen some nice improvements. The picture on the right shows the future Sundance grounds cleared and ready for work. Grass seed needs to be put down along with the proper soil amendments. An irrigation system will be Installed so the we can have some grass! On the building you can see that the main roof beams have been put into place.

February 2014 building project

February 2014 building project has been a struggle so far. Our contractor has been dragging his feet and avoiding work as much as possible. He is in trouble with several other people for unfinished work. Being spiritually centered, The Singing Stone is prepared to wait and avoid negative confrontations. Some work has been done on the building and we are steadily amassing more materials. We have more doors, beds and furnishings.  We have a good source for lumber to frame up the interior walls. We are planning to put the individual walls together now and assemble them into rooms later.building 2014 046

Our attention is on our Sun Dance grounds. The whole area needs to be cleared and leveled. This is a good time to plant grass seed as well as mapping out the arbour and tipi sites. The wood for the arbour will be collected from the National Forest. This can only be done after the mud dries up, which is in a month or two. we have plenty of help, but we can always use more. If we have to, we will have to put up this building ourselves. With enough participation and willingness of spirit, we can accomplish anything. If any of you are willing to help, contact us at: conjurespirits@gmail.com.

Click here to see our contractor’s reviews.  (The good news is that these complaints have been resolved!)building 2014 047

Bear Dance

Bear Dance

Black Bear

Each year, at Eagle’s Nest Center in Westfield, Wisconsin, Robert and Judy hold their annual spring Bear Dance. This year, 2014, the dance will begin on May 23rd, (friday) and will end on Monday the 26th. All are welcome to experience this empowering and uplifting ceremony.

Join us in Westfield, Wisconsin each year for the spring time Bear Dance!!!

We warmly welcome all to participate in this annual dance. Be a part of the Bear society by joining in the festivities.This dance is all inclusive and does not require commitments.

 Each dancer will make prayer flags as well as prayer ties. These items will be made just before dancing, so bring a yard of red, yellow, black and white cotton fabric. Bring a quarter yard of blue, green and purple cotton fabric.

For more information on this contact us at: conjurespirits@gmail.com.

AMERICAN INDIAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT

American Indian Religious Freedom Act

Congressional Seal

The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Public Law No. 95-341, 92 Stat. 469 (Aug. 11, 1978) , codified at 42 U.S.C. § 1996, is a United States federal law and a joint resolution of Congress that was passed in 1978. It was enacted to protect and preserve the traditional religious rights and cultural practices of American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians  These rights include, but are not limited to, access of sacred sites, freedom to worship through ceremonial and traditional rights and use and possession of objects considered sacred. The Act required policies of all governmental agencies to eliminate interference with the possession of objects considered sacred, based on the First Amendment, and to accommodate access to and use of religious sites to the extent that the use is practicable and is not inconsistent with an agency’s essential functions. It also acknowledges the prior violation of that right.                                                                                          108 STAT. 3126 Oct. 6 AMERICAN INDIAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM P.L. 103-344

“(d) Nothing in this section shall be construed as abrogating, diminishing, or otherwise affecting– “(1) the inherent rights of any Indian tribe; “(2) the rights, express or implicit, of any Indian tribe which exist under treaties, Executive orders, and laws of the United States; “(3) the inherent right of Indians to practice their religions; and “(4) the right of Indians to practice their religions under any Federal or State law.”.

Approved October 6, 1994.

Public Law 95-341 95th Congress

Joint Resolution American Indian Religious Freedom.

Whereas the freedom of religion for all people is an inherent right, fundamental to the democratic structure of the United States and is guaranteed by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution;

Whereas the United States has traditionally rejected the concept of a government denying individuals the right to practice their religion, and as a result, has benefited from a rich variety of religious heritages in this country;

Whereas the religious practices of the American Indian (as well as Native Alaskan and Hawaiian) are an integral part of their culture, tradition, and heritage, such practices forming the basis of Indian identity and value systems;

Whereas the traditional American Indian religions as an integral part of Indian life, are indispensable and irreplaceable;

Whereas the lack of a clear, comprehensive, and consistent Federal policy has often resulted in the abridgment of religious freedom for traditional American Indians;

Whereas such religious infringements result from the lack of knowledge of the insensitive and inflexible enforcement of Federal policies and regulations premised on a variety of laws;

Whereas such laws were designed for such worthwhile purposes as conservation and preservation of natural species and resources but were never intended to relate to Indian religious practices and, there, were passed without consideration of their effect on traditional American Indian religions;

Whereas such laws and policies often deny American Indians access to sacred sites required in their religions, including cemeteries;

Whereas such laws at times prohibit the use and possession of sacred objects necessary to the exercise of religious rites and ceremonies;

Whereas traditional American Indian ceremonies have been intruded upon, interfered with, and in a few instances banned;

Now, therefore, be it Resolved by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of American in Congress Assembled, That henceforth it shall be the policy of the United States to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express, and exercise the traditional religions of the American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut, and Native Hawaiians, including but not limited to access to sites, use and possession of sacred objects, and the freedom to worship through ceremonials and traditional rites.

SEC. 2. The President shall direct that various Federal departments, agencies, and other instrumentalities responsible for the administering relevant laws to evaluate their policies and procedures in consultation with Native traditional religious leaders in order to determine appropriate changes necessary to protect and preserve Native American religious cultural rights and practices. Twelve months after approval of this resolution, the President shall report back to Congress the results of his evaluation, including any changes which were made in administrative policies and procedures, and any recommendations he may have for legislative action.

Approved August 11, 1978.

 FEDERAL LAW: Members of the Native American Church are exempt from federal criminal penalties for religious use of peyote. Where there is exclusive federal jurisdiction or state law is not racially limited, peyote use by NAC members is legal under a racially neutral regulation. This exemption is as old as federal criminal penalties against peyote use and predates the Controlled Substances Act. The Code Of Federal Regulations reads:

Special Exempt Persons: Section 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the non-drug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native American Church, and members of the Native American Church so using peyote are exempt from registration. Any person who manufactures peyote for or distributes peyote to the Native American Church, however, is required to obtain registration annually and to comply with all other requirements of law. U.S. v. BOYLL, 774 F.Supp. 133 (D.N.M. 1991) addresses the racial issue specifically and concludes:

For the reasons set out in this Memorandum Opinion and Order, the Court holds that, pursuant to 21 C.F.R. § 1307.31 (1990), the classification of peyote as a Schedule I controlled substance, see 21 U.S.C. § 812(c), Schedule I(c)(12), does not apply to the importation, possession or use of peyote for bona fide ceremonial use by members of the Native American Church, regardless of race.  PUBLIC LAW 103-344 [H.R. 4230]; October 6, 1994

AMERICAN INDIAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT
AMENDMENTS OF 1994

For Legislative History of Act, see Report for P.L. 103-344 in U.S.C.C.   A.N. Legislative History Section.

An Act to emend the American Indian Religious Freedom Act to provide for the traditional use of peyote by Indians for religious purposes, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the “American Indian Religious Freedom Act Amendments of 1994″. SEC. 2. TRADITIONAL INDIAN RELIGIOUS USE OF THE PEYOTE SACRAMENT.

The Act of August 11, 1978 (42 U.S.C. 1996), commonly referred to as the “American Indian Religious Freedom Act”, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new section: “SEC. 3. (a) The Congress finds and declares that– “(1) for many Indian people, the traditional ceremonial use of the peyote cactus as a religious sacrament has for cen- turies been integral to a way of life, and significant in perpetuating Indian tribes and cultures; “(2) since 1965, this ceremonial use of peyote by Indians has been protected by Federal regulation; “(3) while at least 28 States have enacted laws which are similar to, or are in conformance with, the Federal regula- tion which protects the ceremonial use of peyote by Indian religious practitioners, 22 States have not done so, and this lack of uniformity has created hardship for Indian people who participate in such religious ceremonies; “(4) the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of Employment Division v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990), held that the First Amendment does not protect Indian practitioners who use peyote in Indian religious ceremonies, and also raised uncertainty whether this religious practice would be protected under the compelling State interest standard; and “(5) the lack of adequate and clear legal protection for the religious use of peyote by Indians may serve to stigmatize and marginalize Indian tribes and cultures, and increase the risk that they will be exposed to discriminatory treatment. “(b)(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the use, possession, or transportation of peyote by an Indian for bona fide traditional ceremonial purposes in connection with the practice of a traditional Indian religion is lawful, and shall not be prohibited by the United States or any State. No Indian shall be penalized or discriminated against on the basis of such use, possession or transportation, including, but not limited to, denial of otherwise applicable benefits under public assistance programs. “(2) This section does not prohibit such reasonable regulation and registration by the Drug Enforcement Administration of those persons who cultivate, harvest, or distribute peyote as may be consistent with the purposes of this Act. “(3) This section does not prohibit application of the provisions of section 481.111(a) of Vernon’s Texas Health and Safety Code Annotated, in effect on the date of enactment of this section, insofar as those provisions pertain to the cultivation, harvest, and distribu- tion of peyote. “(4) Nothing in this section shall prohibit any Federal depart- ment or agency, in carrying out its statutory responsibilities and functions, from promulgating regulations establishing reasonable limitations on the use or ingestion of peyote prior to or during the performance of duties by sworn law enforcement officers or personnel directly involved in public transportation or any other safety-sensitive positions where the performance of such duties may be adversely affected by such use or ingestion. Such regulations shall be adopted only after consultation with representatives of traditional Indian religions for which the sacramental use of peyote is integral to their practice. Any regulation promulgated pursuant to this section shall be subject to the balancing test set forth in section 3 of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (Public Law 103-141; 42 U.S.C. 2OOObb-1). “(5) This section shall not be construed as requiring prison authorities to permit, nor shall it be construed to prohibit prison authorities from permitting, access to peyote by Indians while incar- cerated within Federal or State prison facilities. “(6) Subject to the provisions of the Religious Freedom Restora- tion Act (Public Law 103-141; 42 U.S.C. 2000bb-1), this section shall not be construed to prohibit States from enacting or enforcing reasonable traffic safety laws or regulations. “(7) Subject to the provisions of the Religious Freedom Restora- tion Act (Public Law 103-141; 42 USC 2000bb-1), this section does not prohibit the Secretary of Defense from promulgating regu- lations establishing reasonable limitations on the use, possession, transportation, or distribution of peyote to promote military readi- ness, safety, or compliance with international law or laws of other countries. Such regulations shall be adopted only after consultation with representatives of traditional Indian religions for which the sacramental use of peyote is integral to their practice. “(c) For purposes of this section– “(1) the term ‘Indian’ means a member of an Indian tribe; “(2) the term ‘Indian tribe’ means any tribe, band, nation, pueblo, or other organized group or community of Indians, including any Alaska Native village (as defined in, or estab- lished pursuant to, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. l601 et seq.)), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provide by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians; “(3) the term ‘Indian religion’ means any religion– “(A) which is practiced by Indians; and “(B) the origin and interpretation of which is from within a traditional Indian culture or community; and “(4) the term ‘State’ means any State of the United States and any political subdivision thereof.

108 STAT. 3126
Oct. 6
AMERICAN INDIAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM
P.L. 103-344

“(d) Nothing in this section shall be construed as abrogating, diminishing, or otherwise affecting– “(1) the inherent rights of any Indian tribe; “(2) the rights, express or implicit, of any Indian tribe which exist under treaties, Executive orders, and laws of the United States; “(3) the inherent right of Indians to practice their religions; and “(4) the right of Indians to practice their religions under any Federal or State law.”.

Approved October 6, 1994.

Public Law 95-341 95th Congress

Joint Resolution American Indian Religious Freedom.

Whereas the freedom of religion for all people is an inherent right, fundamental to the democratic structure of the United States and is guaranteed by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution;

Whereas the United States has traditionally rejected the concept of a government denying individuals the right to practice their religion, and as a result, has benefited from a rich variety of religious heritages in this country;

Whereas the religious practices of the American Indian (as well as Native Alaskan and Hawaiian) are an integral part of their culture, tradition, and heritage, such practices forming the basis of Indian identity and value systems;

Whereas the traditional American Indian religions as an integral part of Indian life, are indispensable and irreplaceable;

Whereas the lack of a clear, comprehensive, and consistent Federal policy has often resulted in the abridgment of religious freedom for traditional American Indians;

Whereas such religious infringements result from the lack of knowledge of the insensitive and inflexible enforcement of Federal policies and regulations premised on a variety of laws;

Whereas such laws were designed for such worthwhile purposes as conservation and preservation of natural species and resources but were never intended to relate to Indian religious practices and, there, were passed without consideration of their effect on traditional American Indian religions;

Whereas such laws and policies often deny American Indians access to sacred sites required in their religions, including cemeteries;

Whereas such laws at times prohibit the use and possession of sacred objects necessary to the exercise of religious rites and ceremonies;

Whereas traditional American Indian ceremonies have been intruded upon, interfered with, and in a few instances banned;

Now, therefore, be it Resolved by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of American in Congress Assembled, That henceforth it shall be the policy of the United States to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express, and exercise the traditional religions of the American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut, and Native Hawaiians, including but not limited to access to sites, use and possession of sacred objects, and the freedom to worship through ceremonials and traditional rites.

SEC. 2. The President shall direct that various Federal departments, agencies, and other instrumentalities responsible for the administering relevant laws to evaluate their policies and procedures in consultation with Native traditional religious leaders in order to determine appropriate changes necessary to protect and preserve Native American religious cultural rights and practices. Twelve months after approval of this resolution, the President shall report back to Congress the results of his evaluation, including any changes which were made in administrative policies and procedures, and any recommendations he may have for legislative action.

Approved August 11, 1978.

Due to the criticism of the AIRFA and its inability to enforce the provisions it outlined in 1978. On June 10, 1994 the House of Representatives, Committee on Natural resources and Subcommittee on Native American Affairs met to bring about H.R. 4155 in order to provide for the management of federal lands in a way that doesn’t frustrate the traditional religions and religious purposes of Native Americans. Also, H.R. 4230 was set forth to amend the American Indian Religious Freedom Act to provide for the traditional use of peyote as sacrament in religious ceremonies.

H.R. 4155

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE This Act may be cited as the “American Indian Religious Freedom Act Amendments of 1994.” SECTION 2. FINDINGS.The Congress finds that- (1) unlike any other established religion, many traditional Native American Religions are site-speccific in that the Native American religions hold certain lands or natural formations to be sacred; (2) such sacred sites are an integral and vital part of the Native American religions and the religious practices associated with such religions; (3) many of these sacred sites are found on lands which were formerly part of the aboriginal territory of the Indians but which now are held by the Federal Government; and (4) lack of sensitivity or understanding of traditional Native American religions on the part of Federal agencies vested with the management of Federal lands has resulted in the lack of a coherent policy for the management of sacred sites found on Federal lands and has also resulted in the infringement upon the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. SEC. 3. MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL LANDS SO AS TO NOT UNDERMINE NATIVE AMERICAN RELIGIOUS PRACTICES.Public Law 95-341 (42 U.S.C. 1996), popularly known as the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new section: “SEC. 3. (a)(1) Except as provided by subsection (b), no Federal lands described in paragraph (2) may be managed in a manner that undermines and frustrates a traditional Native American religion or religious practice. “(2) The Federal lands referred to in paragraph (1) are those lands that- “(A) have historically been considered sacred and indispensable by a traditional Native American religion, and “(B) are necessary to the conduct of a Native American religious practice. “(b) Subsection (a)(1) shall not apply to a management decision that is necessary to protect a compelling governmental interest. In making such a management decision, the Federal agency shall attempt to accommodate the various competing interests and shall, to the greatest extent feasible, select course of action that is the least intrusive on traditional Native American religions or religious practices. “(c) An Indian tribe or a member of an Indian trive may, upon showing of actual harm suffered by such tribe may, upon showing of actual harm suffered by such tribe or member, bring an action in the appropriate United States district court against any person who is violating, or who has violated, the prohibition contained in this section. In any such action, the court may enjoin such violation or issue such orders as may be necessary to enforce such prohibition or to require that action be taken to remedy such violation, or any combination of the foregoing. “(d) Nothing in this section shall be interpreted as requiring any Federal agency to totally deny public access to Federal lands. “(e) As used in this section- “(1) The term ‘Federal Lands’ has the same meaning as provided by section 2(5) of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (25 U.S.C. 3001(5). “(2) The term ‘Indian Tribe’ means any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688) (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. “(3) The term ‘tribal lands’ includes Indian reservations; public domain Indian allotments; former Indian reservations in Oklahoma; land held by incorporated Native groups, regional corporations, and village corporations under the provisions of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.); an dependent Indian communities within the borders of the United States, whether within the original or subsequently acquired territory thereof and whether within or without the limits of a State.”.

 

H.R. 4230

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “American Indian Religious Freedom Act Amendments of 1994″. SEC. 2. TRADITIONAL INDIAN RELIGIOUS USE OF THE PEYOTE SACRAMENT.The Act of August 11, 1978 (42 U.S.C. 1996), commonly referred to as the “American Indian Religious Freedom Act”, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new section: “SEC. 3. (a) The Congress finds and declares that – “(1) for many Indian people, the traditional ceremonial use of the peyote cactus as a religious sacrament has for centuries been integral to a way of life, and significant in perpetuating Indian tribes and cultures; “(2) since 1965, this ceremonial use of peyote by Indians has been protected by Federal regulation; “(3) while at least 28 States have enacted laws which are similar to, or are in conformance with, the Federal regulation which protects the ceremonial use of peyote by Indian religious practitioners, many States have not done so, and this lack of uniformity has created hardship for Indian people who participate in such religious ceremonies; “(4) the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of Employment Division v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990), held that the First Amendment does not protect Indian practitionaers who use peyote in Indian religious ceremonies, and also raised uncertainty whether this religious practice would be protected under the compelling of the State interest standard and “(5) the lack of adequate and clear legal protection for the religious use of peyote by Indians may serve to stigmatize and marginalize Indian tribes and cultures, and increase the risk that they will be exposed to discriminatory treatment in violation of the religious guarantees of the First Amendment of the Constitution. “(b)(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of the law, the use, possession, or transportation or peyote by an Indian who uses peyote in a traditional manner for bona fide ceremonial purposes in connection with the practice of a traditional Indian religion is lawful, and shall not be prohibited by the United States or by any State. No Indian shall be penalized or discriminated against on the basis of such use, possession or transportation, including, but not limited to, denial of otherwise applicable benefits under piblic assistance programs. “(2) This section does not prohibit such reasonable regulation and registration of those persons who cultivate, harvest, or distribute peyote as may be consistent with the purposes of this Act. “(3) This section does not prohibit application of the provisions of section 481.111(a) of Vernon’s Texas Health and Safety Code Annotated, in effect on the date of enactment of this section, insofar as those provisions pertain to the cultivation, harvest, and distribution of peyote. “(c) For purposes of this section- “(1) the term ‘Indian’ means a member of an Indian tribe; “(2) the term ‘Indian tribe’ means any tribe, band, nation, pueblo, or other organized group or community of Indians, including any Alask Native village (as defined in, or established pursuant to, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.S. 1601 et seq.)), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians; “(3) the term ‘Indian religion’ means any religion- “(A) which is practiced by Indians, and “(B) the origin and interpretation of which is from within a traditional Indian culture or community; and “(4) the term ‘State’ means any State of the United States, and any political subdivision thereof. “(d) Nothing in this section shall be contrued as abrogating, diminishing, or otherwise affecting- “(A) the inherent rights of any Indian tribe; “(B) the rights, express of implicit, of any Indian tribe which exist under treaties, executive orders, and laws of the United States; “(C) the inherent right of the Indians to practice their religions under any Federal or State law.”.

Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993107 STAT. 1488, Public Law 103-141[Partially overturned for state-law matters on June 25th, 1997]Passed by 103rd CongressNov 16, 1993

AN ACT

    To protect the free exercise of religion.Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
    United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1, SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the “Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993″.

SECTION 2, CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF PURPOSES.

  1. FINDINGS.—The Congress finds—
    1. the framers of the Constitution, recognizing free exercise of religion as an unalienable right, secured its protection in the First Amendment to the Constitution;
    2. laws “neutral” toward religion may burden religious exercise as surely as laws intended to interfere with religious exercise;
    3. governments should not substantially burden religious exercise without compelling justification;
    4. in Employment Division v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990) the Supreme Court virtually eliminated the requirement that the government justify burdens on religious exercise imposed by laws neutral toward religion; and
    5. the compelling interest test as set forth in prior Federal court rulings is a workable test for striking sensible balances between religious liberty and competing prior governmental interests.
  2. PURPOSES.—The purposes of this Act are—
    1. to restore the compelling interest test as set forth in Sherbert v. Verner, 374 U.S. 398 (1963) and Wisconsin v. Yoder, 406 U.S. 205 (1972) and to guarantee its application in all cases where free exercise of religion is substantially burdened; and
    2. to provide a claim or defense to persons whose religious exercise is substantially burdened by government.

SECTION 3, FREE EXERCISE OF RELIGION PROTECTED.

  1. IN GENERAL.—Government shall not substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability, except as provided in subsection (b).
  2. EXCEPTION.—Government may substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion only if it determines that application of the burden to the person—
    1. is in furtherance of a compelling governmental interest; and
    2. is the least restrictive means of furthering that compelling governmental interest.
    3. JUDICIAL RELIEF.—A person whose religious exercise has been burdened in violation of this section may assert that violation as a claim or defense in a judicial proceeding and obtain appropriate relief against a government. Standing to assert a claim or defense under this section shall be governed by the general rules of standing under article III of the Constitution.

SECTION 4, ATTORNEYS FEES.

  1. JUDICIAL PROCEEDINGS.—Section 722 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (42 U.S.C. 1988) is amended by inserting “the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993,” before “or title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964″.
  2. ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS.—Section 504(b)(1)(C) of title 5, United States Code, is amended—
    1. by striking “and” at the end of clause (ii);
    2. by striking the semicolon at the end of clause (iii) and inserting “;and”; and
    3. by inserting “(iv) the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993″ after clause (iii).

SECTION 5, DEFINITIONS.

As used in this Act–

  1. the term “government includes a branch, department, agency, instrumentality, and official (or other person acting under color of law) of the United States, a State, or a subdivision of a State;
  2. the term “State” includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and each territory and possession of the United States;
  3. the term “demonstrates” means meets the burden of going forward with the evidence and of persuasion; and
  4. the term “exercise of religion” means exercise of religion under the First Amendment to the Constitution.

SECTION 6, APPLICABILITY.

  1. IN GENERAL.—This Act applies to all Federal and State law, and the implementation of that law, whether statutory or otherwise, and whether adopted before or after the enactment of the Act.
  2. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.—Federal statutory law adopted after the date of the enactment of this Act is subject to this Act unless such law explicitly excludes such application by reference to this Act.
  3. RELIGIOUS BELIEF UNAFFECTED.—Nothing in this Act shall be construed to authorize any government to burden any religious belief.

SECTION 7, ESTABLISHMENT CLAUSE UNAFFECTED.

Nothing in this Act shall be construed to affect, interpret, or in any way address that portion of the First Amendment prohibiting laws respecting the establishment of religion (referred to in this section as the “Establishment Clause”). Granting government funding, benefits, or exemptions, to the extent permissible under the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, shall not constitute a violation of this Act. As used in this section, the term “granting”, used with respect to government funding, benefits, or exemptions, does not include a denial of government funding, benefits, or exemptions.

Approved November 16, 1993.


Nov. 16, 1993
[H.R. 1308]
Sec. 2 is 42 USC 2000bb
Sec. 3 is 42 USC 2000bb-1
Sec. 4 is 42 USC 2000bb-1
Sec. 5 is 42 USC 2000bb-2
Sec. 6 is 42 USC 2000bb-3
Sec. 7 is 42 USC 2000bb-4


LEGISLATIVE HISTORY — H.R. 1308 (S. 578):


HOUSE REPORTS: No. 103-88 (Comm. on the Judiciary).
SENATE REPORTS: No. 103-111 accompanying S. 578 (Comm. on the Judiciary).
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 139 (1993):
May 11, considered and passed House.
Oct. 26, 27, S. 578 considered in Senate; H.R. 1308, amended, passed in lieu.
Nov. 3, House concurred in Senate amendment.
WEEKLY COMPILATION OF PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS, Vol. 29 (1993):
Nov. 16, Presidential remarks.

2013 Building update

December Building update: With much delay and unusually cold weather, we are finally seeing the assembly of our structure. All the structural building materials arrived in November after the pouring of the foundation. The late delivery of exterior doors and windows was a welcome sight this month. A fork-lift will erect the main beams. After the frame is up, the outer coverings will go into place. This should take some time and also depends upon the weather.

November Building update: We are happy to announce that the pouring of our foundation has begun. We have awaited this glorious moment for so long! All of our prayers are set in stone and have become concrete!

The creation of a form for our foundation began at 8:00 am November 6. The work entailed the placement of all pluming pipes, water pipes coming in and sewer going out. These will be going through the foundation, so it is crucial to our planning. With this type of structure it is important to have a solid foundation, not only figuratively, but literally as well. All the activity has caused us to review the floor plans as well as the activity’s that will make this such a wonderful place to be.

November 7: Cement trucks took turns backing up to the boom truck to unload. The picture below is a far away view.November2013 019

Here you can see the first part of the pour.November2013 025November2013 027

Aliya planted the prayer flags around the ceremonial space.November2013 033November2013 032

 November2013 038 November2013 039 November2013 036 November2013 037

November2013 044 November2013 045

Things went pretty smoothly until a cement truck got stuck!

November2013 043November2013 047

Work continued into the night. Thank-you to Mark Potter for saving the cement trucks.

November2013 051November2013 048

We need building materials!           

 We finally acquired the sink we want and added it to our collection of supplies, So far we have the following:

Industrial stainless sink.

2 Toilets.

Kitchen Cabinetry.

Conference chairs.

Folding tables.

Children’s Dining tables.

2 Interior doors.

We will be needing: 12 more interior doors, Door frames, 2 bathroom sinks, 2 shower  heads, a bath tub, Bathroom Cabinets, Lockers, Gas or wood oven, Gas range, Large pots and pans, Mirrors, Furniture, Rugs, Curtains, Gas dryer, Gas water heater, Solar panels, Solar water panels, Solar Electric inverter and Equipment, Solar Battery Set, Wood stoves, Propane refrigerator and a whole lot of help. If you are interested in donating time, MONEY, supplies or suggestions contact us at  conjurespirits@gmail.com. We need a lot of other things as well, so if you think of what you can contribute, let us know. To give us a monetary gift use the Donation button on our HOME page

00307292013_1235 (2)

 

Building update :October 22 2013

Well Truck

Well Truck and backhoe

Well TruckView of the mountains behind the well equipment ( Eastern View ).

South East Corner of building

oct 22 051The land has been cleared for the foundation, from this view you can see three corners of the building. In the picture below you can see the excavation from the west.

oct 22 049

120 foot deep\ hit water at 10 feetoct 22 028This is the well itself. It is only 120 feet deep but they hit water at 10 feet. Now they will have to pump out the remaining sand and silt. Then we will have the pump installed. To pump water we will first be relying upon a generator, then we will transition to a solar powered system.

 

oct 22 026 This view is from the lot just west of us. Here we are looking west. The well will be on the north east corner of the building following the Indian science of vattsu. The Sun Dance arbor will be to the right of the photo.

Building progress October 16 2013

Eastern View from Building site

View from Building site, This will be the eastern view.

Planing the wellPlanning the Well on October 17 2013

Building site 2013

Building site 2013

October 2013 Building update

Well and foundation will begin on the 18th of October. We took this picture in order to document progress.This is the North Easterly view.

Delivery of building materials occurs on November 12

Please help us preserve Indigenous American Spirituality!

 

Building Project August 2013

 For many years we have planned a ceremonial grounds. Finally we have reached the crucial point when we are able to build a ceremonial structure that we can all use to celebrate the divine. This temple will serve as a home, an office, as well as ceremonial space. At this point we will start leveling and tamping the soil for the foundation. After the pour (Cement) we will erect the frame. then this winter we will finish the exterior. This is a steel building that will measure 80 x 82 feet and it will stand 20 feet tall. At this point our project will focus upon the exterior.

With the continued donations of materials, money and labor, we will forge ahead creating an interior that will spiritually nourish and bless many generations to come. This will house a 40 foot diameter space that will serve many groups in our area. guests will no longer have to rent a place or camp when we hold events. Those wishing to apprentice will simply reside here.

teepee used for the peyote ceremony

The end result will be a two story retreat house with two bathrooms, a kitchen, dining area with 9 bedrooms and a 50 foot diameter ceremonial space!

Canupa Ceremony

Canupa Ceremony

 To some the canupa ( sacred pipe ) is thought of as the peace pipe or calumet. To us it is more than that, it is the promise of the White Buffalo Calf Maidens’ return and a direct connecting link to the divine. The Canupa is the most important object as it represents the direct communication with the source of all life, sentient and insentient alike.

The word Canupa, pronounced Chan-unpa, in the Lakota language means smoking stick, or simply, pipe.   Pte Ska Win (Pte San Wi), or the White Buffalo Calf Maiden appeared to the people presenting them with the Canupa (pipe) made from a buffalo’s shin bone. Along with this gift the people received a small round stone of Caitlinite  as well as instructions for The Seven Sacred Rites.

1. The Inipi (Sweat Lodge Ceremony)
2.The Hanbleceya (crying for a vision)
3.The Ghost Keeping Ceremony (Wanagi yuhapi)
4.The Sun Dance (Wi Wanyang wacipi)
5.The Hunka Ceremony (‘the making of relatives)
6.The Girl’s Puberty Rite (Isnati awicalowan)
7.The Throwing of the Ball Ceremony (Tapa wankayeyapi). 

Some people would say that this list is inaccurate and it may well be. What we do know is that a sacred woman with supernatural powers gave the pipe with it’s 7 rites to the people. She also gave a song, White Buffalo Calf Woman Song, as well as the promise to return to the people one day. The true story of Pte Ska Win is not as popular as it’s Christian version, but here we will speak about the Sacred pipe and leave the rest of the story for others to tell.

 Aside from the seven rites is the Canupa Ceremony itself. The pipe’s stone bowl and the stem is smudged in the smoke of the Mugwort plant, (somtimes reffered as sage). The two are then joined together symbolizing the connection with the divine. The pipe is filled with Red willow inner-bark usually while singing Canunpa Olawan, (pipe song). This is done at the start of all of the seven rites as well as any important occasion.

The Canupa is passed clockwise being sure not to separate the stone bowl from the wooden stem. Participants take 4 small puffs and pass the pipe along. Those who don’t wish to puff on the pipe simply touch there shoulders and the top of their head with the pipe’s stem in blessing. Among some groups this can be a very elaborate ordeal, but among the humble it is a very plain and simple act. The pipe is seen as the most important object, it is the greatest means of communicating with the divine.

The original Canupa is believed to be kept in a place known as Green Grass on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, but no one knows for sure. A lot of controversy still surrounds this issue. The importance here is to remember that Pte Ska Win brought it to the people. Do this by keeping it sacred, not blending it with foreign concepts, and understanding its’ history! The use of the Canupa was given to the Lakota people by the White Buffalo Calf Maiden along with the Seven Sacred Rites hundreds of years ago according to Lakota records painted on buffalo hides.

The Sacred Pipe itself, according to Archaeologists, may have started any where from about 4,000 to 14,000 years ago. Countless thousands of pipes have been unearthed from the Hopewell culture in the Ohio Valley, some of which represent woolly mammoth and manatee!

Yuwipi Ceremony

YUWIPI CEREMONY

        We believe in the night sing, the power of Inyan the stone, the miraculous healing power of the ancestors and the sacred songs.  We believe in the Wiwila Little people, animal spirits, and the various other Tunkasila (spirits). We believe in the emptiness of the Medicine Man as a hollow bone for the spirits’ work.

Yuwipi Ceremony

Painted Buffalo Skull

A Yuwipi  Ceremony is known as a Night Sing. Invocation songs are sung in a darkened room to call upon the help of woodland spirits. Fairies, little people, stone spirits, and animals arrive creating an almost indescribable situation.  This ritual is a profound experience of spiritual beings manifesting into the physical.

If you are planning to attend a Yuwip\Lowanpi, there are some details that must be mentioned. Women on their moon time (menses) may not attend this Ceremony. Women who do attend must be fully clothed covering shoulders and knees. It is traditional for women to wear a shawl but not mandatory. No shiny objects or electronics are allowed (cell phones, watches, or jewelry). Children are welcome to attend and usually fall asleep so blankets and pillows are helpful. Participants may bring a pillow or blanket to sit on as well. There will be no bathroom breaks so try not to drink large amounts of liquid before the Ceremony. 

 Black Bear

This ceremony truly defines what Shamanism is and it is considered by many anthropologists and archaeologists to have been the Neanderthal’s primary religion. The Yuwipi, Sweat Lodge and Vision quest are considered a trinity of rites. This practice is used for healing, connecting with spirits, finding things and solutions to problems.  We begin with a sweat lodge rite (Hanbleceya) and an explanation of the evening’s events.

The Medicine Man is bound within a sacred blanket and laid down upon a special altar to commune with spirits and enter into their world.  Flickering lights can be seen in the darkness along with many other hard to describe things.  The spirits are able to remove illnesses from people as well as answer questions from beyond.  The spirits can be sent to find lost objects or people and even preform healings outside of the circle.  Yuwipi is also known as the tent shaking rite and is famous for its levitation and other unexplained phenomenon.  This experience lasts a few hours and always takes place after dusk.  The event is followed by a meal and another optional sweat lodge the next morning.

Listen to Yuwipi songs by clicking this link !

PETA WAKAN

The Night Sing, or Lowanpi, is probably the most fascinating rite in the western hemisphere. Anthropologists believe that it has its origins in Siberia and that it spread from there to many places throughout the world. It is believed to have been practiced in Nepal and northern China thousands of years ago.  There are ancient traces of it among the Laplander, The Mongols, The Icelandic peoples and The Amazonian. Resent findings suggest it was prevalent among the Maya and Aztec.

In the 1960′s it is said to have died out in Siberia but it has made a resent come back from North America. Versions of the Yuwipi/Lowanpi have long been practiced by tribes of the Northern and Eastern United states. The Tent Shaking rite among the Ojibwa were well documented in the 1800s, as well as the various plains tribes.                      

When the Medicine Man is tied and bound it is known as a Yuwipi rather than Lowanpi, which uses no bindings. It is this act of tying, untying, the frame drum, as well as the general events of the ceremony are what allowed Anthropologists to trace the yuwipi to Siberia and beyond. The Canli Pahta, or prayer ties are a purely Lakota element in this beautiful practice.

Recently, people say things like “these ceremonies came about when our people had to hide their spiritual practices”. These views are inconsistent with Anthropological and Archaeological facts as the Yuwipi is thought of as the Neanderthal’s primary religion. The Yuwipi, Sweat Lodge and Vision quest are considered a trinity of rites. There is some question that the Yuwipi/Lowanpi was ever one of the Seven Sacred Rites of the White Buffalo Calf Woman. Elders have varying opinions on the subject. In the case of the Lakota version of Yuwipi, the  Prayer Ties and the use of the Sacred Pipe were, at some point, added to the Yuwipi. Similarly  songs as well as other elements have come from the Yuwipi/Lowanpi and entered into the Sundance.

These ways may have come from Siberia, but the reverse may be the case just as well. One thing is definite, the Yuwipi, Inipi (Sweat Lodge) and Hanbleceya (Vision Quest) spread with the mastodon hunters who followed the herds. It is Well documented that the yuwipi, the ceremony that truly defines Shamanism, moved with the migration of the mastodon. The Lakota primarily hunted Unhcegila (Mastodon), as did various other tribes.

The healing that occurs in these ceremonies  may not be accompanied by any tactile sensations. This does not affect the power of the healing.  The most difficult manifestation seems to be for the spirits to make sound. Auditory experiences seem to occur less (the singing or speaking of spirits) than tactile ones. There are no real generalizations though, it is up to the Spirits alone, next it is up to the Medicine Man’s relationship with those beings and last but not least the faith of the participants.

It is strange to see the (new-age) shamanic drumming sessions that are so popular now. This practice is directly mimicking the ancient ways without any of the outward manifestations or initiation  that are usual to these ceremonies. It is Interesting to note that certain individuals are born with, or acquire the ability to create situations characteristic to Yuwipi. Daniel Dunglas Home and Carlos Mirabelli are two individuals known to have brought about such situations outside of Native American culture.

First thing one could experience in a Yuwipi or Lowanpi is levitation and movement the rattles and various other objects. Second thing would be flickering lights, rain, hail, wind and other similar sensations. The third type of manifestation one could expect is the touch of a spirit’s hand, the touch of an animal, Little person, or other such being’s touch. The fourth thing that can happen is teleportation.

The Yuwipi man may experience asphyxiation, usually followed by resurrection. This is not always the case as some times “the man in the middle” experiences dream like visions and communications without flat-lining. The visions are usually followed by the untying. The untying dose not always occur, even in profound situations. Another thing that the Yuwipi man may experience is levitation, being touched or lifted. Other than that, the Yuwipi man Has a very different experience from the rest of the people.

A Yuwipi man has a tremendous responsibly as he literally lays his life down for the sake of the people. He is fettered not only by his bindings but by the Yuwipi Spirits them selves. He is no longer a free man, in this life, or the next. It is said that each time he holds a ceremony he sacrifices part of his soul until his power is finally exhausted. After passing he works as a healer from the other side, though the ceremonies. I say “man” because it is for the “empty” man to be the (hollow bone) sacrifice for the fullness of the woman. There are accounts, though, of women, that after menopause, have done Lowanpi-like ceremonies. One dose not DECIDE to practice Yuwipi, They are chosen during Hanbleceya (Vision Quest). Do not reach out to the yuwipi spirits. let them reach out to you (this saying is meant figuratively as well as literally). 

The Yuwipi ritual may be held for very specific purposes.  Among them are healings, finding lost or stolen objects, and finding solutions to problems.   It is part of a trinity of rights, Yuwipi, Sweat lodge and Vision Quest.  After performing a sweat lodge, the rite begins in a room in which all lights can be extinguished.  The leader or Yuwipi man is bound within a quilt and laid face down in the center of the room, (Yuwipi means they tie him up).  The room is plunged into total darkness as the lead singer begins to drum and sing with great enthusiasm.  In the darkness the spirits play the rattles and untie the leader.

The lights are turned on and the Yuwipi man narrates the events of the ceremony and the sacred Canupa is passed round.  This all takes about four to six hours and is an evening event.  Yuwipi is followed by a  pot luck. The Yuwipi is an important Ceremonial that we are excited to have in our community as well as visitors from all over.

Singing for the Yuwipi/ Lowanpi ceremonies

Singing for Yuwipi / Lowanpi is a very serious matter. The lead singer and the accompaniment should not take it lightly. It is of utmost importance for the singer to be able to sense the man in the middle within the cover of total darkness as well as the coming and going of the various spirits that may be present. To get started the sacred Canupa will be filled with Cancasa with the accompaniment of the Pipe filling song or Opagipi Olowan. Sometimes two other pipe songs may be sung with it. Then for the tying this song can be sung although it is not necessary. Sometimes a special tying song is sung.          

It is important that this all happens swiftly and without delay (tying). As soon as the man is in the center face down the lights are extinguished and the directional song (Tatetopakiya Olowan) is sung. There are some very important things to know about this song. This song is received by the medicine man during vision quest and is his personal song. It is sometimes known as an altar song or as Wicakicopi Olowan (they call them song). This type of song can only be learned in person unless a regular directional song is being used. A good example of this would be the directional song of the sweat lodge.

Following the Directional song one usually hears spirit calling songs. This is usually accompanied by the spirit’s rapping,  shaking rattles (Wagmuha) or any such manifestations signalling the spirit’s arrival. These songs may vary greatly as each medicine person will need to call particular spirits. This part of the ceremony is leading up to the prayer round in which the intention will be stated to the spirits. Questions may be put to the spirits if needed or sometimes they may be dispatched to look in on a situation or to do something.

Prayer songs would be sung in preparation of the prayers. They are sung immediately following the calling songs in one continuous stream of music. The music then comes to a halt. Prayers will be made by the sponsor,  the Leader, the helper or by all present  depending on the ceremony’s purpose. After the prayers are made, singing would resume as the healing round begins.  Healing songs would be sung after the prayers as the spirits get to work on the sponsor and whomever requests to receive a healing. This usually happens after the prayer round. In some cases calling songs or animal songs could be added to these to effect a cure.

Depending on the medicine men a wide variety of songs can be sung now. It is common to hear Kettle songs, Ceh’ohomni Olowan. These are better known as Heyoka songs or Thunder being songs. These clown songs originally are used as part of the Kettle Dance and other Heyoka rites. It is said that the ghosts of the Heyoka Medicine men intervene in the Yuwipi /Lowanpi ceremony to affect a cure, who really knows? These songs may be sung solely to call the Thunder beings as well as other related spirits.

Many other songs can be sung, there are the stone songs, spider songs, and all the various animal songs. The spirits Do the untying with the untying song. This song is known as Wicayujujupi Olowan. No matter how the ceremony progresses or how it is preformed or whatever, the Spirits go home song and the closing song ( quitting ) are always sung. Sometimes a few songs are sung  just before this.

The singers actually call the spirits, they are the conjurers. The Yuwipi man is the conduit or medium of the spirits work. Usually, the spirits choose new yuwipi men from among the singers.

(If you feel you are chosen to do yuwipi first learn the songs, at least 28- 56 of them)

 

PETA WAKAN

Check our Events Calendar !

Una ceremonia Yuwipi es conocido como Night Sing. Cantos de invocación se cantan en un cuarto oscuro para recurrir a la ayuda de los espíritus del bosque. Hadas, gente pequeña, los espíritus de piedra, y los animales llegan creando una situación casi indescriptible. Este ritual es una experiencia profunda de los seres espirituales que se manifiestan en lo físico.

Esta ceremonia realmente define lo que es el chamanismo y es considerado por muchos antropólogos y arqueólogos que han sido la religión principal del Neanderthal. Esta práctica se utiliza para la curación, la conexión con los espíritus, la búsqueda de las cosas y las soluciones a los problemas. Comenzamos con un sudor lodge rito opcional y una explicación de los acontecimientos de la noche.

The Medicine Man está obligado dentro de un manto sagrado y lo acostó en un altar especial para estar en comunión con los espíritus y entrar en su mundo. Luces parpadeantes se pueden ver en la oscuridad junto con muchos otros difíciles de describir las cosas. Los espíritus son capaces de eliminar las enfermedades de las personas, así como responder a las preguntas de más allá.Los espíritus pueden ser enviados a buscar objetos o personas perdidas e incluso realizar curaciones fuera del círculo. Yuwipi es famoso por su levitación y otros fenómenos inexplicables. Esta experiencia dura unas pocas horas y siempre tiene lugar después del anochecer. El evento es seguido por una comida y otra casa de sudor opcional a la mañana siguiente.

Mire aquí para escuchar canciones Yuwipi !

PETA WAKAN

Painted Buffalo Skull

 

 

 

 

The power of Native song

The power of Native song is felt not only in how it is sung but most importantly in it’s origins. Hearing someone sing Amazing Grace can be riveting and moving experience.  The reasons for this are found in the circumstance in which that song was composed like many old church hymns, Amazing Grace was written under conditions of great duress and emotional intensity.  When one hears such songs it actually invokes the spirits involved and the flavor of the moment that imbues the song with real magic. This can be seen as evident in a very pragmatic and scientific way.

  A song of any kind represents a connecting link to a time and place of  it’s origins.  This takes place the way that electricity follows the current of a long copper wire.  It is simple to determine if a song carries power, what feelings does it evoke?  In our numb domestic culture it has become increasingly hard for people to sense the spiritual beings because they come as feelings.  In a domesticated world where most people aren’t even in touch with their own feelings, sensing the feelings in the wind like a wild animal does is quite unlikely.  Every so often you may sense a spirit without knowing what’s really happening.

  Let’s say you’re going through some old boxes and you handle an old hairbrush.  You look at it’s color or design and put it somewhere else thinking nothing of it.  Later around dusk you get a peculiar sensation reminding you of the smell of soap that was in your grandmother’s bathroom during your childhood.  This scenario represents the visitation of a spirit.  As humans we may link the sensation we had of spirits in our grandmother’s bathroom with the smell of her soap.  This is one reason why aromatic smudge herbs are used in any ritual in any culture.

Most people would think nothing of these kinds of feelings and would call them “memories”.  In a similar way one could get feelings handling a personal item that belonged to someone else’s family.  One may get an odd sensation or deja vu without realizing that they are sensing a spirit’s presence.  One too may assume, from the explanation, that the spirits sensed are ghosts, like the sensation of the grandmother.  What these sensations are, are elemental beings that follow an ancestral lineage like the water spirits sensed by the child in the grandmother’s bathroom.  Using this story as an analogy one may say that the smell of the soap or the handling of the hairbrush are like the songs in the act of calling the spirits.  Singing Amazing Grace in an all night Tipi Meeting you can feel the energy, or the flavor of the moment, dramatically shift.  Although the song is still within spiritual content it is still totally different in it’s origins and the mood from which it was born.

In the sweat lodge when someone sings a European based pseudo Indian camp song it feels like the generated momentum of the lodge is all of a sudden  flushed away leaving the strange barbaric feeling of Spanish Conquistadors or the lineages of other early settlers. The spirits in this case follow the families, the languages and other European influences, as well as the line of the song.  What I mean by the line of the song is it’s history.  Like an electric wire this line has the means of transmission.

There’s another aspects of songs where the concept of the “line of the spirits” is concerned.  Let’s say you made up a song with the intention of attracting a spirit.  Within the “flavor of the moment” that characterizes the spirits presence, you sing your song, and with it calling attention to yourself with this song.  You then have created a direct line to that specific spirit.  (Although this works do not assume that the spirits will behave the way you want or expect).  One could use a fragrance in the same way there is a connection between memory of smells with emotions.  In invoking spirits we are invoking memories, feelings.  The spirits are these feelings directly.  When you have a certain feeling of any kind you are actually embodying a spirit.  So by all this one can see that for a domestic human to summon the spirits of the wild, without a direct spiritual line of connection, is nearly impossible.  That is another one of our reasons for protecting and sharing these sacred ancient songs.  They can be of immeasurable aid to the future population of nerds that our culture is creating.  At a time when intelligence eclipses intuition altogether there can still be the hope of the spirits possible intervention.

Taking a close analytical analysis of primordial spiritual songs we can find some very interesting points.  First of all, ancient spiritual traditions of the world use what is known as the pentatonic scale.  It is based upon the number five and it predates the harmonic scale.  Pentatonic scale is used exclusively for spiritual applications even in cultures predominated by the harmonic scales.  The pentatonic scale flourishes in American culture through Blues and Gospel music which have African roots.  In all indigenous cultures when invoking the spirits, a falsetto is employed.  This clearly illustrates an emotional relationship between man and spirit and it shows that some spirits are attuned to crying.

Another marked difference in primordial spiritual music is the beat.  Domestic music uses a beat that is to the time of the song that is how children in industrialized cultures are taught to clap hands in school.  Native American music, like African and other aboriginal societies, utilizes the opposite.  Professional drummers from modernized cultures have to unlearn the tendency to clap to time, finding the heartbeat in the background of the song.

In all Lakota spiritual songs and Native American spiritual music the songs start out high and end up low following the natural laws of gravity.  In hearing song birds in nature even when a bird’s song goes high it is always followed by a radical plummet back down again.  Even when the Catholic Church banned the pentatonic scale they still used it along with falsetto  and the high to low intonations for Latin prayer recitations.

It is obvious that the difference in native dance music and others is that the volume is louder and the range is further breaking through the yodel all the way to the other side.  Anyone can do this with practice by building the muscles of the larynx and learning how to relax other muscles at the same time.  Lakota song, like it’s language, are toned from the center of the head rather than from the soft palette.  This gives it a resonant nasal quality.  This is lacking in English where all the sounds are projected out of the mouth with the front of the mouth, unlike primordial languages.  In domestic society we have found changes in human language, our thoughts as well as our habits. An interesting change that has occurred is that the male alto voice types are becoming rarer.  This may be due to hormonal changes related to domestication.

The most important difference in aboriginal music are the origins of the songs.  A song is a gift from the spirits.  A person receives a vision with a gift of the song for the people.  Most all of the native songs have come about in this way and not from regular composition.  This is illustrated by the lyrics which are in first person from the spirit’s standpoint.  This is a very important point to remember because it too defines authentic aboriginal song and is totally absent in industrialized cultures.  A Lot of people find our blog site looking for English sweat lodge songs.  There is no such thing as an English sweat lodge song nor is there such a thing as a Spanish sweat lodge song.  None of the Spanish and English so called Indian songs were gifted by the spirits, these songs were all composed.  None of these contemporary songs are in first person from the spirits point of view.  None of them use falsetto, pentatonic scale, have a back beat or go from high to low.  So if you hear someone singing a song claim to have been a Native American spiritual song yet it is in a harmonic scale do not take them serious.

To recognize a fraudulent song, as you can see, is very simple.  But there are other things that define domestic compositions.  “We all fly like eagles,  high above the earth, circling the universe, with wings of pure light”.  The example begins not only with a fantasy statement but also completely untrue in every way.  It expresses the need to be greater out of a low self esteem which is a distinct character trait of this modern culture.  It is common in the Lakota songs to hear this statement “I am a common man” or “a common man is saying this”.  The most prevalent phrase in Lakota songs is“pity me” (have compassion).  Secondly is “help me” as well as ”God I am suffering”.   This is reflected by most spiritual songs of any traditions regardless of age or culture.

The purpose in making distinctions in spiritual and non spiritual songs is to defend true spirituality without allowing fraudulent mystics to damage the authentic power.  Even if it is done innocently and inadvertently, measures need to be taken to safe keep the ancient traditions of the earth.  In the same way there should never be a drive thru or email confessionals in the church, there should never be bogus Indian songs as part of any sweat lodge.  the reason for this preservation is not to stop the evolution of a native path but to stop the domestication of it.  That de-claws it making it an obedient pet rather than a fierce panther that inspires reverence and change.  It controls the spirit by denying it access to the people, it transforms the medicine power into a badge of honor rather than as a spiritual gift.

2014 Ceremonial Events Calendar

2014 Ceremonial Events Calendar

Please call if you plan on attending events or Email us at conjurespirits@gmail.

April

April 11: Hanbleceya camp (Vision Quest ) in Morelia Mexico.

April 13: Yuwipi (Mexico).

April 26: Hanbleceya ceremonies come to a close.

MAY

Friday 23 : Bear Dance begins in Westfield Wisconsin.

Friday 26 : Bear Dance closes.

JUNE

Sunday 1: Sweat Lodge 9:00 am.

Thursday 5: Hanbleceya camp (Vision Quest ) begins in Crestone colorado. Sweat Lodge at noon.

Friday 6: Second day of Hanbleceya camp. Sweat Lodge at noon.

Saturday 7: Third day of Hanbleceya camp, Sweat Lodge at noon followed by Song ceremony and Yuwipi Ceremony.

Sunday 8: Last day of  Hanbleceya camp, Sweat Lodge at noon.

Saturday 14: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

Sunday 15-22: wounded warrior’s Sun Dance, Moriarti New Mexico.

Saturday 28: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

July 

Friday 4: All night tipi meeting.

Saturday 5: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

Saturday 12: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

sunday 13: womens sweat lodge 11:00 am.

Saturday 19: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

Tuesday 22: wopila inipi 12:00 noon (thank you sweat lodge).

Saturday 26: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

August

Saturday: 9-22 Great Britain.

sunday 10: womens sweat lodge 11:00 am.

Friday 22 : All night tipi meeting, Deer Haven, Oregon.

September

Saturday 6: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

Monday 8: womens sweat lodge 11:00 am.

Saturday 13: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

Friday 19: Hanbleceya camp (Vision Quest ) begins in Crestone colorado. Sweat Lodge at noon.

Saturday 20: Second day of Hanbleceya camp. Sweat Lodge at noon followed by song ceremony 3-5pm and a potluck 5-6pm.

Sunday 21: Third day of Hanbleceya camp, Sweat Lodge at noon followed Yuwipi ceremony.

Monday 22: Last day of  Hanbleceya camp, Sweat Lodge at noon.

Saturday 27: song class 3-5 pm. 5-6 potluck.

October

Wednesday 8: womens sweat lodge 11:00 am.

Thursday 23: mens sweat lodge 4:00 pm.

november

Thursday 6: womens sweat lodge 11:00 am.

Sunday 16: Tree day Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

monday 17-20: Sundance of peace Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

saturday 22-26 star dance Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

December

 

sep oct 2012 045

Events 2013

 Events 2013

June

1 Saturday: Beginning of Singing Stone Hanbleceya (vision quest). 12:00 noon.

2 Sunday: Hanbleceya. Sweat Lodge at 12:00 noon.

3 Monday: Hanbleceya. Sweat Lodge at 12:00 noon.

4 Tuesday: Closing Hanbleceya. Sweat Lodge at 12:00 noon.

5 Wednesday: Singing 4-6 pm

9 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

11 Tuesday: Red Valley Sundance Tree Day. (Dance continues through 20th)

12 Wednesday: Singing 4-6 pm

16 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

19 Wednesday: Zuya Taopi Sundance Tree Day, Moriarty N.M.

20 Thursday: Zuya Taopi Sundance Begins

21 Friday: Zuya Taopi Sundance Continues

22 Saturday: Zuya Taopi Sundance Healing Day

23 Sunday:  Zuya Taopi Sundance Closing and Give Away

26 Wednesday: Wakan Hoye Yapi Sundance Tree Day, White River S.D.

27 Thursday: Wakan Hoye Yapi Sundance Begins

28 Friday: Wakan Hoye Yapi Sundance Continues

29 Saturday: Wakan Hoye Yapi Sundance Healing day

30 Sunday: Wakan Hoye Yapi Sundance Closing and Give Away

July

3 Wednesday: Singing 4-6 pm

7 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

8 Monday: Blue Star Sundance Tree Day, Utah

Tuesday:Blue Star Sundance Begins

10 Wednesday Blue Star Sundance Continues

14 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

21 Sunday:  Singing 2-4 pm

27 Saturday: all night tipi meeting

28 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

31 Wednesday: David  Swallow’s  Sundance, Tree Day

August-September Events

August

11 sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

13 Tuesday: Noon Sweat Lodge

18 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

24 Saturday: All Night Tipi Meeting

28 Wednesday: Camino De Crestone Sweat Lodge

31 Saturday: All Night Tipi Meeting

September

1 Sunday: Noon Sweat Lodge

6 Friday:  Saguache County Pow Wow Pot luck 6:00 pm

7 Saturday: Saguache County Pow Wow. Grand Entry 11:00 am

Click Here: SaguachePowwow

12 Thursday: Arizona Yuwipi

15 Sunday: Singing 2-4 pm

19 Thursday: Vision Quest Camp begins. Sweat at Noon.

20 Friday: Vision Quest Camp Day 2. Sweat at Noon.

21 Saturday: Vision Quest Camp. Sweat Lodge at Noon and Yuwipi Ceremony.

22 Sunday: Vision Quest Camp Day 4. Sweat at Noon. Give away and potluck.

23 Monday: All Night Tipi Meeting

October

Friday 4 : New moon Sweat Lodge 5:30

Sunday 13: Woman’s Sweat Lodge 10 am

Friday 18 : Lunar eclipse Grandmother Medicine Sweat Lodge 6:00 pm

Thursday 31: Halloween. Vision Quest begins in Nayarit Mexico

November

Tuesday 12 – 28 Tamoanchan Nayarit Mexico 

October 31 Opening Ceremony 

November 14 Closing Ceremony Vision Quest

Ceremony November 16 Tree day.

17 to November 20 Sun Dance (Peace Dance).

22 to 26 November Star Dance (ghost dance).

December

Friday 13: Sweat Lodge 6:00 PM

Saturday 21: Miami Florida Tipi Meeting.

Friday 27: Canupa Ceremony.

Saturday 28: Yuwipi Cape Coral.

Tuesday 31: Fort Myers Tipi Meeting.

New Year's Eve 2013

 

Cape Coral Yuwipi

A Blossoming Tradition

 Who practices Modern Indigenous American Traditions?  People from all walks of life and all corners of the globe. Like all good traditions and spiritual practices, they have the tendency to grow. In terms of Native American spirituality, the Lakota traditions have done the best. This is so because the Lakota people have always shared with others, adopted people as family (Hunka) and have always helped others without hatred and judgement. That is why it is a blossoming tradition. The Navajo have had a hard time generating interest among their youth in the practice of traditional ceremonies. Since they have been reluctant to pass there sacred ways outside of their own blood relatives they have suffered the total extinction of many important rites in very resent years. Nowadays the Navajo are related to every race on earth and come from all walks of life. Like most nations of the earth, a small percentage of them are involved in Lakota ceremonials!

There is this illusion that indigenous traditions must remain unchanged, like the anthropologist frowning over the Sun Dance Chief taking flesh offerings with a surgical scalpel instead of a flint knife. The anthropologist has totally missed the point and cannot see the practicality, wisdom, and level of detachment inherent in non-domestic spirituality (attachment and sentimentality are enhanced in domesticated animals).

The true indigenous spiritual leaders have the same ethics and humility as most of the world religions. In the first century, Christianity immediately spread from being Jewish to embracing Greeks, Ethiopians and any one else that expressed an interest, this is a natural phenomenon that can be seen everywhere. The Catholic Pope is nether Jewish, Greek, or Italian right now he’s of American Indian heritage! One might argue that Native spirituality cannot be compared to Christianity even though it is the chosen path of most Native Americans. Others would say that in the story of Christianity the Jews represented the good traditionalist, staying in line with the sacred ways. Nothing could be further from the truth because the Jewish tradition has always been open to the public. People all faiths continuously convert to Judaism and always have. It is not uncommon for a man to undergo a circumcision operation in the hopes of becoming admitted to Judaism. Like the Navajo they too are international, global citizens!

Like all paths to God, you’ll find a Catholic and Protestant versions of all of them. There are the purist fundamentalists, the spirit filled ones in rapture, as well as closet atheists who think they are spiritual because they are part of a religion. All of them play important roles as it truly takes all kinds!

Black Bear

We are constantly reminded at our ceremonial functions of the strange circumstances of the changing world in which we live. There are a lot of misconceptions about spirituality in general and folks these days have allot of different motives for being involved. It is up to us that the coming generations not pollute indigenous ways by making them domesticated. This has been what has hurt the worlds greatest spiritual paths more than any thing else. Domestication is warping our perception, the only thing we take with us beyond this life!

What makes Indigenous traditions, of any kind, so powerful is that they are wild and untamed. They access that part of the human psyche that is unmolested by industrialization.  It is ever important for the human race to hold on to the magic that is swiftly receding away from us. Many new age philosophies would disagree with this, but let me point out that they are a strictly domesticated variety of human beings. When any animal is domesticated, or even when wild animals are caged or subjected to routines, they tend to slip into neurotic behavior patterns, like living in a made up fantasy world.

Many do not realize that the Lakota Sun Dance is an international religion, for example. There has emerged many powerful medicine men and spiritual leaders representing Lakota traditions from the world over. Many people are against this (mostly nonspiritual people).  It is truly mysterious how the spirit moves, a person may acquire spirit helpers through association with a tradition, through marriage, by ordination and by birth. Sometimes it runs in the family as was the case with Daniel Dunglas Home and Carlos Mirabelli. There is also the case where someone is born with miraculous powers outside of spiritual tradition altogether.

220px-Daniel-Dunglas-Home-levitation

There are hundreds of cases of human foot prints fossilized in stone, any where from 1 million to 90 million years old, a testimony to the awesome mystery of human kind and what lurks deep within our human consciousness. Modern Indigenous American Spirituality is in constant flux as we our selves are redefined by what we know, and that goes for all of spirituality, everywhere!

Only the last remaining indigenous traditions of the world still have miraculous, seemingly impossible things as commonplace. Spiritual leaders of domestic religion, sadly, cannot begin to imagine the reality of  the aboriginal spiritual world (whats left of it).

Ceremonial songs in the Lakota language

Spirit  Helpers
Spirit Helpers

Welcome to the Song page

We are currently teaching many songs in the Lakota language to support Ceremonies such as the Sundance, Yuwipi/Lowanpi, Inipi (Sweat Lodge), and Ghost Dance. Ongoing Ceremonial Song Classes and other events are all listed on our Calendar of events. There is a strong need for more singers so we encourage anyone interested to join us. Lyrics to other songs are also at the bottom of the page.

The Singing Stone would like to invite you to our Song Classes. Our song Classes are in the Lakota language and take place most every Saturday 3-5 p.m.in Crestone, Colorado. This is followed by a pot-luck. Please email for directions and to check availability. We also do a crafting circle before singing 1-3 P.M. Our email is conjurespirits@gmail.com . We look forward to singing together. Aho Mitakuye Oyasin!

White Buffalo Calf Woman Song

Oyate wamayanka po! Oyate wamayanka po! Le canunpa ki le wakan yelo, Oyate wamayanka po!

Oyate wamayanka po! Oyate wamayanka po! Le canunpa ki le wakan yelo Oyate wamayanka po!

Oyate wamayanka po! Oyate wamayanka po! Le canunpa ki le wakan yelo Oyate wamayanka po!

Oyate wamayanka po! Oyate wamayanka po! Le canunpa ki le wakan yelo Oyate yanipi ktelo!

People you must look at me! People you must look at me!, This Pipe before you, it is sacred.

People you must look at me!, People you must look at me!, People you must look at me!

This Pipe before you, it is sacred., People you must look at me!, People you must look at me!

People you must lood at me!, This Pipe before you, it is sacred., People you shall live!

 Sweat Lodge Stone song

 Spotted Eagle song

Miye toka heya anpetu owakinyelo

Wanbli gleska wan heyaya u welo

Miye toka heya anpetu owakinyelo

As the sun rises, I am first to fly

A spotted eagle is coming saying this

As the sun rises, Iam first to fly

 Animal calling song

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo,

Wankantanhan wanbli gleska oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye.

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo.

Makata sinte sapela oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye.

Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo. Tuwa tokiya kola wayelo.

Wankantanhan wahe oyate wan, Kola wica wayelo, sitomniyan wanmayank u ye

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From above, a spotted eagle nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From the earth, a black tailed deer nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

Somewhere, someone is my friend. Somewhere, someone is my friend.

From above, a mole nation, do not doubt his power, he is my friend, Everyone behold! He comes to see me.

 Black Tail Deer Song 2

Maka kic’un pi, maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’in pi,

tuwa eheha wayelo, Maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’un pi, tuwa eheha wayelo

They wear their earth, they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth.

Someone I have made say they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth.

 Spider song

Maka sitomniyan, okiya wau yelo, Iktomi wan heyaya uwelo, Miye mawakan yelo.

Maka sitomniyan, okiya wau yelo, Iktomi wan heyaya uwelo, Miye mawakan yelo.

All over this world I come to help, a spider says these things as he comes, Me, I am sacred.

All over this world I come to help, a spider says these things as he comes, Me, I am sacred.

 Prayer song

Tunkasila Wakan Tanka heya hoye wayelo, Tunkasila Wakan Tanka heya hoye wayelo.

 Tunkasila omakiyayo makakijelo.

Grandfather, Great Spirit, a voice I am sending, Grandfather, Great Spirit, a voice I am sending.

Grandfather, help me for I am suffering.

 Kettle dog song

leceya sunka wan yuta pe, leceya sunka wan yuta pelo, wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan

sunka wan yutape wakan yutapelo

 Stone Calling Song

Hoyemakiyayo cemakiyayo, Taku ya chinkia iyece tu ktelo, Tunkan sabicya eya ce hoye wakiyelo.

Cemakiyayo hoyemakiyayo, Taku ya chinkia iyece tu ktelo, Tunkan sabicya eya ce hoye wakiyelo.

Send a voice to me, pray to me, What you want will be given to you, A blackened stone, you have said, So a voice I send to you.

Pray to me, send a voice to me, What you want will be given to you, A blackened stone, you have said, So a voice I send to you.

This is The Singing Stone’s Yuwipi set in the order that they are sung.

1. Pipe Filling Song

Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Canunpa wanji yuha ilatake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

 Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Hocoka wanji yuha ilotake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

English

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like, this My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

With this one Sacred Pipe sit down.

Remember as you fill the pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

In this one Sacred Circle sit down.

Remember as you fill your pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

Español

Mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi

Cuando se hace haci los abuelos bajan a verte

Con esta pipa sagrada siéntate

Recuerda que cuando llenas tu pipa

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede

Mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi, mi amigo haslo asi

Cuando se hace así, los abuelos bajan a verte

Con esta pipa sagrada siéntate

Recuerda que cuando llenas tu pipa

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede

2. Song To Tie

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo, Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo,

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo ,Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo.

English

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me,

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me.

Espanol

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece

3. Yuwipi Altar song Is learned in person and should never be sung outside of ceremony.

4. Stone Song 1

Wakan oyate wan waniyang u ktelo, Wayankaya yo.

English

A sacred nation is appearing, Come and see.

Espanol

Una nación sagrada se levanta ven a ver.

5. Stone Song 2

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

English

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Espanol

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que has visto

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que has visto

6. Black Tail Deer Song

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo, Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

English

This is me visible I am standing, This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

Espanol

Este soy yo, visible, aquí de pie. Este soy yo, visible, aquí  de pie.

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

Este soy yo, visible aquí de pie

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

7. Mole Song

Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo, Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo.

Wahehela wan u welo, Wani yanku yelo.

Taku wakan wan echela, Wana u welo, Wana e yelo, Wani yanku welo.

English

From the earth something sacred is coming, From the earth something sacred is coming.

A mole is coming, It is coming to see you.

There is nothing not sacred, He is coming, He is here, It is coming to see you.

Espanol

Desde la tierra algo sagrado viene. Desde la tierra algo sagrado viene

Un topo viene., viene a verte.

No hay nada, que no sea sagrado, el viene, el esta aqui, viene a verte.

8. Bat Song

Hanhepi ki mita wayelo wayankiye yo, Hupakiglake wan heya u welo.

English

The night belongs to me  look this way, A bat has come, saying this.

Espanol

La noche me pertenece mira hacia aca,  Un murciélago ha venido diciendo esto.

9. Prayer Song

Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

Makasitomniyan hoye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

English

Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say

All over the world a voice I send, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say.

Espanol

Escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir

En todo el mundo una voz  envío, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir, escucha lo que tengo que decir.

10. Doctoring Song

Wanktahan wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo,Wanktahan wau welo,

Wicatancan piya ,wakaginkta ca wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo.

English

Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming.

A body I am going to make well, so I am coming, Up above I am coming.

Espanol

Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo,

Un cuerpo voy a hacer bien, haci yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo.

11. Aurora Borealis Song

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo, Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo,

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

English

The aurora borealis this is me, The aurora borealis this is me

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

The aurora borealis this is me,

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

Espanol

La aurora borealis, este soy yo, La aurora borealis, este soy yo

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora

La aurora borealis, este soy yo

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora

12. Stone Doctoring Song

Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

Tunkan tatioblecha wan, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tip i ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

English

Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

The lodge of the stones, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

Dentro de las  chispas brilladoras yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

El temascal de piedras, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

13. Medicine Song

Pejuta wan cicu ktaca wayankiyeyo.

English

A medicine I am going to give you, look this way.

Espanol

Una medicina te voy a dar, mira hacia aca.

14. Spider Song

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo

English

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Espanol

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la escuchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la escuchame.

  • Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibela escuchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se escucha, recibe la  escuchame.

15. Spider Song 2

Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo, tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

Tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

English

A spider comes walking, He comes walking, he comes walking,              A spider comes walking.

He comes walking, he comes walking, A spider comes walking.

Espanol

Una araña viene caminando, el viene caminando, el viene caminando.

Una araña viene caminando.

el viene caminando, el viene caminando Una arana viene caminando.

16. Thunder Being Song 1

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo.

English

Over here they are calling for me, Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation., My friends are calling for me.

Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation, My friends are calling for me.

Espanol

Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Desde el oeste una nación de seres relámpago, Mis amigos llaman por mi.

Por aqui estan llamando por mi,  Desde el oeste una nación de seres relámpago Mis amigos llaman por mi.

17. Thunder Being Song 2

Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

Tehi ya wamiconza pe, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

English

People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

A difficult time is predicted for me, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

Espanol

Gente muévase  hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muévase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

Un tiempo difícil  esta predecido para mi, Gente muévase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

18. Thunder Being Song 3

Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo

He wamakaskan wanji gyi Cante eiyapa wayelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo.

English

Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first.

I make some animals’ hearts beat, Over here I walk first.

Espanol

Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero.   

 Yo hago que  lata  el corazón  de algunos animales, Por aqui yo camino primero.

19. Thunder Being Song 4

Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lowan, Makasitomniya kola ceyakiya pelo wan, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lo .

English

Up above something sacred you have seen, Up above something sacred you have seen, All around the world you have prayed to him, Up above something sacred you have seen.

Espanol

En lo alto algo sagrado has visto, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto,

En todo el mundo has rezado por él, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto.

20. Calling Song

Tunkasila wamayank uye, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo

Ikce wicasa ta canunpa wan Yuha hoye wayelo

Mitakuye ob wani ktelo, Heyaya hoye wayelo.

English

Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me.

With the common people’s pipe I send a voice

So I may live with my relatives, I keep sending a voice.

Espanol

Abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme.

Con la pipa del pueblo, Yo mando una voz.

Par así  vivir con todas mis relaciones, Yo sigo mandando una voz.

21. Sone Song 3

Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo

Wankata inyan wan, Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo.

English

Voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Up above a stone, voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Espanol

Voces se escuchan, voces se escuchan, desde lo alto se escuchan voces, voces se escuchan, desde lo alto se escuchan voces, voces se escuchan

por encima de una piedra

22. Spider Untying Song (1)

Cokata wankan y mica kta ca, Cokata eya ya nawajin yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo.

English

He is preparing a sacred center for me, I am standing in the center sending a voice, My friend, you have said this, do it this way, My friend, you have said this, do it this way.

Espanol

El prepara un centro sagrado para mi, Estoy parado en el centro mandando una voz, Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, hazlo de esta forma, Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, hazlo de esta forma.

23. Dancing Song

Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

Inyan wasicun ca ,waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

English

Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

The white stone spirits, take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

Espanol

Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando,

Los espíritus  de piedra blanca, ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando.

24. Pipe Offering Song

Wayankiye, wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

Wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

English

Take a look, Take a look, Take a look,This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Take a look, Take a look, This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Espanol

Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Esta pipa es sagrada, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista,  Esta pipa es sagrada.

25. Offering Song

Lenake, wayang u yelo, Lenake hiyo uye

Waunye ki lena hoye miciciyiyo He mitakuye ob wani wacin yelo, Tunkasila omakiyayo.

Canli pahta ki lena hoye miciciyiyo, He mitakuye ob zaniya waon wacin yelo Tunkasila omakiyayo.

English

Look, all of these I have given you, Come take what I have offered you

With this cloth I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives I want to live, Grandfather help me.

With these tobacco ties I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives in good health I will live, Grandfather, help me.

Espanol

Mira todo esto que te e dado, Ven a coger lo que te e ofrecido

Con esta manta me ofresco hacia ti, Con mis relativos quiero vivir, Abuelo ayudame

Con estos amarres de tabacco me ofresco hacia ti . Con mis relativos en buena salud voy vivir, abuelo ayudame

26. Offering Song 2

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

Ikce wicasa ta canunpi ki leyuha, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

English

Sending a voice, sending a voice, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

A common man is holding this pipe, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

Espanol

Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este día

Un hombre común  aguanta una pipa, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este dia

 

27. Closing Song 1

Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, He mitakuye ob wani kta ca, Lena cicu welo.

English

Stone spirits have pity on us, Stone spirits have pity on us, With my relatives I will live, So I give you these offerings

Espanol

Espíritus  de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Espíritus de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Con toda relaciones yoy a vivir haci te ofresco todo esto

28. Closing Song 2

Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Tunkasila ta wokonze ca, Lena cicu welo. Hot aninyan kin najin pelo.

English

As we leave our voices are heard, As we leave our voices are heard, It is Grandfather’s will, That I give you these offerings. As we leave our voices are heard.

Espanol

Mientras partimos, nuestras voces se escuchan, Mientras partimos,nuestras voces se escuchan, Es la voluntad de el Abuelo, Que te doy estas ofrendas, Mientras partimos, nuestras voces se escuchan.

 29. Ending Song

Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo, Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

Anpetu okihica cicu welo, Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

English

My friend, I have given you these. Behold them, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

The day has made it possible to give you these offerings, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

Espanol

Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

El dia ha hecho  posible poder darte estas ofrendas, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

click here for a lyrics download (Microsoft word)

 

Ceremonial songs in the Lakota language and lakota sweat lodge song lyrics

Important Details
When singing this style of song, be sure to pay close attention to the drumbeat. It is either a fast steady beat or a slow thunder beat, like a heartbeat. Some of these songs are hard to play without the right beat. When singing along it is helpful to tap along with the drum. Another point of consideration is distinguishing between vocables and lyrics. Vocables are sounds and are not written among the lyrics. Usually the syllable and melody of the vocables match the lyrical part of the song. Usually the song begins with vocables. Very rarely are the vocables after the words.

When singing alone or without accompaniment you would sing the songs the way they are written. When singing with others you would use a call and response. That is when the song leader calls out the first line of the song; the group would then repeat that line. Some of these recordings have a call and response although they are written without it. As a rule of thumb with the call and response the group joins in just before the leader sings the vocable sound He. This sound is found at the end of some of the sentences He.

Other things to consider in singing these songs

Some of these songs are specific to particular lineages. In that case only one or two words may be different from one tiospaye to another. Most of these songs are general and are sung by many groups and at different ceremonies. An animal calling song is for calling in the power of specific animals. A stone song is for calling in the powers of stones. Be sure you are not calling things unnecessarily.

These songs are very powerful and not to be idly whistled or sung in the shower. Put down a pinch of tobacco as an offering first. This can be placed in a special spot, it can be rubbed or sprinkled upon the drum. A little water is good for the spirit of the drum, but before singing songs always put down tobacco. It is important not to “cry wolf” with the spirits. If these songs are sung idly too much the Spirits may stop responding.

By learning songs from a C.D. or computer they may attract lesser nearby spirits. They may not have the same impact until they are sung along within a genuine tradition. The more powerful spirits follow an oral line of association that is lost without actual contact with lineage holders. By singing and learning these songs here the spirits may eventually draw you into the ceremonies and traditions that use them.

Do not sing any thunder being songs at night out of context. This will attract ghosts, it could be very dangerous. Thunder being songs call thunder beings during the day and ghosts at night. Honestly, one should never really sing any kind of song carelessly outside at night. In the event of attracting ghosts sing the “Sending the Spirits Home” closing song. It is good to know that song to send spirits back home, especially when it is helpful to them. Thunder being songs include any heyoka or kettle songs. The dog song should only be sung at the Kettle Dance unless practicing.

Healing songs are for doctoring people. The songs themselves are a healing medicine. They can be sung in sweat lodge, Yuwipi, or on their own as a treatment. Canupa songs (pipe songs) should generally be sung when the pipe is present. If you carry a canupa it is O.K. to sing those songs whenever but always give a tobacco offering to the drum, especially when rehearsing. Pipe filling songs should only be sung while loading the pipe facing west. Again it is alright in the process of learning to sing the pipe filling songs, having offered tobacco to the drum and ending your lessons with the “Sending the Spirits Home” closing song.
There are various different closing songs when reaching near the end of a ceremony. For instance, in the fourth round of the sweat lodge one might sing a closing offering song. Be sure to check with your leaders about this as they vary from tradition to tradition. Some of our closing songs may not be used by other lineages to close. It all depends on what the spirit helpers of a tradition are used to. When visiting a sweat lodge you know little about it would be safest to not lead any closing songs at all.

There are a handful of songs not available here that are too specific. These are the opening Yuwipi/Lowanpi songs for calling in the directional spirits. They vary from ceremony to ceremony and from one medicine man to another. To get these songs you will have to learn them in ceremony. That is the only time those songs are ever sung. By learning all of these songs on our site we will become a Lowan Wicasa (song man) or a Lowan Winyan (song woman). Although not a prerequisite to being a medicine man or woman in the Lakota tradition you would have to be crazy to even attempt to embark on that path without most of these songs. Singers are integral to these ways, anyone knowing all of these songs are needed and honored regardless of race, creed, or color. If you put yourself out there you could travel the world over with expenses paid just singing at ceremonial events.

Sundance coyote song

kola lemiyeca he wau welo, kola lemiyeca he wau welo,

wama yanka yo wau welo, anpe wi ki iyoh’late he

ociciya kinte ca he wau welo, wama yanka yo wau welo wau welo,

kola lemiyeca he wau welo, kola lemiyeca he wau welo,

wama yanka yo wau welo, hanhe wi ki iyoh’late he

ociciya kinte ca he wau welo, wama yanka yo wau welo wau welo.

My friend, this is me that is coming, My friend, this is me that is coming

Look at me, I am coming, Under the sun, I have something to say

I have something to tell you, that is why, Look at me, I am coming

My friend, this is me that is coming, My friend, this is me that is coming

Look at me, I am coming, Under the moon, I have something to say

I have something to tell you, that is why, Look at me, I am coming

Stone Song 

Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo, Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo.

Tunkasila wamayanguye, Makasitomniyan hoye wayelo.

All around the earth I am sending a voice, All around the earth I am sending a voice.

Grandfather hear me, All around the earth I am sending a voice.

Pipe Song

Maka cokayan canunpa wan ahi unpahpelo wayankiyeyo,Hecaya uha hoye wayelo.

Thank you Song

Wakan tanka tunkasila, Wakan tanka tunkasila, Pilamaya yelo, Canunpa wakan ca mayaku welo, Pilamaya yelo, Wicozani wa mayaku welo, Pilamayaye pilamaya yelo.

Canunpa wakan ca mayaku welo, Pilamaya yelo, Wicozani wa mayaku welo, Pilamayaye pilamaya yelo.

Great Spirit, grandfather, Great Spirit, grandfather, I thank you, You have given me a sacred canunpa, Thank you, You have given me a good healing, Thank you, thank you.

You have given me a sacred canunpa, Thank you, You have given me a good healing, Thank you, thank you.

Heyoka Thunder Being Song:

Makpiya mimemeya canku yape, Makpiya mimemeya canku yapelo, Henake akicita pica winyan wakan a canku yapelo.

Makpiya mimemeya canku yape, Henake akicita pica taku wakan a canku yapelo.

Clouds circling is their road, Clouds circling is their road, They are warriors, upon a road around a sacred woman.

Clouds circling is their road, They are warriors, upon a road around a sacred thing.

Hanbleceya Song 1

Tekiya wahi najin yelo, Tekiya wahi najin yelo, kola wamayankiyo.

Tekiya wahi najin yelo kola wamayankiyo.

Wiohpeyata kiya hoye wayelo kola wamayankiyo, Tekiya wahi najin yelo kola wamayankiyo

With difficulity I am standing, With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

A voice I have sent to the West, friend take a look at me.

With difficulty I am standing, friend take a look at me.

Prayer Song

Makpia tipiwa ogna micagelo helo, Tunkashila ehapikun lecanu we

A dwelling in the clouds, he has made for me, Grandfather you have said and done this.

Ghost Nation Song

Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo, Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo, Tuwa tokiya kola lowanpelo.

Anpo hinapeki itokabya tuwa Lowanpe hena ehapi ca, Kola lowanpelo.

Somewhere my friends they are singing, Somewhere my friends they are singing, Somewhere my friends they are singing

They have said this, My friends they are singing

Prayer Song

Hoksila wamayankayo, hoksila wamayankayo, Miyohan wan wakanca wanji koyag Cinktelo, anpe wikiheyaca kola wayelo.

Child, take a look at me, child take a look at me, My power I have made you wear in a sacred manner ,The sun has said this, so I am his friend.

Doctoring Song

Ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye, Winyan ta canupi ki, ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Winyan ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Ga glinajin miye Ikce wicasa ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

Ikce wicasa ta canupi ki ga glinajin miye, Ga glinajin miye.

It has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

a woman’s pipe had made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

A woman’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it It has made me stand before it.

The common man’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

The common man’s pipe has made me stand before it, It has made me stand before it.

Prayer Song

Wankantanka unsimala yo, He makakijelo, Canupa kile he uha hoye wayelo

Wankantanka unsimalayo, He makakijelo, Canupa kile he uha hoye wayelo

Great Spirit have pity on me, For I am suffering, This pipe I have prayed with

Great Spirit have pity on me, For I am suffering, This pipe I have prayed with

Stone Song

Inyan wan hinajin wayanka piye

Before you a stone I have made appear. Come and see.

Black Tail Deer Song
Maka kic’un pi, maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’in pi,

tuwa eheha wayelo, Maka kic’un pi, sinte sapela maka kic’un pi, tuwa eheha wayelo

They wear their earth, they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth

Someone I have made say they wear their earth, black tail deer wear their earth

Stone Song

Hokaowin u welo, Hokaowin u welo, Inyanwan wakan yankina, wana Hokaowin u welo

Hokaowin u welo wakanyan u welo

It is coming around, It is coming around, A stone in a sacred manner, Now it is coming around

In a sacred manner it is coming.

Doctoring Song

Inajin yo he waniyankinte,Tunkashila he waniyankintelo, Inajin yo he waniyankintelo.

Inajin yo he waniyankinte, Tunkashila he waniyankintelo, Inajin yo he waniyankintelo.

Stand up, he is going to take a look at you, Grandfather is going to take a look at you, Stand up, he is going to take a look at you.

Stand up, he is going to take a look at you, Grandfather is going to take a look at you, Stand up, he is going to take a look at you.

 

Hanbleceya song

kola kawinga yo ehapelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo. wiohpeyata inawajina ahitun nawajin yelo, kola kawinga yo ehapelo.

my friend turn around you have said,my friend turn around you have said, my friend turn around you have said.to the west I stand looking toward you, my friend turn around you have said.

 

Der Singende Stein

Der singende Stein ist eine spirituelle Organisation, die sich für die Erhaltung unserer heimischen Erbe. Es ist eine Ehre und eine Freude, diese alte Linie für alle zu teilen, um die mächtige Wiedergeburt der Magie durch diese Weisen beispielhaft zu erleben. Man kann von der wahren Indigene amerikanischen Traditionen in unzählige Möglichkeiten profitieren, durch das Erlernen von Songs in der Sprache der Lakota, durch die Teilnahme an der Schwitzhütte Zeremonie Chanupa (heilige Pipe), Yuwipi Ritus Hanbleceya (Vision Quest), Rite de Passage, Sun Dance, Bear Dance, sowie die All Night Tipi Meeting Indischen Zeremonien.

Wir heißen Sie herzlich willkommen, um die tiefe spirituelle Reichtum haben wir zu bieten hat. Lernen Sie von spirituellen Führern, Ältesten, Heiler und Lakota Chiefs über pflanzliche Medizin, Geistes lore, Frau Weisheit und vor allem über sich. Entdecken Sie die innere Kraft und verborgene Potenziale aus sich selbst durch Tanz, Gesang, Ritual und Kunst.

Wir sind ein Ort der Anbetung, Heilung, Lernen und Leistung. Wenn Sie ernsthaft über das Lernen und engagieren sich im Roten Weg oder wollen einfach Indigene amerikanische Zeremonie erleben Kontaktieren Sie uns, Sie in unserem Kalender für Veranstaltungen, Retreats und Kurse für eine gute Zeit für einen Besuch (siehe unsere Location-Seite). Der singende Stein reist viel in Amerika, mit uns über Veranstaltungen in Ihrer Nähe!

Der singende Stein ist ein heiliger Ort für die Aufbewahrung der alten indigenen Lakota Möglichkeiten, für das ewige Feuer, das in allen Völkern ‘Herz, die Flamme, die den Geist dieses Landes entfacht brüllt, Brennen, die Illusion von uns. Durch seine knisternden Stimme, rät Großvater Feuer uns mit seiner Wärme, Lehr Respekt vor der Tradition und Demut, mit Macht.

Wir sind ein Haus des bescheidenen Stein, das Tipi eines singenden Felsen, wo Großmutter Erde, Unci Maka, singt die Lieder der Weisheit fast verloren. Sie erzählt uns die Geschichten aus uns selbst, der White Buffalo Calf Maiden und dem Geheimnis, das sie trägt in ihrem heiligen Medizin-Bundle. Sie flüstert die Lehren der Little People und andere Dinge unergründlich der industrialisierten Geist. Sie atmet in uns der heilige Atem des Lebens, pfiff durch unsere Röhrenknochen die Stürme der unattachment, der tadellose Wind unserer Vorfahren und der anbrechenden Wissen von einem hellen neuen Welt.

Innerhalb dieser Loge des heiligen Atem des Lebens fließt das geheimnisvolle weibliche Kraft des Universums sich. Ihre Lehre Blumen aus der menschlichen Seele, seine wortlose Seiten blühenden stille Weisheit, langsam entfaltenden die Blütenblätter unseres Herzens. Ihr Duft driftet von einem Kreis ohne Ende, ein ewiges Hoop von Traditionen, die wir für alle unsere Beziehungen pflegen. Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! Alle von uns, wir sind verwandt.

Wir sind eine Gruppe von Mitarbeitern, die in vielen verschiedenen Bereichen des Lebens. Am Fuße der Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Crestone, Colorado, haben wir das Glück, diese alte spirituelle Linie in einer solchen Ehrfurcht und einige magische Einstellung teilen. Wir arbeiten mit vielen Lakota Spirituelle Führer wie Steven Bluehorse, Robert Kohel, Chef Harold Whitehorse Thompson, George Kickingbear Miller, und Aurelio Diaz Tekpankalli angegliedert. Der singende Stein ist Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan norteamericana, sind wir der steigenden Adler und der nördlichen Wurzel des Baums des Lebens.

 

Hier in der Heimat der singende Stein wimmelt die Magie mal unsägliches. Ein Geheimnis, das unergründliche der modernen anylitical Geist ist. Es mag zu trotzen wissenschaftlichen Prozess oder Kontrolle jeglicher Art. Es ist eine alte Verbindung mit Geistern weit älter als die menschliche Sprache. Der singende Stein ist der Erhaltung einige der letzten Verbindungen zu diesen Geist Helfer der Menschheit auf der westlichen Hemisphäre gewidmet. Wir tun dies durch die Vermittlung zeremonielle Lieder in der Sprache der Lakota, durch die Erhaltung indigenen amerikanischen spirituellen Praktiken und durch die Sicherung der Integrität dieser heiligen Riten.

Wir haben einen Punkt in der Geschichte der Menschheit erreicht, wenn unzählige Traditionen gefallen sind Opfer der Verdünnung der Domestikation. In diesen Zeiten Religionen wurden von ihrer ursprünglichen Kraft de-Krallen, so dass viele Linien stehen als bloße Hülle von dem, was sie verwendet werden.

Dies ist nicht Spekulation, sondern eine Tatsache, die gemessen und gezählt werden. Mit dem Aufstieg der industriellen Revolution gab es einen dramatischen Rückgang in der heiligen Zeit und eine verheerende Zunahme banalen Zeit. Dasselbe wurde mit Platz seiner selbst aufgetreten. Wir kommen alle aus Traditionen, die große Bereiche als besonders heilige Ehre gekommen und wir hatten alle heiligen Stätten in unseren Häusern. Jetzt heiligen Raum ist die Kirche Gebäude beschränkt, wobei der Rest der Erde als durch Wissenschaft de-sacrilized gesehen.

In unserer modernen Kultur, die wir in Unglauben bedingt sind, werden wir von einem frühen Alter, dass bestimmte Dinge glauben zu machen, erzählte und begrenzt somit unsere Wahrnehmung der anylitical Geist.
Es ist das Ziel von The Singing Stone unserer alten Linie erhalten und wir freuen uns über alle, die ernsthaft Suchenden auf dieser guten roten unterwegs sind.

Wer Indigene amerikanische Traditionen praktiziert? Menschen aus allen Bereichen des Lebens und allen Ecken der Welt. wie alle Traditionen und spirituellen Praktiken, haben sie die Tendenz zu wachsen. Im Hinblick auf die Spiritualität der amerikanischen Ureinwohner, haben die Lakota Tradition das beste getan. Dies ist so, weil die Menschen immer Lakota mit anderen Menschen als Familie verabschiedet (Hunka) geteilt haben und immer andere, ohne Hass und Urteil geholfen. Die Navajo haben eine harte Zeit erzeugende Interesse bei der Jugend in der Praxis der traditionellen Zeremonien. Da sie gezögert, es passieren heiligen Auswege Seite ihrer eigenen Blutsverwandten sie die völlige Vernichtung von vielen wichtigen Riten erlitten haben, haben in sehr übel Jahren. Heutzutage ist das Navajo sind jedem Rennen auf der Erde verwandt und kommen aus allen Bereichen des Lebens. Wie die meisten Nationen der Erde sind ein kleiner Prozentsatz von ihnen in Lakota Zeremonien beteiligt!

Es ist diese Illusion, dass die indigenen Traditionen unverändert bleiben muss, wie der Anthropologe stirnrunzelnd über das Sundance Chef unter Fleisch-Angebote mit einem chirurgischen Skalpell anstelle eines Messer aus Feuerstein. die anthro hat ganz den Punkt verpasst und kann nicht sehen, die Praktikabilität, Weisheit, und das Niveau der Ablösung inhärent nicht-häuslichen Spiritualität (Befestigung und Sentimentalität sind domestizierte Tiere verbessert).

Die wahren indigenen spirituellen Führer haben die gleichen Ethik und Demut, da die meisten der Weltreligionen. Im ersten Jahrhundert, Christentum verbreitete sich von sofort als Jude zu umarmen Griechen, Äthiopier und jemand anderes, das ihr Interesse bekundet, dies ist ein natürliches Phänomen, das überall zu sehen sind. Die katholische Papst Unterwelt jüdischen, griechischen oder italienischen Recht jetzt ist er der indianischen Erbe! Man könnte argumentieren, dass Einheimische Spiritualität kann nicht zum Christentum verglichen werden, obwohl es der eingeschlagene Weg der meisten Native Americans ist. Einige würden sagen, dass in der Geschichte des Christentums die Juden die gute traditionalistischen vertreten, bleiben im Einklang mit den heiligen Weisen. Nichts könnte weiter von der Wahrheit entfernt, denn die jüdische Tradition war schon immer offen für die Öffentlichkeit. Menschen aller Glaubensrichtungen kontinuierlich zum Judentum konvertieren und immer. Es ist nicht ungewöhnlich für einen Mann eine Beschneidung Betrieb in der Hoffnung, zu deren Zulassung zum Judentum zu unterziehen. Wie der Navajo auch sie sind international, Weltbürger!

Wie alle Wege zu Gott, du wirst eine katholische und evangelische Versionen aller von ihnen zu finden, gibt es die puristische Fundamentalisten, der Geist gefüllt diejenigen in Verzückung, als auch Atheisten, wer sie sind, weil sie geistige Teil einer Religion sind zu denken. Alle von ihnen spielen eine wichtige Rolle, wie es dauert wirklich alle Arten!

Wir sind ständig auf, unsere zeremonielle Funktionen erinnert, an die seltsamen Umstände des verändernden verändernden Welt in der wir leben. es gibt eine Menge Missverständnisse über Spiritualität im Allgemeinen und die Leute haben in diesen Tagen zuzuteilen verschiedene Motive für sein beteiligt. Es liegt an uns, dass die kommenden Generationen nicht verschmutzen einheimischen Arten, indem sie domestiziert. Das war, was die Welten größte spirituelle Pfade mehr als irgend etwas anderes zu verletzen, ist es Verwerfungen unserer Wahrnehmung, das einzige, was wir mit uns über dieses Leben!

was macht Indigene Traditionen jeglicher Art, so mächtig ist, dass sie sind wild und ungezähmt. Sie greifen auf, dass ein Teil der menschlichen Psyche, die unbehelligt durch die Industrialisierung ist Es ist immer wichtig für die menschliche Rasse zu halten, um die Magie, die schnell zurückweichenden wird von uns entfernt. Viele New Age Philosophien wäre damit nicht einverstanden, aber lassen Sie mich darauf hinweisen, dass sie eine streng domestiziert Vielzahl von Menschen sind. Wenn ein Tier domestiziert, oder sogar, wenn wilde Tiere eingesperrt sind oder unterworfen Routinen ist, neigen sie dazu, in neurotische Verhaltensweisen schlüpfen, wie das Leben in einer Fantasy-Welt bildete.

Viele wissen nicht, dass die Lakota Sundance eine internationale Religion ist, zum Beispiel. es hat viele starke Medizin Männer und spirituelle Führer, die Lakota Traditionen aus der ganzen Welt entstanden. Viele Menschen sind gegen diese (meist nichtgeistige Personen). Es ist wirklich mysteriös, wie der Geist bewegt, kann eine Person Geist Helfer durch die Verbindung mit einer Tradition zu erwerben, durch Heirat, durch die Weihe und durch Geburt, wenn es in der Familie läuft wie es der Fall mit Daniel Dunglas Home. Es ist auch der Fall, wo jemand mit wunderbaren Kräften außerhalb der spirituellen Tradition geboren wird insgesamt.

Es gibt Hunderte von Fällen von menschlichen Fußspuren in Stein erstarrt, wo jeder von 1.000.000 bis 90.000.000 Jahre alt, ein Zeugnis für die großartige Geheimnis der menschlichen Art und was verbirgt sich tief in unserem menschlichen Bewusstseins. Moderne Indigene amerikanische Spiritualität ist in ständiger Bewegung, wie wir uns selbst durch das, was wir wissen müssen neu definiert werden, und das gilt für alle von Spiritualität, überall!

Nur die letzten verbliebenen indigenen Traditionen der Welt immer noch wunderbare, scheinbar unmögliche Dinge als alltäglich. Geistliche Führer der heimischen Religion, traurig, kann nicht anfangen, die Realität der Ureinwohner geistigen Welt (was ist davon übrig ist) vorstellen.

Indigenous amerikanske tradisjoner

The Singing Stone er en åndelig organisasjon dedikert til å bevare vår opprinnelige arv. Det er en ære og en glede å dele denne gamle avstamning for alle å oppleve den mektige gjenfødelse av magi eksemplifisert ved disse måtene. Man kan dra nytte av ekte Indigenous amerikanske tradisjoner i utallige måter, gjennom læring av sanger i Lakota språk, ved å delta i Sweat Lodge seremonien, Chanupa (Sacred Pipe), Yuwipi rite, Hanbleceya (Vision Quest), Rite of passage, Sun dans, bjørn dans, samt All Night Tipi Meeting.

Vi ønsker deg velkommen til å oppleve den dype åndelige rikdommen vi har å tilby. Lær av åndelige ledere, eldste, healere og Lakota Chiefs om urtemedisin, ånd Lore, kvinnens visdom og mest av alt om deg selv. Gjenoppdage indre kraft og skjulte potensialet i deg selv gjennom dans, sang, ritualer og kunst.

Vi er et sted for tilbedelse, healing, læring og prestasjon. Hvis du er seriøs om å lære og bli involvert i den røde bane eller bare ønsker å oppleve Indigenous amerikanske Ceremony Kontakt oss, sjekk vår kalender for arrangementer, samlinger og kurs for en god tid til å besøke (se vår Location side). The Singing Stone reiser over hele Amerika, sjekk med oss ​​om hendelser i ditt område!

The Singing Stone er et hellig sted for oppbevaring av de gamle stedegne Lakota måter, for den evige ild som brøler i alle folkeslag ‘hjerte, flammen som rekindles ånden av dette landet, brenne bort en illusjon av oss selv. Gjennom sin sprakende stemme, råder Bestefar Brann oss med varme hans, undervisning respekt for tradisjon og ydmykhet med makt.

Vår er et hjem av den ydmyke stein, tipien av en sang rock, der bestemor Earth, Unci Maka, synger sanger av visdom nesten tapt. Hun forteller historiene fra i oss selv, på White Buffalo Calf Maiden og hemmelig som hun bærer i sitt hellige medisin bunt. Hun hvisker læresetninger fra Little People og andre ting ufattelige til den industrialiserte sinn. Hun puster inn i oss den hellige pust av liv, plystring gjennom våre hule bein de gales av unattachment, plettfri vind av våre forfedre og den gryende kunnskap om en lys ny verden.

Innenfor denne lodge av den hellige pust av liv flyter den mystiske feminine kraften i universet selv. Hennes undervisning blomster fra den menneskelige sjel, sin ordløse sider blomstrende stille visdom, sakte utfolder kronbladene av vårt hjerte. Hennes duft driver fra en sirkel uten ende, en evig bøyle av tradisjoner som vi nærer for alle våre relasjoner. Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! Alle av oss, vi er i slekt.

Vi er en gruppe av samarbeidspartnere som representerer mange forskjellige samfunnslag. Ligger ved foten av Sangre de Cristo Mountains i Crestone, Colorado, er vi heldige å dele denne gamle åndelige avstamning i en slik ærefrykt noen og magisk setting. Vi er tilknyttet mange Lakota åndelige ledere som Steven Bluehorse, Robert Kohel, Chief Harold Whitehorse Thompson, George Kickingbear Miller, og Aurelio Diaz Tekpankalli. The Singing Stone er Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan Norteamericana, er vi den svevende Eagle og den nordlige roten av livets tre.

 

Her hjemme hos den Singing Stone vrimler det magiske ganger usagt. Et mysterium som er ufattelig for den moderne anylitical tankene. Det kan synes å trosse vitenskapelig prosess eller gransking av noe slag. Det er en gammel forbindelse med ånder langt eldre enn menneskelig språk. The Singing Stone er dedikert til å bevare noen av de siste forbindelser til disse åndelige hjelpere av menneskeheten på den vestlige halvkule. Vi gjør dette ved å undervise seremonielle sanger i Lakota språk, ved å bevare innfødte amerikanske åndelig praksis og ved å sikre integriteten til disse hellige ritualer.

Vi har nådd et punkt i menneskehetens historie da utallige tradisjoner har falt byttedyr til utvanning av domestisering. I disse tider Religioner har blitt de-klorte av sin opprinnelige kraft, slik at mange linjene stående som en ren skall av hva de pleide å være.

Dette er ingen spekulasjon men et faktum som kan måles og telles. Med fremveksten av den industrielle revolusjonen har det vært en dramatisk nedgang i hellig tid og en ødeleggende økning i verdslig tid. Det samme har skjedd med plass sitt selvbilde. Vi kommer alle fra tradisjoner som ærer store arealer som spesielt hellig og vi hadde alle hellige steder i våre hjem. Nå hellig rom er begrenset til kirkebygg, med resten av jorden ses på som de-sacrilized av vitenskapen.

I vår moderne kultur vi er betinget i vantro, blir vi fortalt fra en tidlig alder at visse ting er å tro, og dermed begrense vår oppfatning til anylitical sinn.
Det er målet for The Singing Stone å bevare vår gamle avstamning og vi ønsker velkommen alle som er seriøse søkere på denne god rød veien.

Som praktiserer Indigenous amerikanske tradisjoner? Folk fra alle samfunnslag og alle hjørner av kloden. som alle tradisjoner og åndelig praksis, har de en tendens til å vokse. I form av indiansk spiritualitet, har Lakota tradisjoner gjort det best. Dette er slik fordi de Lakota folket har alltid delt med andre, vedtatt mennesker som familie (Hunka) og har alltid hjulpet andre uten hat og dom. Navajo har hatt en hard tid genererer interesse blant ungdom i praksis av tradisjonelle seremonier. Siden de har vært tilbakeholdne med å passere det hellige veier ut siden av sine egne slektninger de har lidd total utryddelse av mange viktige ritualer i svært misliker år. I dag Navajo er knyttet til hver rase på jorden og kommer fra alle samfunnslag. Som de fleste nasjoner på jorden, er en liten prosentandel av dem involvert i Lakota seremonier!

Det er denne illusjonen om at urfolk tradisjoner må forbli uendret, som antropologen frowning over Sundance Chief tar kjøtt tilbud med en kirurgisk skalpell i stedet for en flint kniv. den Anthro har helt gått glipp av poenget, og kan ikke se det praktiske, visdom, og graden av avløsning som ligger i ikke-innenlandsk åndelighet (vedlegg og sentimentalitet er forbedret i domestiserte dyr).

Den sanne urfolk åndelige ledere har de samme etikk og ydmykhet som de fleste av verdens religioner. I det første århundre, kristendommen umiddelbart spre seg fra å være jødisk å omfavne grekerne, etiopere og noen andre som viste interesse, er dette et naturlig fenomen som kan sees overalt. Den katolske paven er nether jødisk, gresk eller italiensk akkurat nå er han for indiansk arv! Man kan argumentere for at Native åndelighet kan ikke sammenlignes med kristendommen selv om det er den valgte banen av de fleste indianere. Noen vil si at i historien om kristendommen jødene representerte god tradisjonalistisk, bor i tråd med de hellige måter. Ingenting kunne være lenger fra sannheten fordi den jødiske tradisjon har alltid vært åpen for publikum. Folk alle trosretninger kontinuerlig konvertere til jødedommen og alltid har gjort. Det er ikke uvanlig for en mann å gjennomgå en omskjæring operasjon i håp om å bli tatt opp til jødedommen. I likhet med Navajo også de er internasjonale, globale borgere!

Som alle veier til gud, vil du finne en katolsk og protestantisk versjoner av dem alle, er det de purist fundamentalister, en ånd fylt de i rusen, samt ateister som tror de er åndelig fordi de er en del av en religion. Alle av dem spiller viktige roller som det virkelig tar alle slag!

Vi blir stadig minnet på, våre seremonielle funksjoner, av de merkelige omstendigheter av skiftende skiftende verden som vi lever. det er mange misoppfatninger om åndelighet generelt og folk i disse dager har allot av ulike motiver for å være involvert. Det er opp til oss om at de kommende generasjoner ikke forurenser urfolk måter ved å gjøre dem tamme. Dette har vært det som har såret verdens største åndelige veier mer enn noen ting annet, er det fordreining vår oppfatning, det eneste vi tar med oss ​​utover dette livet!

hva gjør Indigenous tradisjoner, av noe slag, så kraftig er at de er vill og utemmet. De få tilgang til den delen av den menneskelige psyke som er urørt av industrialisering Det er alltid viktig for den menneskelige rase å holde på den magien som er raskt viker unna oss. Mange nye alder filosofier vil være uenig med dette, men la meg påpeke at de er en strengt tamme rekke mennesker. Når noen dyr er tamme, eller selv når ville dyr blir bur eller utsatt for rutiner, har de en tendens til å skli inn nevrotiske adferdsmønstre, som bor i en bygd opp fantasiverden.

Mange innser ikke at Lakota søn dans er en internasjonal religion, for eksempel. har det dukket opp mange kraftige medisin menn og åndelige ledere som representerer Lakota tradisjoner fra hele verden. Mange er imot dette (det meste nonspiritual personer). Det er virkelig mystisk hvordan Ånden beveger seg, en person kan erverve ånd hjelpere gjennom tilknytning til en tradisjon, gjennom ekteskap, etter ordinasjon og etter fødselen, når det går i familien som tilfellet var med Daniel Dunglas Home. Det er også tilfelle der noen er født med mirakuløse krefter utenfor åndelig tradisjon helt.

Det er hundrevis av tilfeller av menneskelige fotavtrykk forsteinede i stein, hvor som helst 1-90 millioner år gammel, et vitnesbyrd til awesome mysterium mennesket og hva lurer dypt inne vår menneskelige bevissthet. Moderne Indigenous amerikanske Åndelighet er i konstant forandring som vi våre selv blir omdefinert av det vi vet, og som går for alle åndelighet, overalt!

Bare de siste gjenværende urfolk tradisjoner i verden har fortsatt mirakuløse, tilsynelatende umulige ting som vanlig. Åndelige ledere av innenlandske religion, dessverre, ikke kan begynne å forestille seg virkeligheten av den innfødte åndelige verden (whats igjen av den).

歌唱石

歌唱石是一种精神的组织,致力于保护我们的本土遗产。这是一种荣誉和喜悦分享这个古老的沿袭,通过这些方式体现的神奇体验到强大的重生。人们可以受益于真正的美国土著传统,无数的方法,通过拉科塔语歌曲的学习,参与汗屋仪式Chanupa(神圣的管子),(视觉任务仪式Yuwipi,Hanbleceya),成年礼,圣丹斯熊舞,以及所有夜踢被会议。

我们热忱欢迎您来体验我们所提供的丰富的精神的深刻。精神领袖,长老,医士和拉科塔酋长关于草药,精神绝杀,女人的智慧,所有关于自己的学习。重新发现从自己通过舞蹈,歌曲,仪式与艺术的内在动力和隐藏的潜力。

我们是一个地方的崇拜,愈合,学习和修养。如果你是认真的学习和参与红色路径,或只是想体验美国本土仪式联系我们,请访问我们的日历事件,务虚会和班级的好时机访问(见我们的位置“页)。歌唱石广泛遍及美洲旅行,请与我们有关您所在地区的事件!

唱歌的石头是一个神圣的地方保管的古代土著拉科塔方式,在各族人民的心,重新点燃了这片土地的精神,火焰咆哮的永恒之火,燃烧了自己的错觉。通过他噼里啪啦的声音,祖父消防劝告我们与他的温暖,教学传统和权力的谦卑与尊重。

我们是一个家庭的不起眼的石头,一展歌喉岩踢被,其中祖母地球,马卡祖母,唱的歌曲几乎失去了智慧。她告诉我们,从自己的故事,白水牛牛犊少女的秘密,她携带她的圣药束。她低声的教导深不可测工业化的心灵的小人物和其他的东西。她呼吸到我们神圣的生命气息,通过我们的骨骼中空呼啸的大风非附件,无可挑剔的风,我们的祖先和曙光知识的一个崭新的世界。

在这个小屋的神圣生命的气息,流自己的宇宙的神秘妩媚的功率。从人的灵魂,她的教学鲜花其无言的网页朵朵沉默的智慧,徐徐展开的花瓣,我们的心。她的香味从圆漂移没有结束,一个永恒的箍为所有我们的关系,我们培养的传统。阿霍Mitakuye Oyasin!我们所有的人,我们有关系的。

我们是一群合作者代表许多不同阶层的生活。坐落在科罗拉多州的克雷斯通在该基地的桑格雷德克克里斯托山,我们很幸运,在这样一个令人肃然起敬一些神奇的设置分享这个古老的精神谱系。我们隶属于许多拉科塔精神的领导人,如哈罗德·白马汤普森行政罗伯特Kohel,史蒂芬Bluehorse,乔治·米勒Kickingbear,和奥雷利奥Diaz Tekpankalli的的。歌唱石是富埃戈神圣之火红色巨人的土地,我们是翱翔的鹰和北方的生命之树的根。

 

在这里歌唱石的故乡盛产次难言的魔力。一个神秘的,是深不可测到的现代解析的心灵。它可能似乎无视科学的过程或任何形式的审议。这是一个古老的精神远远早于人类语言的连接。歌唱石致力于维护西半球的最后连接到这些人类精神佣工。我们这样做是拉科塔语教礼仪歌曲,保护美国本土精神的做法和维护这些神圣的仪式的完整性。

我们已经达到了一个点时,在人类历史上曾被无数传统稀释驯化。在这些时间中,宗教已阉割其原有的权力,留下许多谱系站在作为一个空壳,他们曾经是什么。

这是猜测,但一个事实,即可以测量和计数。随着工业革命的兴起,一直存在一个神圣的时间,一场毁灭性的增加急剧下降,在平凡的时间。其自我与空间发生了同样的事情。我们都来自兑现广阔的空间,特别神圣的传统,我们都曾经神圣的地方,在我们的家园。现在,神圣的空间被限制的教堂建筑,其余的被科学不神圣的d视为地球。

在我们的现代文化我们练成难以置信的,我们从小就告诉记者,从某些事情使我相信,从而限制了我们的看法的解析的头脑。
它的目标是保护我们古老的血统歌唱石,我们欢迎所有谁是认真的求职者在这个美好的红色道路。

美国土著传统,谁的做法?人们来自各行各业和全球各个角落。像所有的传统和精神的做法,他们有增长的趋势。拉科塔传统在美洲原住民灵性方面,已经做了最好的。这是拉科塔人,因为一直与他人共享作为家族(Hunka),采用人,总是帮助别人,没有仇恨和判断。纳瓦霍已经很难产生兴趣,在他们的青春在实践中的传统仪式。既然他们已经不愿意通过自己的血亲,他们所遭受的彻底灭绝了许多重要的仪式在神圣的出路侧很近年来。如今的纳瓦霍都涉及到地球上的每一场比赛,来自各行各业。地球上大多数国家一样,他们的一小部分参与在拉科塔仪式的!

这是幻觉,土著传统,像人类学家皱着眉头在圣丹斯行政手术刀,而不是一个火石肉产品必须保持不变。人类学家已经完全忽略了一点,并不能看到支队固有的的非住宅灵性(依恋和感伤的家养动物)增强的实用性,智慧和水平。

真正的土著精神领袖有相同的道德和谦卑,因为大多数世界宗教。在第一世纪,基督教立即蔓延,从犹太拥抱希腊人,埃塞俄比亚人和任何人表示有兴趣,这是一种自然现象,到处都可以看到。天主教教皇是幽冥犹太,希腊或意大利,现在他是美洲印第安人的遗产!可能有人会说母语的灵性所不能比拟的基督教,即使它是大多数土著美国人所选择的路径。有人会说,犹太人在基督教的故事代表了良好的传统主义者,留在神圣的方式。没有什么可以进一步从真相,因为犹太人的传统一直向公众开放。连续人们都信仰皈依犹太教,总是有。这是一个男人并不少见,接受包皮环切手术,希望成为承认犹太教。他们也像纳瓦霍是国际化,全球化的公民!

路径神一样,你会发现他们所有的天主教和新教的版本,也有纯粹的原教旨主义者,神采飞扬的狂喜,以及无神论者谁认为他们是精神的,因为他们是一个宗教的一部分。他们都扮演着重要的角色,因为它确实需要各种!

我们都在不断提醒,我们的礼仪活动,情节诡异的变化不断变化的世界,我们生活在其中。有很多灵性一般的误解和乡亲这些天有不同的动机参与配发。它是我们的子孙后代不会污染土著的方式使他们驯化。这已经伤害了世界上最伟大的精神路径比其他任何东西,这是扭曲了我们的看法,我们带着我们超越这种生活的唯一!

是什么让土著传统的任何一种,如此强大的是,它们是野生和野性。他们访问的那部分人类心理,是由工业化不受干扰,这是对人类的神奇,迅速后退离我们以往任何时候都重要。许多新时代的理念会不同意这一点,但让我指出,他们是一个严格的人类驯化品种。任何动物驯养,甚至野生动物时,被关或例程时,他们往往滑入神经质的行为模式,就像生活在一个幻想世界。

许多人没有意识到,拉科塔人的圣丹斯是一个国际性的宗教,例如。市面上已经出现了许多强大的代表来自世界各地的拉科塔传统巫医和精神领袖。许多人都反对这个(大多非精神人)。这是真正的神秘人可能获得的精神如何移动,通过与传统的精神佣工,通过婚姻,协调和出生的,当它运行在家庭中的情况一样 Daniel Dunglas Home 。还有的情况下,有人出生完全具有神奇的权力以外的精神传统。

有几例人类脚印化石在石头上,任何地方从100万到9000万年的历史,见证人类真棒神秘,潜伏在我们人类的意识深处。现代美国本土灵性是在不断变化的,因为我们自己重新定义我们所知道的,所有灵性,无处不在!

最后剩下的土著传统的世界仍然有奇效,看似不可能的事情司空见惯。可悲的是,国内的宗教精神领袖,不能开始想象原住民的精神世界的现实(什么左)。

La Piedra El canto

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La Piedra El canto es una organización espiritual dedicada a preservar nuestra herencia indígena. Es un honor y un placer compartir este antiguo linaje para que todos puedan experimentar el poderoso renacimiento de la magia se ejemplifica por estas maneras. Uno puede beneficiarse de verdaderas tradiciones indígenas americanas en un sinnúmero de maneras, a través del aprendizaje de las canciones en el idioma Lakota, al participar en la ceremonia de temazcal  Chanupa (pipa sagrada), Yuwipi rito, Hanbleceya (Vision Quest), Rito de paso, Sundance , Oso de baile, así como el Todo Tipi Reunión Night.

tipi

Damos una calurosa bienvenida a experimentar la profunda riqueza espiritual que tenemos que ofrecer. Aprender de los líderes espirituales, ancianos, curanderos y jefes de Lakota sobre la medicina herbal, saber espíritu, la sabiduría de la mujer y sobre todo acerca de ti. Redescubrir el poder interior y el potencial oculto dentro de ti mismo a través del baile, el canto, el ritual y el arte.

Somos un lugar de culto, la curación, el aprendizaje y los logros. Si usted es serio sobre aprender y participar en el Camino Rojo o simplemente quiere experimentar Ceremonia Indígena Americano Contacto, consulte nuestro caendar de eventos, retiros y clases para un buen momento para visitar (ver nuestra página de ubicación). La Piedra Canto viaja mucho por todo el continente americano, consulte con nosotros acerca de los eventos en su área!

Buffalo

“La razón de esta preservación no es detener la evolución de una ruta nativa, sino para detener la domesticación de la misma. Eso de-garras que lo que es una mascota obediente en lugar de una feroz pantera que inspira reverencia y el cambio.”

La Piedra El canto es un lugar sagrado para la custodia de los antiguos caminos indígenas Lakota, el fuego eterno que ruge dentro del corazón todos los pueblos, la llama que aviva el espíritu de esta tierra, quemando la ilusión de nosotros mismos. A través de su voz crepitante, el Abuelo Fuego nos aconseja con su calor, la enseñanza del respeto por la tradición y la humildad con el poder.
La nuestra es una casa de la piedra humilde, el tipi de una roca de canto, donde la Abuela Tierra, Uncimaka  canta las canciones de la sabiduría casi perdidos. Ella nos cuenta la historia desde dentro de nosotros mismos, del Búfalo Blanco Doncella y el secreto que ella lleva en su paquete medicina sagrada. Ella susurra las enseñanzas de los gnomos y otras cosas incomprensibles para la mente industrializado. Ella respira en nosotros el aliento sagrado de la vida, silbando a través de nuestros huesos huecos los vendavales de desapego, el viento impecable de nuestros antepasados ​​y el conocimiento incipiente de un mundo nuevo y brillante.
Dentro de este pabellón de la respiración sagrada de la vida fluye el poder femenino misterioso del universo mismo. Sus flores enseñanza del alma humana, de sus páginas sin palabras florecientes sabiduría silenciosa, se desarrolla lentamente los pétalos de nuestro corazón. Su fragancia deriva de un círculo sin fin, un aro eterna de tradiciones que nos nutrimos de todas nuestras relaciones. Aho Mitakuye Oyasin! Todos nosotros, que están relacionados.

july08 006
Somos un grupo de colaboradores que representan diferentes ámbitos de la vida. Situado en la base de la Sangre de Cristo Mountains en Crestone, Colorado, tenemos la suerte de compartir este antiguo linaje espiritual en tal temor alguno y mágico entorno. Estamos afiliados con muchos líderes espirituales Lakota como Steven bluehorse, Robert Kohel, director Harold Whitehorse Thompson, George Kickingbear Miller, y Aurelio Díaz Tekpankalli. La piedra canto es Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan Norteamericana, somos el Águila que se eleva y la raíz septentrional del árbol de la vida.

elk

Aquí, en la casa de la piedra de canto abunda la magia de tiempos incalculables. Un misterio que es incomprensible para la mente analítica moderna. Puede parecer a desafiar proceso científico o control de ningún tipo. Se trata de una antigua conexión con los espíritus mucho más antigua que el lenguaje humano. La Piedra de Canto se dedica a preservar algunas de las últimas conexiones a estos ayudantes espirituales de la humanidad en el Hemisferio Occidental. Hacemos esto mediante la enseñanza de canciones ceremoniales en el idioma Lakota, mediante la preservación de las prácticas espirituales indígenas de América, y protegiendo la integridad de estos ritos sagrados.

Black Bear
Hemos llegado a un momento de la historia humana, cuando innumerables tradiciones han sido víctimas de la dilución de la domesticación. En estos tiempos las religiones han de-agarrado de su poder original, dejando a muchos linajes de pie como una mera sombra de lo que solía ser.
Esto no es especulación sino un hecho que puede ser medido y se contó. Con el auge de la revolución industrial ha habido una disminución dramática en el tiempo sagrado y un aumento devastador en el tiempo mundano. Lo mismo ha ocurrido con el espacio de su auto. Todos venimos de tradiciones que honran a los grandes espacios como especialmente sagrados y todos tuvimos lugares sagrados en nuestras casas. Ahora el espacio sagrado se limita a edificios de la iglesia, con el resto de la tierra vista como se desacralizado por la ciencia.

sunset
En nuestra cultura moderna, estamos condicionados a la incredulidad, se nos dice desde muy temprana edad que ciertas cosas son hacer creer, lo que limita nuestra percepción de la mente analytical.
Es la meta de la piedra canto para preservar nuestro antiguo linaje y damos la bienvenida a todos los que son buscadores serios en este buen camino rojo.
Quiénes practican tradiciones indígenas de América? Personas de todas las clases sociales y todos los rincones del globo. como todas las tradiciones y prácticas espirituales, tienen la tendencia a crecer. En términos de espiritualidad nativa americana, la tradición Lakota han hecho lo mejor. Esto es así porque el pueblo Lakota siempre han compartido con los demás, las personas adoptadas como la familia (Hunka) y siempre han ayudado a otros sin odio y el juicio. Los navajos han tenido un interés genera dificultades entre sus jóvenes en la práctica de las ceremonias tradicionales. Puesto que han sido reacios a pasar allí formas sagradas fuera del lado de sus parientes de sangre que han sufrido la extinción total de muchos ritos muy importantes en resienten años. Hoy en día los navajos están relacionados con cada carrera en la tierra y provienen de todas las clases sociales. Como la mayoría de las naciones de la tierra, un pequeño porcentaje de ellos están involucrados en ceremonias Lakota!

Lodge

Existe la ilusión de que las tradiciones indígenas deben permanecer sin cambios, al igual que el antropólogo con el ceño fruncido por el Jefe de Sundance tomar ofrendas de carne con un bisturí quirúrgico en lugar de un cuchillo de pedernal. la antropología ha perdido totalmente el punto y no puede ver la practicidad, la sabiduría, y el nivel de desapego inherente a la espiritualidad no doméstico (el apego y el sentimentalismo se han mejorado en los animales domésticos).

rainbow

Los verdaderos líderes espirituales indígenas tienen la misma ética y la humildad como la mayoría de las religiones del mundo. En el primer siglo, el cristianismo se extendió inmediatamente de ser judía a abrazar griegos, etíopes y cualquier otra persona que expresó su interés, este es un fenómeno natural que se puede ver en todas partes. El papa católico es inferior judío, griego o italiano en estos momentos él es de origen indio americano! Se podría argumentar que la espiritualidad nativa no se puede comparar al cristianismo a pesar de que es el camino elegido por la mayoría de los nativos americanos. Algunos podrían decir que en la historia del cristianismo los Judios representado el bien tradicionalista, manteniéndose en línea con las formas sagradas. Nada podría estar más lejos de la verdad, porque la tradición judía siempre ha estado abierto al público. La gente todos los credos continuamente convertirse al judaísmo y siempre tienen. No es raro que un hombre se someta a una operación de circuncisión con la esperanza de llegar a ser admitido en el judaísmo. Al igual que los navajos también son ciudadanos internacionales, mundiales!

creek

Al igual que todos los caminos a Dios, usted encontrará una versiones católicas y protestantes de todos ellos, se encuentran los fundamentalistas puristas, el espíritu lleno de los éxtasis, así como los ateos que creen que son espirituales, porque son parte de una religión. Todos ellos juegan un papel importante, ya que realmente necesita todo tipo!

Se nos recuerda constantemente a, nuestras funciones ceremoniales, de las extrañas circunstancias de la evolución del mundo cambiante en el que vivimos. hay un montón de ideas falsas acerca de la espiritualidad en general y la gente en estos días tienen adjudicar de diferentes motivos para estar involucrado. Depende de nosotros que las próximas generaciones no contaminan las formas indígenas, haciéndolos domesticados. Esto ha sido lo que ha perjudicado a los mundos más grandes caminos espirituales más que cualquier otra cosa, es deformar nuestra percepción, lo único que nos llevamos con nosotros más allá de esta vida!sep oct 2012 110

lo que hace que las tradiciones indígenas, de cualquier tipo, así que de gran alcance es que son salvaje e indómito. Ellos tienen acceso a esa parte de la psique humana que es molestado por la industrialización es cada vez más importante para la raza humana de aferrarse a la magia que se aleja rápidamente de nosotros. Muchas de las nuevas filosofías de edad no están de acuerdo con esto, pero quiero señalar que hay una gran variedad estrictamente casero de los seres humanos. Cuando un animal se domestica, o incluso cuando los animales salvajes están enjaulados o sometidos a rutinas, tienden a caer en comportamientos neuróticos, como vivir en un mundo de fantasía hecha.

Students

Muchos no se dan cuenta que el Lakota Sundance es una religión internacional, por ejemplo. ha surgido muchos poderosos curanderos y líderes espirituales Lakota que representan las tradiciones de todo el mundo. Muchas personas están en contra de esto (sobre todo personas no espirituales). Es un verdadero misterio cómo el espíritu se mueve, una persona puede adquirir ayudantes espirituales a través de la asociación con una tradición, a través del matrimonio, la ordenación, por nacimiento, cuando se ejecuta en la familia, como fue el caso de Daniel Dunglas Home. También está el caso en que una persona nace con poderes milagrosos fuera de la tradición espiritual completo.

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Hay cientos de casos de huellas humanas fosilizadas en piedra 1-90 million años, un testimonio del misterio asombroso de la humanidad y lo que se esconde en lo profundo de nuestra conciencia humana. Modern Espiritualidad Indígena Americano está en constante cambio, ya que nuestro yo se redefinen por lo que sabemos, y eso va para todos los de la espiritualidad, en todas partes!Dancing

Sólo los últimos tradiciones indígenas restantes del mundo todavía tienen cosas milagrosas, que parecen imposibles como algo común. Los líderes espirituales de la religión nacional, por desgracia, no se puede empezar a imaginar la realidad del mundo espiritual aborigen (cuál queda de ella).

Elk Hide

歌うストーンは、私たちネイティブ遺産保全に捧げ霊的な組織です。

歌うストーンは、私たちネイティブ遺産保全に捧げ霊的な組織です。それは名誉とこれらの方法によって例示魔法の強力な復活を体験するために、すべてのために、この古代の血統を共有する喜びです。一つはラコタ語で歌の学習を通じて、スウェットロッジセレモニー、Chanupa(聖なるパイプ)、Yuwipi儀式、Hanbleceya(ビジョンクエスト)、通過儀礼、サンダンス映画祭に参加することで、無数の方法で真の先住民のアメリカの伝統の恩恵を受けることができます、クマダンスだけでなく、オールナイトティピー会議。

我々は温かく私たちが提供しなければならない深刻な精神的な豊かさを体験するためにあなたを歓迎します。スピリチュアルリーダー、長老、ヒーラーとラコタチーフス漢方薬について、精神の伝承、女性の知恵と自分自身について、すべてのほとんどから学ぶ。インナーパワーとダンス、歌、儀式やアートを通して自分の中から隠された可能性を再発見。

私たちは、礼拝、癒し、学習と成果の場所です。あなたが学習し、赤のパスに巻き込ま真剣に考えているか、単にお問い合わせ先住民アメリカのセレモニーを体験したい場合は、(私たちの場所のページを参照)を訪問する良い時間のためのイベント、リトリートとクラスのための私達のカレンダーを確認してください。歌うストーンはアメリカ大陸を通して広範囲に渡って移動する、お住まいの地域でのイベントについての私達と確認してください!

歌う石自身の錯覚を離れて燃える、、すべての人々の心の中でうなり声永遠の火のために、この土地の精神をrekindles炎古代先住民族ラコタの方法の保管のための神聖な場所です。彼のパチパチ声を通して、祖父の火が力を持つ伝統と謙虚に敬意を教え、彼の暖かさで私たちを弁護。
我々は祖母地球、マカuncusの複数形は、ほとんど失われ知恵の歌を歌って謙虚な石、歌石のティピのホームです。彼女は私たちにホワイトバッファローカーフメイデン、彼女は彼女の神聖な医学バンドルに運ぶ秘密の自分自身の中から物語を、伝えます。彼女はささやき先進心に計り知れないリトルピープルや他のものの教えを。彼女は私たちの中空の骨を通してunattachmentの強風、私たちの先祖の非の打ちどころのない風と明るい新世界の夜明け知識を口笛​​、私たちに命の神聖な息を吹き込む。
生命の神聖な息のこのロッジ内宇宙自身の神秘的な女性パワーを流れている。人間の魂からの彼女の指導の花、サイレント知恵を開花その無言のページでは、徐々に私たちの心の花びらを展開。彼女の香りは私達が私達の関係のすべてのために育てている伝統の永遠のフープ、終了せずにサークルから漂う。アホMitakuye Oyasin!私たちのすべてが、我々は関連しています。
私たちは、人生のさまざまな歩みを表す協力者のグループです。クレストン、コロラド州サングレデクリスト山脈のふもとに位置し、我々はそのようないくつかの畏敬の念や魔法の設定で、この古代の霊的な血統を共有することが幸運です。我々はこのようなスティーブンBluehorse、ロバートKohel、チーフハロルドホワイトホーストンプソン、ジョージKickingbearミラー、およびアウレリオディアスTekpankalliできるだけ多くのラコタの精神的指導者と提携している。歌うストーンはフエゴグラドデItzachilatlan Norteamericanaですが、我々は高騰イーグルと命の木の北ルートである。

ここで歌うの石の家で莫大な時間の魔法があふれて。現代anylitical心に計り知れない謎。それはどんな種類の科学的なプロセスや精査を無視するように見えるかもしれません。それは人間の言語よりもはるかに年上の精神を持つ古代の接続です。歌う石は西半球で人類のこれらのスピリット·ヘルパーへの最後の接続のいくつかの保全に取り組んでいます。我々はアメリカの先住民族の精神的な慣行を維持することにより、ラコタ語で儀式の歌を教えることによって、これらの神聖な儀式の完全性を保護することでこれをやっている。
私たちは、数え切れないほどの伝統が家畜化の希釈の餌食に下落している人類の歴史のポイントに達しています。これらの時代に宗教は、彼らがするために使用されるものの単なるシェルとして立っている多くの系統を残して、元の電源の脱爪されました。
これは憶測ですが測定して計数することができるという事実はありません。産業革命の立ち上がりに神聖な時間の劇的な減少と世俗的な時間で壊滅的な増加があった。同じことは、宇宙との自己発生しました。我々はすべて、特に神聖なものとして広大なスペースを称える伝統から来て、我々はすべて私たちの家庭では神聖な場所を持っていた。今、神聖な空間は、科学によってデsacrilizedされていると見られ、地球の残りの部分と、教会の建物に限定されます。
我々は不信に条件付けされている我々の現代の文化では、我々はこのようanylitical心に私たちの知覚を制限し、特定の物事が信じさせていることを幼い頃から言われています。
それは私たちの古代の血統を維持するために歌うストーンの目標であり、我々はこの良い赤の道に深刻な求職者であるすべての人を歓迎します。
先住民アメリカの伝統を実践誰ですか?すべての人生の歩みと世界のすべてのコーナーからの人々。すべての伝統と精神的な慣行のように、彼らが成長する傾向がある。ネイティブアメリカンの精神性の面では、ラコタの伝統は、最善を尽くしています。ラコタの人々は、常に家族(Hunka)として採択され、人々が、他のユーザーと共有しており、常に憎しみと判断することなく、他の人を助けているので、これはそうです。ナバホ族は、伝統的な儀式の実践での若者の関心を生成するのに苦労してきました。彼らは自分の血縁の側うちそこに神聖な方法を渡すことに消極的であったので、彼らは非常に年再送に多くの重要な儀式の総絶滅に苦しんでいる。今日ナバホは、地球上のすべてのレースに関連しており、すべての人生の歩みから来る。地球のほとんどの国と同様に、それらの小さな割合はラコタceremonialsに関与している!

先住民族の伝統ではなくフリントナイフの外科メスで肉の提供を取ってダンスチーフにわたってしかめ人類学者のように、変わらなければならないことを、この錯覚があります。人為は完全にポイントを逃しており、実用性、知恵、非国産霊(アタッチメントと感傷が家畜に強化されています)に固有の剥離のレベルを見ることができません。

真の先住民の精神的指導者は、世界の宗教のほとんどと同じ倫理と謙虚さを持っている。ギリシア人は、エチオピアと関心を表明し、他のいずれかを採用するユダヤ人であることから広がった最初の世紀には、キリスト教は、直ちに、これはどこでも見ることができる自然現象です。カトリックの教皇は、彼がアメリカインディアンの遺産の一つだ今地獄、ユダヤ人のギリシャ語、またはイタリア語です!一つは、それがほとんどのネイティブアメリカンの選択されたパスであるにもかかわらずそのネイティブ霊がキリスト教に比較することができないと主張するかもしれません。いくつかは、キリスト教の物語の中でユダヤ人は神聖な方法に沿って滞在し、良い伝統を表したと言うでしょう。ユダヤ教の伝統は、常に一般に公開されているため、何も真実から遠いことができなかった。人々は、すべての宗教は、継続的にユダヤ教に変換し、常に持っている。男がユダヤ教に入院になる期待して割礼の手術を受けることは珍しくありません。ナバホ同様に彼らはあまりにも国際的、グローバルな市民である!

神へのすべてのパスのように、あなたがそれらのすべてのカトリックとプロテスタントのバージョンを見つけることが、純粋主義者の原理主義者、精神いっぱい歓喜のものと同様に、彼らは宗教の一部であるため、彼らは精神的だと思う無神論者があります。それは本当にすべての種類を取るとして、それらのすべてが重要な役割を果たしている!

我々は常に我々が住んでいる変化に変化する世界の奇妙な状況で、私たちの冠婚葬祭、で思い出しています。一般的に精神性と人々についての誤解の多くは、これらの日は、関与しているため、異なる動機の割り当てるを持ってあります。これからの世代は、彼らが飼いならされたことで、土着の方法を汚染していないことを私たちに任されています。これは、より多くの他の任意のものよりも世界最大の精神的なパスを傷つけたものであった、それは、私たちはこの人生を越えて私たちと一緒に取る唯一のこと私たちの知覚の反りです!

どのようなので、強力な、あらゆる種類の、先住民の伝統になり、彼らが野生であるということですし、飼いならされていない。彼らはそれが迅速に離れて私たちから後退している魔法を保持するために、人類のためにこれまでに重要である工業化によって苦しめられている人間の精神のその部分にアクセスします。多くの新しい時代の哲学は、これに反対するが、私は彼らが人間の厳密に飼いならされた多様であることを指摘してみましょうと思います。どんな動物が飼いならされている、または野生動物がケージま​​たはルーチンにさらされている場合でも、それらは構成され幻想的な世界に住んでいるような、神経症的行動パターンに陥る傾向があります。とき

多くはラコタサンダンスは、例えば、国際的な宗教であることに気付いていない。世界中からラコタの伝統を代表する多くの強力な薬の男性と精神的な指導者が浮上している。多くの人々はこの(主に霊性を否定する人々)に反対している。それはダニエルDunglasホームの場合とあったように、それは家族の中で実行したときに人は、調整することによって、出生によって、婚姻を通じて、伝統との関連を通してスピリット·ヘルパーを取得することができる方法の精神の動き、本当に不思議です。誰かが完全に精神的な伝統の外に奇跡の力を持って生まれている場合もある。

石に化石人間の足の印刷物の事例の何百、任意の場所100万〜90万年前に、人類の素晴らしい謎の証、何私たち人間の意識の奥深くに潜んでいるがあります。我々我々の自己は、私たちが知っていることによって再定義されているように現代の先住民アメリカ震災は一定流動的であり、それはどこにでも、精神のすべてのために行く!

世界の唯一の最後に残った土着の伝統は今でも当たり前のように奇跡的な、一見不可能なものを持っている。国内の宗教の精神的な指導者たちは、悲しいことに、先住民の精神世界の現実を(それの左いただきました)想像して始めることはできません。

What is the Sundance?

The Sun Dance is an annual summertime dance that involves dancing around a sacrificial Cottonwood tree.  The participants perform a short sweat lodge in the mornings and evenings.  Dancers enter the dance arbor at dawn, they dance throughout the day in intervals until evening.  This continues for a total of four days without food and water (details and doctrines may vary).

The Sun Dance is sponsored by an individual although each dancer participates for some selfless reason.  For the healing of someone, to support a good cause, or for the life of a friend or relative.  Dancers pledge to dance annually for four years. Sometimes, during some versions of the dance, piercing of the skin may be involved. Piercing is not required and may vary with individual preference ( according to ones’ own vision ).

After finishing the four year commitment dancers preform a give away. The Give Away is a showering of gifts by a grateful person upon the rest of the community and everyone else present.  This is done to say thank you to the spirits as well as the people.

The Sun Dance rite is thousands years old and empowers the people by allowing dancers to give of them selves for the Earth, for others as well as for other selfless reasons. Some elements of the dance have been added recently like the pulling of Buffalo skulls. This was originally done for the atonement of something and was not necessarily part of the dance. that is why it is done outside of the dance arbor away from the the Sun Dance tree. The involvement of the Heyoka, or sacred clown is said to be a recent addition to the dance as well. Long ago women did not dance unless a dancer they supported died before finishing their commitment. There came a time when most of the dancers died and women had to dance to continue the tradition, they have participated ever since.

Like many other details in the spiritual world the fact that they are moving and growing is ample evidence of its’ own sentience and life!  The Sun Dance , as a living entity, works well above the human sphere. At its, center is the sun, next is the tree that gave its life. Then there is the Intercessor, medicine man, the woman representing the White Buffalo Calf Maiden and all the dancers. then just as important are the supporters. All of them are guided by the power of the sun in this dance that has its’ own will and volition regardless of anything else.

In the old days, a band of people would sponsor their spiritual leader or any one capable of accomplishing the dance, and have that person dance to help them, to sacrifice for them to improve their survival and well being. There was one Lakota Sun Dance yearly immediately following the main tribal council representing the entire tribe. One can clearly see by this, that dancing was not done to prove ones self or to gain spiritual advancement. The Sun Dance should be done by those who are responsible for other peoples’spirituality (by spiritual leaders). One should only dance for some selfless reason and never for your own gain. it is true that by doing the Sun Dance one gains a spiritual connection, but this is only the case for those who do so selflessly. Spiritual gifts then, are more of a by-product of dancing than the motive for it.

The sun Dance has grown unbelievably across the Americas and is practiced abroad by Representative’s of 53 different countries. Despite controversy, the Sun Dance has become an international spiritual path and will continue to flourish with the sun’s help.

The Native American tribes who originally practiced this dance were: The Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine  Cheyenne, Crow, Gros, Ventre, Hidatsa  Sioux, Plains Cree, Plains Ojibway, Sarasi, Omaha, Ponca, Ute, Shoshone, Kiowa, and Blackfoot tribes. Their rituals varied from tribe to tribe. Today, the Sun Dance has survived colonization through it’s secretive practice, despite being illegal until recently.

The importance here is to remember that there is no right or wrong way to pray as long as you respect the teaching of the elders who brought it to the people. Do this by keeping it sacred, not blending it with foreign concepts, and understanding its’ history! The Sun Dance was given to the Lakota people by the White Buffalo Calf Maiden along with the Seven Sacred Rites hundreds’ of years ago according to Lakota records painted on buffalo hides!

The Sun Dance itself, according to Archaeologists, may have started any where from about 4,000 to 14,000 years ago. Countless thousands of pipes have been unearthed from the Hopewell culture in the Ohio Valley, some of which represent woolly mammoth and manatee!

Religious Freedom Links

The internet can be an amazing resource for Religious Freedom Links. here are some of our favorites! If you are are experiencing Religious persecution click the links below to learn what to do about it. be sure to read our other posts under the category of  L.A.W.

Click here to Read the American Indian Religious Freedom Act !

Click here to read The Universal Declaration of Human Rights!

The Office of International Religious Freedom has the mission of promoting religious freedom as a core objective of U.S. foreign policy. The office is headed by Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom Suzan Johnson Cook. We monitor religious persecution and discrimination worldwide, recommend and implement policies in respective regions or countries, and develop programs to promote religious freedom

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International Coalition for Religious Freedom
  “is a non-profit, non-sectarian, educational organization dedicated to defending the religious freedom of all, regardless of creed, gender, or ethnic origin.The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice,  created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin

The First Amendment Center We support the First Amendment and build understanding of its core freedoms through education, information and entertainment.

Religious Tolerance  Ontario consultants on religious tolerance. An awesome site!

American Center for Law and Justice  (ACLJ) and its globally affiliated organizations are committed to ensuring the ongoing viability of freedom and liberty in the United States and around the world.

American Civil Liberties Union,The ACLU is our nation’s guardian of liberty, working daily in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country.

CESNUR (Center for Studies on New Religions), CHANGING RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN A CHANGING WORLD.

First Freedom Center , The mission of the First Freedom Center is to advance the fundamental human rights of freedom of religion and freedom of conscience.

Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, The Research Institute of The ERLCrepresents an evangelical think tank that includes university and seminary presidents, academic deans, professors, lawyers, doctors, theologians, and other evangelical scholars.

Foundation for Religious Freedom, Educating the public as to religious rights.

The Freedom Forum On Line, The center serves as a forum for the study and exploration of free-expression issues, including freedom of speech, of the press and of religion, and the rights to assemble and to petition the government.

Liberty Counsel, Restoring the culture by advancing religious freedom, the sanctity of human life and the family.

People For the American Way, Our America respects diversity, nurtures creativity and combats hatred and bigotry.

The Rutherford Institute, Dedicated to the defense of civil liberties and human rights.

Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Powow

Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Powow

Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Powow

Come learn, enjoy, and participate with the drums of Native American tribes sounding through Saguache.

Saguache Powwow began as an idea in 2010.  We discovered that it was a continuation of a Powwow from 20 years prior.  It continued with a “first” Powwow in 2011 and now we are putting together Powwow 2013.  We look forward into the future and see many more Powwows to come.  Our mission:  Education, Service, and Promoting Pride in our community’s many Indigenous heritages.

Warriors

Hau Kola!  We have a date!  September 7th is our Powwow this year!  We have two host drums and will be formally inviting our local Sacred Breath Lodge Drum as well.

Click this link: Annual Saguache Traditional Wacipi Intertribal Powow

This Powwow began as a dream many years ago.  It was created to be a heritage learning experience by a Native American community member for her children.  Her dream was to keep Indigenous Heritage alive in the comunity while instilling pride in her children as they learned about regalia and dancing.  It has been twenty years since those Powwows.  Now this community member works on the current committee to continue that dream on a larger scale.

This is the current Powwow’s second year.  We are excited to keep the Powwow sep oct 2012 005going in our area.  This is an annual Traditional Intertribal event.  Everyone is welcome.  Admission is free.  There is a free dinner for the Elders and special guests the Friday evening prior to the Powwow.  We will update this listing with more information as it comes.  Our email is saguachepowwow@gmail.com and we are on Google+ at +SaguachePowwow.

Come keep the dream alive.  Many Nations, One Community!

Contact: 2012 Chair- Crowfox Fleming
Phone: 719-256-4612
Email: saguachepowwow@gmail.com
Website:+Saguache Powwow on Google+
Head Man: Chosen at Powwow
Head Lady: Chosen at Powwow

Russel Box_LAN9284

Songs to Learn

Lakota songs lyrics, Some Songs to Learn.

Also see our song list by clicking here!

También vea nuestra lista de canciones haciendo clic aquí!

 

This song is used in the Sweat Lodge during the prayer round, It is used for prayers in the Yuwipi \ Lowanpi as well as any prayerful occasion. As with most of these songs, this starts out with some vocables. Unlike most Lakota songs, this one has no call and response, others simply join after the lead singer sings the first line.

 

 

Click here: Prayer song

Wakan Tanka unsimalayo he makakijelo,

Chanunpa kile he yuha hoye wayelo.

Great spirit have compassion on me for i am suffering

this pipe i have prayed with.

 

Notice the ” HE ” at the end of each verse, Most all of these songs have that.

The prayer song [above] is very versatile, Sung at any traditional Ceremony, usually at a prayerful point. The spirit calling song [below] can be sung in most any ceremony as well. Some tiospaye’s sing it first round after the invocational ( directional ), Others sing it third round near the end. The same applys to Yuwipi \ Lowanpi.

Click here: Spirit Calling Song

Tunkashila wamayank uye Tunkashila wamayank uye Tunkashila wamayank uye

Ikce wicasa ta Canupa wan yuha hoye wayelo, mitakuye ob wani ktelo

heyaya hoye wayelo.

Granfather come and see me, Granfather come and see me, Granfather come and see me,

I send a voice with the people’s pipe, so i may live with my relitives.

I keep sending a voice.

Before anything one should begin by filling the sacred Canupa (pipe). This song is sung to load the pipe. Note that the word Hocoka is replaced with the word canupa in the first verse. This song is generally song twice or untill the pipe is loaded.

Click here: Pipe filling song

Pipe Filling Song

Kola lece lecun wo! Kola lece lecun wo! Kola lece lecun wo!

Hecanuki, nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Hocoka wanji yuha ilotake ci Miksuya opagi yelo!                         (Canupa)

Hecanuki taku yacin ki Iyece tu ktelo.

My friend do it like this! My friend do it like this! My friend do it like this!

If you do, your Grandfather will come down to see you.

This sacred rite when you sit down to begin

remember me as you load the Pipe! If you do this, whatever you want will come true.

By far the most important songs to know are these . when singing an invitational song you open the doorway to another dimension, These songs [below] open it again to allow them to return. Good to send ghosts away, not to be sung at funerals!

Click here: Closing song

Offering song

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo

Tunkasila le ampelo

Ikce wicasa ta canunpi ki leyuha

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo

Tunkasila le ampelo

Send a voice, send a voice

Send a voice, send a voice

Grandfather on this day

Common man carries the pipe

Send a voice, send a voice

Grandfather on this day

This song is always sung to end a Sweat Lodge Yuwipi-Lowanpi ,Sun dance, Vision Quest and most any Ceremony.

Click here: Sending the spirits home song

Sending the Spirits Home Song
Hoye taninyan kin najin pelo, hoye taninyan kin najin pelo

Tunkashila ta wokonze ca, lena cicu welo

Hoye taninyan kin najin pelo, hoye taninyan kin najin pelo

Tunkashila ta wokonze ca, lena cicu welo

(optional) Kola le wakan yelo

canunpa wa hoye cici apelo oyasin yelo

As we leave, our voices are heard, as we leave, our voices are heard

It is Grandfather’s will that I give you these offerings

This song ends the ceremony and is sung before smoking the Canupa.

Click here: Quitting song

Quitting Song

Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyeyo, Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyeyo

Anpetu ki leciya cicu welo wayankiyeyo

My friend, I have given you these, behold them

My friend, I have given you these, behold them

This day over here I give you these offerings

Behold them.

 

 

About Sweat lodge songs

 

About Sweat lodge songs

Most Lakota sweat lodges are very similar, Most have four rounds and the same basic format. whether the rocks are all brought in at once or what ever, you first set the stage and then you call in the spirits, Just like any thing else. Some Lodges the first round is in preparation for the invocation, in others it all happens first round right off the bat. Next you address the spirits, you pray, ask them some thing or just say hello. Then comes the doctoring or at least, the point where the spirits act, where they move about.

First you call your friends over, then you ask them advice or just talk, then you entertain them and they respond, they can give you advice. Just like having guests over, you’ll probably have to feed them and even get them back home. So it is in the world of invoking spirits, not much different than inviting embodied guests over! The songs follow a logical sequence. my aim in saying all this is not to teach those who want to run Sweat Lodge’s without traditional initiation. Singers are rare though, so I would like to invite you all to learn Lakota Sweat Lodge Songs here! Most Sweat Lodges preformed all over are Lakota in origin. Some were passed without proper instructions. Others may have been copied without formal initiation and they should seek a teacher. Pouring water for a sweat lodge without  knowing an invitational song is like trying to drive a car without gas, still  a lot of people seem content doing this. Furthermore, pouring water for a sweat lodge without singing a closing song is like trying to steal a car without gas, It may have serious implications.

Some individuals fail to appreciate the powers that these traditional songs conjure up. Perhaps they had their eyes closed during the lodge! In this modern world it can be difficult for the domesticated mindset to grasp the concept of invocation, this is understandable.

All too often the lack of songs in a Sweat Lodge can be attributed to the simple fact that the leader just can’t sing. If that is the case you must find a singer, just like the olden days, you find singers to call the spirits. Learning songs is is not only therapeutic, it can give you the key to the doorway of another dimension. Song has always been the invocation  key in every culture of human kind. One need not take our word for it though, find out for yourselves!

Knowing the Correct sequence of the sweat lodge songs can dramatically transform everyone present. Some people learn the basics and maybe a song or two.Then they Are transformed into experts almost overnight! Like they say, THE ONE EYED MAN IS KING IN THE VALLEY OF THE BLIND. It is the singer that is entrusted with the power, the humble voice in the background. So remember, First open the door with a directional song, then, while the door is open, sing individual calling songs. Next round pray and sing prayer songs. Then they dance and heal with dancing and healing songs. Then thank them, make offerings (give gifts) and send them home! This is the same with any ritual any where!

To correctly preform a Sweat Lodge one needs to undergo Hanbleceya (Vision Quest). Herein lies the secret to spirit helpers, the origin of songs as well as the connection to specific ancient lineages. Learn the songs from our song posts, keep in mind the sequence, some song sets we have listed are in order.

 

Click this link to Hear and Learn sweat lodge songs!

Check out our site for more songs or come and learn directly from us most every Saturday from 3-5 pm. Crestone Colorado. Contact us for details and availability!

Lakota story characters

Lakota story characters

Anog Ite Originally Ite, daughter of Wa and Ka and wife of Tate. Caught in a seduction, she was condemned to have two faces, one beautiful and the other hideous. A figure of disharmony, of turning aside from tradition. She is the mother of the Four Winds and Yum, the whirlwind. Because of her separation from her children, she causes birth pains to women and makes babies cry. She appears in dreams to young women, offering to teach them crafts, quill work in particular, which was a skill in which practitioners did not follow social norms.

Anp Spirit of light, particularly the reddish sunlight of dawn, source-less radiance.

Capa The Beaver Source and patron of hard work and domestic tranquility.

Cetan The Hawk Source and patron of swiftness in action, and inner stamina.

Han Spirit of Darkness Pre-existent to all things, Han and Anp follow each other to exile beneath Maka and return, balancing light and dark.

Hanwi The wandering Moon; created by the Sun to accompany him.

Hehaka The (male) Elk The source and patron of sexuality and intimacy. He is the relationship counselor and can be compared to cupid.

Heyoka , the sacred clown, both a divine entity and the effects of the spirit upon humans. Double-faced, showing joy on one side and grief on the other. He is the source of meteors, and people who dream of Wakinyan often become heyokas – doing everything backwards. These are known afterwards for their healing powers, and powers of dream interpretation, although they go through life terrified of thunder and lightening.

Hihankara (Owl-Maker) A crone Goddess who stands at the entrance to the Sky-Road (the Milky Way). She examines each who approaches, and if they do not have the correct tattoos, she pushes them from the path and they fall back to earth to wander as ghosts. Hihankara is comparable to the Greek Charon, the ferry man of souls.

Gnaska The Frog  patron of sorcery and magic. He is somtimes seen as a greedy trickster in some storys. Gnas means to fool. The Toad, Makpia, has to do with undoing sorcery.

Hogan The Fish patron of water, particularly as a cleanser and purifier.

Iktinike Son of Wi Banished to earth by the Sun for telling lies.

Iktomi, Son of Inyan and Wakinyan, is the tricky spider man, he has the power to speak to all things, living or inanimate. He gave the power of speech to humans and can talk to Wakinyan, He is regarded as heyoka, wise but a prankster, responsible for many difficulties humans have. He panics animals, and can shape shift or become invisible.

Inyan, Stone the Creator. patron of the Arts, original ancestor of all and source of all.  Because there was nothingness, he sacrificed a part of Himself in order to spawn the Universe and have a place to be. This act of self-offering caused him to become stone. His blood is water that became all the rivers, streams, and lakes. He made the Earth (Maka) his wife and created the Wakinyan to be his active counterparts. Iktomi and Iya are his sons. He is the spirit of Wakan Tanka.

Iya, Cyclone An evil child of Inyan and Unk, responsible, directly or indirectly, for all evil in the world. In his monster-like aspect he devours any animal or human and his breath is said to cause illness. Iya, is the brother of Iktomi and amounts only to destruction and sorrow.  Wakinyan is at war with him which started as jealously because Wakinyan was Inyan first companion.

Ka The first woman; wife of Wa and the mother of Ite. Banished to Earth and separated from Wa she became known as Wakanka, a great witch. If she chooses, she helps or hinders those she encounters.

Keya The Turtle patron of health, longevity, and healing rituals, especially surgery. the power of the feminine and protection.

Makpia, is a patron of sorcery and magic, The toad has to do with Rain, and especially with healing and undoing sorcery.

Maka The Earth Created by Inyan from his own substance. Maka was unsatisfied, cold and barren or too hot until Skan created Sun and Moon to follow one another in regular order.

Mato, The Bear  patron of wisdom and medicine. He is known as Hununpa or Tobtob. From him one learns knowledge of herbs, mushrooms, about love, fearless bravery and the language of the spirits. He is a healer, the wisest and is the spiritual archetype of all bears. Mato is said to have created the four legged animals. the bear is considered a two legged.

Mica , Sungmanitu, Coyote Trickster divinity especially involved in Tatanka Lowanpi, the girls puberty rite ritual wherein young women carefully wrap their first blood and place it in a tree so that the spirits of the tree will aid in their fertility. Mica tries to carry the bundles off so that he may control the girl.

Okaga A fertility spirit associated with the South as bringer of the south winds and warm weather. Okaga is the fourth brother of the Four Winds.  He is from the south and he marries Wohpe.

Skan source of all force, movement and power. He is the Sky and the wind is his helper. He sets the universe in motion along with the the order of all things. Skan is the judge of gods and mortals alike. Skan is comparable to the Greek Hermes.

Sungmanitu Tanka The Wolf Source and patron of the hunt.

Sunka The Dog patron of innocence and humility. Divine companion to humankind, He is the one responsible for watching over the humans and is their medicine when all hope is lost. The Dog is offered up to the wakinyan in the most dire situation as mans most valuable thing and then becomes  their most potent medicine as an inducer of humility.

Taku Skanskan The power of movement, one of the powers in wakan wicoh’an saced ceremony. That which causes every thing to move in the yuwipi / lowanpi.

Tatanka The (male) Buffalo Source and patron of plentiful food, health, and general tribal well-being. He is a magician, teaching proper rituals. Tatanka is regarded as remaining within the physical remains of the animal, especially the skull. He is the defender of young women’s first menstrual bundles that Mica tries to steal.

Tatankan Gnaskiyan (Crazy Buffalo) An evil spirit who wreaks havoc upon love affairs, causing fighting, murders, or suicides.

Tate The Wind Created by Skan to be His companion. Tate took Ite as His wife. She bore Him four sons, but was banished. Tate received permission for them to dwell upon Maka. They settle in the middle of the world, where Tate sends his four elder sons to the cardinal points, to establish dominion over them.

Unhcegila An evil spirit that dwells in secret places, resembling a large reptile. Disappearances and mysterious deaths are attributed to him.

Unk (Contention) Created to be a companion for Maka. She is the mother of Iya and Gnas. She was so beautiful that Maka became jealous and sent her away into the  depths of the waters, where she, with Iya, became the progenitor of all evil beings.

Unktehi A group of evil monsters, males living within water and females on land. Dangerous and malignant they cause flooding and contaminate water sources. They are also teachers, instructing humans in body painting for ceremonial purposes.

Wa, The first man; husband of Ka and father of Ite. He aided Ite so was banished to Earth and separated from Ka. Here, he became known as Wazi, great wizard. He helps or hinders those he encounters as he chooses. See Waziya.

Wakan ,  That which gives and takes life, the control of the life force.

Wakanpi General term for spirits, supernatural beings, Gods and Goddesses. Both good and bad, all watch over humans and expect proper ceremonies to be executed in their honor.

Wakan Tanka The Great controler of life. Wakan Tanka is the supreme power of the universe. The term refers on one level to the spiritual powers of the universe assembled together around a council fire. It is a council of spirits representing all of creation, and a single entity. So in Wakan Tanka is the collective power of all Gods and other entities. Together, they are one. Wakan Tanka controls all space and time, and is present in all things.

Underlying Wakan Tanka is the spirit Inyan, who caused all things to be by sacrificing his own essence, thereby infusing all things with it, animate and inanimate.  Wakan Tanka is addressed directly in prayer and ritual, but His influence in the material world is diffused through his elements and aspects.

Wakinyan, Thunderbeings The creators of all grass, living in the west the thunderbirds are winged bird-like creatures and patrons of cleanliness. They are known to have the voice of thunder and the glance of lightning. They are the enforcers of divine law. They offer protection to humans from Waziya. The Thunderbeings are eternally at war with the Unktehi, the monstrous forces of evil. Thunderbirds rule the heyoka.

Wambli The Eagle Overseer of battle and hunting kills and
patron of councils, especially hunting councils.

 Wamani Omini Hoksila The Whirlwind boy , fifth child of Tate and Ite. Has to do with mental health and the mind.  He rules good and bad luck in games, gambling and with love.

Wanagi The soul (nagi) of a dead person, as well as the spiritual aspect of one’s physical self, the body’s ghost. The spirit is a part of the wanagi along with many other things. (The soul in a living person is a Woniya). Wanagi leave the earth to travel the Sky Road (the Milky Way), but first they must successfully pass Hihankara.

Waziya the wicked wizard of the North. He is the north wind, consort of Wakanka, the archetypal witch. He is patron of winter, famine and disease. He also guards the aurora borealis, and controls ice and snow. Waziya is the father of Anog Ite. Waziya was formerly known as Wa (The first man).

Wi The Sun, is one of the four superior spiritual beings. He is Chief of the spirit world, the earth and the inner earth.

Wiyohipeyata The West, Spirit with the authority over all things that happen by night, associated with completion.

Wiyohiyanpa The East Spirit with the authority over all things that happen by day, associated with beginnings.

Wohpe Daughter of Skan and born of that one parent (movement). Wohpe is the Goddess of  beauty, harmony and happiness.  She is the helper of the Grandmother Earth, wife of the South wind (Itokaga). She teaches games, behavior, and dance. She is known as the mediator and the beautiful one. Wohpe means meteorite. She is also known Ptehincalasanwin, She is represented by the color blue and her stone is turquoise.  Another aspect of wohpe is the White Buffalo Calf Maiden, or Pte San Wi. In this form She gives the pipe and seven sacred rites to the people. Her other gift is the calendar.

Wanagi The soul. The soul is comprised of many parts, the ghost, or shadow is one aspect of the soul. There also is one’s reflection, or image,

 Zuzeca The Snake, Can be a bad omen. Represents hidden things, it is the symbol of the divine mother Earth (Maka Ina) along with the Rabbit.

The Power of Song: Yuwipi Songs

The Power of Song: Yuwipi Songs

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To learn more, click here: Yuwipi

The Power of Song: Yuwipi songs

This set of songs are used by us for Yuwipi Ceremony. The rite begins with the loading of the pipe during which 1. pipe filling song is sung. Then the Medicine man is bound while 2. song to tie is sung, the lights are extinguished leading directly to the altar song (this Is only learned in person and should never be sung outside of ceremony).Song 4 and 5 call the stone spirits,following that are the deer, mole, and the bat. At this point in the ceremony a prayer song is sung, this is a time when prayers may be made. After the prayers is a time of healing. Songs 10-14 are for that healing (15-20 are for the spirit’s healing work as well, but 10-14 are for the main doctoring). Song 15 (like 14) is to call in the help of the spider. The thunder being songs are sung then, when sung at night these songs call ghosts, in this case we are calling the ghosts of Heyokas (sacred clowns). although we are not Heyoka ourselves, we call upon them for help. 16 is a thunderbeing song, 17 is a heyoka song, 18 is a Yuwipi Thunderbeing song and song 19 is a Thunderbeing song for healing. Song 20 can be seen as a calling song but is also seen as a prayer song. 21-23 are for the spirits to untie the medicine man, at this point the spirits are offered various things with songs 24, 25, 26, and 27, this begins the sequence for the sending away of the spirits which is vitally important! Song #28 opens the doorway to help the spirits to return to their world while #29 ends the ceremony. Many of these songs are interchangeable and this particular arrangement of them is specific to Wahehe Yuha Maniktelo.

Click on the songs below to here them and be sure to read the rest of this blog for a better understanding of spiritual music!

1. Canunpa Olawan

Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Canunpa wanji yuha ilatake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

 Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo, Kola lecelecun wo.

Hecanuki nitunkasila waniyang u ktelo.

Hocoka wanji yuha ilotake ci.

Miksuya opagi yo.

Hecanuki taku yacinki iyecetu ktelo.

English

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like, this My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

With this one Sacred Pipe sit down.

Remember as you fill the pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this, My friend do it like this.

When you do it this way the Grandfathers will come down to see you.

In this one Sacred Circle sit down.

Remember as you fill your pipe.

When you do it this way what you want will happen.

Español

Mi amigo haslo haci, mi amigo haslo haci, mi amigo haslo haci.

Cuando se hace haci los abuelos bajan a verte.

Con esta pipa sagrada sientate.

Rewerda que cuando llenas tu pipa.

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede.

Mi amigo haslo haci, mi amigo haslo haci, mi amigo haslo haci.

Cuando se hace haci, los abvelos bajan a verte.

Con esta pipa sagrada sientate.

Rewerda que cuando llenas tu pipa.

Cuando lo haces haci, lo que quieres sucede.

2. Song To Tie

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo, Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo,

 Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo ,Anpetu ki le mitawa yelo.

English

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me,

This day belongs to me, This day belongs to me.

Espanol

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece,

Este dia me pertenece, este dia me pertenece.

3. Yuwipi Altar song Is learned in person and should never be sung outside of ceremony.

4. Stone Song 1

Wakan oyate wan waniyang u ktelo, Wayankaya yo.

English

A sacred nation is appearing, Come and see.

Espanol

Una nacion sagrada se levanta ven a ver.

5. Stone Song 2

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

Wankata peta wanlakelo, Henake tunkan pica wanlakelo.

English

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Up above you have seen a spark, They are stones that you have seen.

Espanol

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que tu has visto.

Arriba alto, has visto una chispa, Hay piedras que to has visto.

6. Black Tail Deer Song

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo, Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

Le miye ca tanin ya nawajin yelo,

Sinte sapela le miye ca tanin ye nawajin yelo.

English

This is me visible I am standing, This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

This is me visible I am standing,

The black tail deer, visible I am standing.

Espanol

Este soy yo, visible, aqui de pie. Este soy yo, visible, aqui de pie.

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

Este soy yo, visible, aqui de pie.

Venado de cola negra, visible ante ti estoy de pie.

7. Mole Song

Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo, Maka takiya taku wakan wan u welo.

Wahehela wan u welo, Wani yanku yelo.

Taku wakan wan echela, Wana u welo, Wana e yelo, Wani yanku welo.

English

From the earth something sacred is coming, From the earth something sacred is coming.

A mole is coming, It is coming to see you.

There is nothing not sacred, He is coming, He is here, It is coming to see you.

Espanol

Desole la tierra algo sagrado viene.Desole la tierra algo sagrado viene

Un topo viene., viene a verte.

No hay nada, que no sea sagrado, el viene, el esta aqui, viene a verte.

8. Bat Song

Hanhepi ki mita wayelo wayankiye yo, Hupakiglake wan heya u welo.

English

The night belongs to me  look this way, A bat has come, saying this.

Espanol

La noche pertenece a mirarme así, Un murciélago ha venido diciendo esto.

9. Prayer Song

Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

Makasitomniyan hoye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye, Iwayeci namah’un ye.

English

Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say.

All over the world a voice I send, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say, Hear what I have to say.

Espanol

Escucha lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir.

En todo el mundo una voz que envío, escuchar lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir, escuchar lo que tengo que decir.

10. Doctoring Song

Wanktahan wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo,Wanktahan wau welo,

Wicatancan piya ,wakaginkta ca wau welo, Wanktahan wau welo.

English

Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming, Up above I am coming.

A body I am going to make well, so I am coming, Up above I am coming.

Espanol

Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo,

Un werpo voy a hacer bien, haci yo vengo, Desde arriba yo vengo.

11. Aurora Borealis Song

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo, Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo,

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

Makpiya tahin ki le miyelo,

Wamayankiyo, inyan wasicun ca nape wayelo.

English

The aurora borealis this is me, The aurora borealis this is me,

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

The aurora borealis this is me, 

Behold the power stone of a dreamer is my healing hand.

Espanol

La aurora borealis, este soy yo, La aurora borealis, este soy yo,

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora.

La aurora borealis, este soy yo,

Siente la poderosa piedra de un sonador, es la mano sanadora.

12. Stone Doctoring Song

Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

Tunkan tatioblecha wan, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tip i ghi le camu welo, Ilelea tipi ghi le camu welo.

English

Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

The lodge of the stones, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this, Within glittering sparks, I have done this.

Dentro de las  chispas brilladoras yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

El temascal de piedras, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto, Dentro de las chispas brilladoras, yo hice esto.

13. Medicine Song

Pejuta wan cicu ktaca wayankiyeyo.

English

A medicine I am going to give you, look this way.

Espanol

Un medicina te voy a dar, mira hacia aca.

14. Spider Song

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo.

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo.

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo.

Wankata hot anin kun le miye wamayankiyo ewaye namah’un yelo.

English

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Up above my voice is heard, behold me, so listen to me.

Espanol

Desde lo alto mi voz se eswcha, recibela eswchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se eswcha, recibela eswchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se eswcha, recibela eswchame.

Desde lo alto mi voz se eswcha, recibela eswchame.

15. Spider Song 2

Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo, tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

Tahia u welo tahia mani u welo, Iktomni wan tahia mani u welo.

English

A spider comes walking, He comes walking, he comes walking,              A spider comes walking.

He comes walking, he comes walking, A spider comes walking.

Espanol

Una arana viene caminando, el viene caminando, el viene caminando,

Una arana viene caminando.

el viene caminando, el viene caminando Una arana viene caminando.

16. Thunder Being Song 1

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo.

Leciya ya tuwa maki pan pelo, Wiohpeyata wakinyan oyate wan, Kola maki pan pelo.

English

Over here they are calling for me, Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation., My friends are calling for me.

Over here they are calling for me, To the west a thunder being nation, My friends are calling for me.

Espanol

Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Por aqui estan llamando por mi, Desde el oeste una nacion de seres relampago Mis amigos llaman por mi.

Por aqui estan llamando por mi,  Desde el oeste una nacion de seres,relampago Mis amigos llaman por mi.

17. Thunder Being Song 2

Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

Tehi ya wamiconza pe, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo, Oyate hanta po itateya mawani yelo.

English

People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

A difficult time is predicted for me, People move aside, I walk in the wind, People move aside, I walk in the wind.

Espanol

Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

Un tiempo dificil esta predecido para mi, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento, Gente muerase hacia el lado, yo camino en el viento.

18. Thunder Being Song 3

Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo.

He wamakaskan wanji gyi Cante eiyapa wayelo, Leciya ya tokeya mawani yelo.

English

Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first, Over here I walk first.

I make some animals’ hearts beat, Over here I walk first.

Espanol

Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero, Por aqui yo camino primero.

Yo hago que el corazon de algonos animales lata, Por aqui yo camino primero.

19. Thunder Being Song 4

Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lowan, Makasitomniya kola ceyakiya pelo wan, Wankata taku wakan ke he wanla ke lo .

English

Up above something sacred you have seen, Up above something sacred you have seen, All around the world you have prayed to him, Up above something sacred you have seen.

Espanol

En lo alto algo sagrado has visto, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto,

En todo el mundo has rezado por el, En lo alto algo sagrado has visto,.

20. Calling Song

Tunkasila wamayank uye, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo, Tunkasila wamayank uyeyo.

Ikce wicasa ta canunpa wan Yuha hoye wayelo.

Mitakuye ob wani ktelo, Heyaya hoye wayelo.

English

Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me, Grandfather come and see me.

With the common people’s pipe I send a voice.

So I may live with my relatives, I keep sending a voice.

Espanol

Abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme, abuelo ven a verme.

Con la pipa del pueblo, Yo mando una voz.

Para haci vivir con todas mis relaciones, Yo sigo mandando una voz.

21. Sone Song 3

Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo.

Wankata inyan wan, Hot anin ye, Hot anin ye, Wankata hot anin ye, Hot anin yelo.

English

Voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Up above a stone, voices are heard, voices are heard, Up above voices are heard, voices are heard.

Espanol

Voces se eswchan, voces se eswchan, desde lo alto se eswchan voces, voces se eswchan, desde lo alto se eswchan voces, voces se eswchan, por encima de una piedra.

22. Spider Untying Song (1)

Cokata wankan y mica kta ca, Cokata eya ya nawajin yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo, Kola ehek’un lecun we yelo.

English

He is preparing a sacred center for me, I am standing in the center sending a voice, My friend, you have said this, do it this way, My friend, you have said this, do it this way.

Espanol

El prepara un centro sagrado para mi, Estoy parado en el centro mandando una voz,Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, haslo de esta forma, Mi amigo, tu has dicho esto, haslo de esta forma.

23. Dancing Song

Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

Inyan wasicun ca ,waci yau welo wayankiyeyo, Waci yau welo wayankiyeyo.

English

Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

The white stone spirits, take a look as I come dancing, Take a look as I come dancing.

Espanol

Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, 

Los espiritus de piedra blanca, ven a mirar, qur vengo bailando, Ven a mirar, que vengo bailando, 

 24. Pipe Offering Song

Wayankiye, wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

Wayankiye, wayankiye, Canunpa kile wakan yelo wayankiye.

English

Take a look, Take a look, Take a look,This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Take a look, Take a look, This pipe is sacred. Take a look.

Espanol

Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Esta pipa es sagrada, Toma una vista, Toma una vista, Toma una vista,  Esta pipa es sagrada.

25. Offering Song

Lenake, wayang u yelo, Lenake hiyo uye

Waunye ki lena hoye miciciyiyo He mitakuye ob wani wacin yelo, Tunkasila omakiyayo.

Canli pahta ki lena hoye miciciyiyo, He mitakuye ob zaniya waon wacin yelo Tunkasila omakiyayo.

English

Look, all of these I have given you, Come take what I have offered you

With this cloth I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives I want to live, Grandfather help me.

With these tobacco ties I have pledged myself to you, With my relatives in good health I will live, Grandfather, help me.

Espanol

Mira todo esto te e dado, Ven a coger lo que te e ofrecido,

Con esta manta me ofresco hacia ti, Con mis relativos quiero vivir, Abuelo ayudame

Con estos amares de tabaco me ofresco haciati, Con mis relativos en buena saud voy vivir, abuelo ayudame.

26. Offering Song 2

Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

Ikce wicasa ta canunpi ki leyuha, Hoye yayo, hoye yayo, Tunkasila le ampelo.

English

Sending a voice, sending a voice, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

A common man is holding this pipe, Sending a voice, sending a voice, Grandfather on this day.

Espanol

Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este dia.

Un hombre comun agvanta una pipa, Mandando una voz, Mandando una voz, Abuelo en este dia.

 27. Closing Song 1

Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, Tunkan unsi unlapi yelo, He mitakuye ob wani kta ca, Lena cicu welo.

English

Stone spirits have pity on us, Stone spirits have pity on us, With my relatives I will live, So I give you these offerings.

Espanol

Espiritus de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Espiritus de piedra ten piedad de nosotros, Con toda relaciones yoy a vivir haci te ofresco todo esto.

28. Closing Song 2

Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Hot aninyan kin najin pelo, Tunkasila ta wokonze ca, Lena cicu welo. Hot aninyan kin najin pelo.

English

As we leave our voices are heard, As we leave our voices are heard, It is Grandfather’s will, That I give you these offerings. As we leave our voices are heard.

Espanol

Mientras partimos, nuestra voces se eswchan, Mientras partimos,nuestra voces se eswchan, Es la voluntad de el Abuelo, Que te doy estas ofrendas, Mientras partimos, nuestra voces se eswchan, 

 29. Ending Song

Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo, Kola, lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

Anpetu okihica cicu welo, Kola lena cicu welo wayankiyelo.

English

My friend, I have given you these. Behold them, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

The day has made it possible to give you these offerings, My friend, I have given you these. Behold them.

Espanol

Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

El dia ha echo posible poder darte estas ofrendas, Mi amigo te e dado esto, recibelo

click here for a lyrics download (Microsoft word)

 The Power of Song: Yuwipi songs

The power of song is felt not only in how it is sung but most importantly in it’s origins. Hearing someone sing Amazing Grace can be riveting and moving experience.  The reasons for this are found in the circumstance in which that song was composed like many old church hymns, Amazing Grace was written under conditions of great duress and emotional intensity.  When one hears such songs it actually invokes the spirits involved and the flavor of the moment that imbues the song with real magic. This can be seen as evident in a very pragmatic and scientific way.

  A song of any kind represents a connecting link to a time and place of  it’s origins.  This takes place the way that electricity follows the current of a long copper wire.  It is simple to determine if a song carries power, what feelings does it evoke?  In our numb domestic culture it has become increasingly hard for people to sense the spiritual beings because they come as feelings.  In a domesticated world where most people aren’t even in touch with their own feelings, sensing the feelings in the wind like a wild animal does is quite unlikely.  Every so often you may sense a spirit without knowing what’s really happening.

  Let’s say you’re going through some old boxes and you handle an old hairbrush.  You look at it’s color or design and put it somewhere else thinking nothing of it.  Later around dusk you get a peculiar sensation reminding you of the smell of soap that was in your grandmother’s bathroom during your childhood.  This scenario represents the visitation of a spirit.  As humans we may link the sensation we had of spirits in our grandmother’s bathroom with the smell of her soap.  This is one reason why aromatic smudge herbs are used in any ritual in any culture.

Most people would think nothing of these kinds of feelings and would call them “memories”.  In a similar way one could get feelings handling a personal item that belonged to someone else’s family.  One may get an odd sensation or deja vu without realizing that they are sensing a spirit’s presence.  One too may assume, from the explanation, that the spirits sensed are ghosts, like the sensation of the grandmother.  What these sensations are, are elemental beings that follow an ancestral lineage like the water spirits sensed by the child in the grandmother’s bathroom.  Using this story as an analogy one may say that the smell of the soap or the handling of the hairbrush are like the songs in the act of calling the spirits.  Singing Amazing Grace in an all night Tipi Meeting you can feel the energy, or the flavor of the moment, dramatically shift.  Although the song is still within spiritual content it is still totally different in it’s origins and the mood from which it was born.

In the sweat lodge when someone sings a European based pseudo Indian camp song it feels like the generated momentum of the lodge is all of a sudden  flushed away leaving the strange barbaric feeling of Spanish Conquistadors or the lineages of other early settlers. The spirits in this case follow the families, the languages and other European influences, as well as the line of the song.  What I mean by the line of the song is it’s history.  Like an electric wire this line has the means of transmission.

There’s another aspects of songs where the concept of the “line of the spirits” is concerned.  Let’s say you made up a song with the intention of attracting a spirit.  Within the “flavor of the moment” that characterizes the spirits presence, you sing your song, and with it calling attention to yourself with this song.  You then have created a direct line to that specific spirit.  (Although this works do not assume that the spirits will behave the way you want or expect).  One could use a fragrance in the same way there is a connection between memory of smells with emotions.  In invoking spirits we are invoking memories, feelings.  The spirits are these feelings directly.  When you have a certain feeling of any kind you are actually embodying a spirit.  So by all this one can see that for a domestic human to summon the spirits of the wild, without a direct spiritual line of connection, is nearly impossible.  That is another one of our reasons for protecting and sharing these sacred ancient songs.  They can be of immeasurable aid to the future population of nerds that our culture is creating.  At a time when intelligence eclipses intuition altogether there can still be the hope of the spirits possible intervention.

Taking a close analytical analysis of primordial spiritual songs we can find some very interesting points.  First of all, ancient spiritual traditions of the world use what is known as the pentatonic scale.  It is based upon the number five and it predates the harmonic scale.  Pentatonic scale is used exclusively for spiritual applications even in cultures predominated by the harmonic scales.  The pentatonic scale flourishes in American culture through Blues and Gospel music which have African roots.  In all indigenous cultures when invoking the spirits, a falsetto is employed.  This clearly illustrates an emotional relationship between man and spirit and it shows that some spirits are attuned to crying.

Another marked difference in primordial spiritual music is the beat.  Domestic music uses a beat that is to the time of the song that is how children in industrialized cultures are taught to clap hands in school.  Native American music like African and other aboriginal societies, utilizes the opposite.  Professional drummers from modernized cultures have to unlearn the tendency to clap to time, finding the heartbeat in the background of the song.

In all Lakota spiritual songs and Native American spiritual music the songs start out high and end up low following the natural laws of gravity.  In hearing song birds in nature even when a bird’s song goes high it is always followed by a radical plummet back down again.  Even when the Catholic Church banned the pentatonic scale they still used it along with falsetto  and the high to low intonations for Latin prayer recitations.

It is obvious that the difference in native dance music and others is that the volume is louder and the range is further breaking through the yodel all the way to the other side.  Anyone can do this with practice by building the muscles of the larynx and learning how to relax other muscles at the same time.  Lakota song, like it’s language, are toned from the center of the head rather than from the soft palette.  This gives it a resonant nasal quality.  This is lacking in English where all the sounds are projected out of the mouth with the front of the mouth, unlike primordial languages.  In domestic society we have found changes in human language, our thoughts as well as our habits. An interesting change that has occurred is that the male alto voice types are becoming rarer.  This may be due to hormonal changes related to domestication.

The most important difference in aboriginal music are the origins of the songs.  A song is a gift from the spirits.  A person receives a vision with a gift of the song for the people.  Most all of the native songs have come about in this way and not from regular composition.  This is illustrated by the lyrics which are in first person from the spirit’s standpoint.  This is a very important point to remember because it too defines authentic aboriginal song and is totally absent in industrialized cultures.  A Lot of people find our blog site looking for English sweat lodge songs.  There is no such thing as an English sweat lodge song nor is there such a thing as a Spanish sweat lodge song.  None of the Spanish and English so called Indian songs were gifted by the spirits, these songs were all composed.  None of these contemporary songs are in first person from the spirits point of view.  None of them use falsetto, pentatonic scale, have a back beat or go from high to low.  So if you hear someone singing a song claim to have been a Native American spiritual song yet it is in a harmonic scale do not take them serious.

To recognize a fraudulent song, as you can see, is very simple.  But there are other things that define domestic compositions.  “We all fly like eagles,  high above the earth, circling the universe, with wings of pure light”.  The example begins not only with a fantasy statement but also completely untrue in every way.  It expresses the need to be greater out of a low self esteem which is a distinct character trait of this modern culture.  It is common in the Lakota songs to hear this statement “I am a common man” or “a common man is saying this”.  The most prevalent phrase in Lakota songs is “pity me” (have compassion).  Secondly is “help me” as well as ”God I am suffering”.   This is reflected by most spiritual songs of any traditions regardless of age or culture.

The purpose in making distinctions in spiritual and non spiritual songs is to defend true spirituality without allowing fraudulent mystics to damage the authentic power.  Even if it is done innocently and inadvertently, measures need to be taken to safe keep the ancient traditions of the earth. If some one involved in Hinduism translated Sanskrit mantras into another language they would be rendered useless because specific spirits are en-trained to them in their original form. Traditionally, in all cultures, an invocation is seen as a formula, a specific set of sounds and syllables used to contact specific beings. There is that whole concept of being able to call a spirit after learning it’s name.

To retain true spiritual connections in our (all of us) ceremonies, we must protect them from too much modern change. In the same way there should never be a drive-thru, or email confessionals in the church, there should never be bogus Indian songs as part of any REAL sweat lodge.  the reason for this preservation is not to stop the evolution of a native path but to stop the domestication of it.  That de-claws it making it an obedient pet rather than a fierce panther that inspires reverence and change.  It controls the spirit by denying it access to the people, it transforms the medicine power into a badge of honor rather than as a spiritual gift.

The Power of Song: Yuwipi songs

ALTAR DESIGNS

ALTAR DESIGNS

Often people ask us about ritual protocol.  Why are things done a certain way?  What color prayer flags (robes) go in which direction?  There are very specific reasons for these details but most importantly know that the rules vary from one medicine person to another.  In addition to this each root family or tiospaye has specific rules. An altar design from Fools Crow would differ from that of Henry Crowdog.  The directional colors vary as well as some of the songs that are used.  Each Medicine Man or Woman receives from the Universe a vision.  The vision usually instructs the changes that should occur in the altar design.  although the changes maybe slight they are powerful symbols to the spirits that they call.  So that’s one reason why an altar design is different from another, they call different spirits.  Such a vision (of an altar) comes with a song.  That is why the Yuwipi or Lowampi ceremony have different altar songs. 

So when attending a different sweat lodge don’t expect that the songs you are used to will be sung.  One word may be changed, there may not be a drum or there might be a rattle ( wagmuha).  The sweat lodge door may face a different direction. Generally, as with the Sundance, it faces west to call the Wakinyan or Thunder Spirits ( Lakota ).                                                                                                                                                

If you are encountering difficulty or any problematic situations you can most likely look no further than the altar to find the solution. An altar cluttered with crystals and unnecessary items is usually the root cause of strife in any ceremonial event. Do not allow participants to place unrelated objects upon the altar. What we want here is a flow directed by the spirits them selves, so with out proper instruction, having nothing upon the altar would be far better than clutter!

Oftentimes we will sponsor a sweat lodge with other Pipe carriers and or medicine people.  We will have to ask them, what color prayer flags (robes) do you want and in what direction?  Do you want a buffalo skull on the altar and which direction should it face, toward the lodge or the fire?  Should we make prayer ties and what color?  After we find out which way everything goes, you can find out the reasons why things are the way they are.  The leader should know all the answers to the directional colors their presiding animals, spirits, the altar design, the meanings of the songs as well as when and why they are sung. 

An All Night Tipi Meeting may vary profoundly from one Roadman to another.  This is especially so because The native American Church is an inter-tribal religion.  There are two branches in general the Half Moon and the Cross Fire.  Each Roadman facilitates the ceremony differently.  Usually it is understood that at a different fireplace or altar the form of the ritual will be different in alot of ways, yet basicly structurally the same.  Even the symbolism can have different explanations.

We believe

 

       We believe

We believe in the freedom of religion. Click here to read more

 

Mitakuye Oyasin

          We believe that we are all related we are all sons and daughters of God we are all related to each other as humans, we are all related to the animals, the two legged, four legged, winged and all the moving things.  We are all in turn related to the earth, sky, and all that there is and that we come from the stars. 

 

Wakan Tanka

          We believe in the one God the Great Mystery, Wakan Tanka.  As everything it is four divisible by four and again divisible into the sixteen great powers of the universe,  Chief God, Great Spirit, Creator, Executive, Stone, Earth, Sky, Sun, Thunder Beings, Beautiful One, Wind, Moon, Buffalo, Bear, Four Winds, and Whirlwind.  The sixteen each divisible by four infinitely into all there is, known, unknown and unknowable. 

Chanunpa

          We believe in our prayers, in the power of the sacred pipe, and the White Buffalo Calf Maiden who brought the pipe to the earth for all its’ people.  We believe in her teachings, her blessing power and the promise of her return.  

       

  Inipi  Wakan                                                                                                                     

 We believe in the purifying and cleansing power of the sweat lodge ceremony, the sacrifice made by the Stone Nations, the Tunkasila (spirits) and by all the  participants.  We believe in praying within this mother’s womb for sobriety, clarity and physical health. 

Hanbleceya (Vision Quest)

          We believe that the everlasting word of Goddess/God is spoken from every part of the divine Creation, That through nature, Hanbleceya (vision quest) as well as Inipi Wakan (sweat lodge), Yuwipi, Sacred fire and Sun Dance the Great Mystery speaks to us all directly without exceptions, intermediaries or interpreters. 

 

Yuwipi / Lowanpi

          We believe in the night sing, the power of inyan/the stone, the miraculous healing power of the ancestors and the sacred songs.  We believe in the Wiwila/Little People, animal spirits, and the various other Tunkasila (spirits). We believe in the emptiness of the Medicine Man as a hollow bone for the spirits’ work.

 Wiwang Wacipi

          We believe in the annual Sun Dance, the pipe, the sacrifice of the sacred cottonwood tree, the power of the sun, the eternal flame and that the sacrifices of the dancers benefits and purifies all the people.                 

All Night Prayer Vigils  

        We believe in the sacred fire, the holy water, the moon altar and their blessings.  We believe in the sacred healing power of the plant nations and that our prayers are heard and attended to.  We believe that we will be judged, held accountable for our actions in this life, the afterlife and in the forgiveness of sins. 

Calendar

          We believe in the natural rhythms of day and night, the flow of the seasons and movement of the stars.  There is a time for everything under heaven, a time for birth and a time for death and that the times should be kept, reckoned and observed.   

Tiospaye

          We believe in family, extended family, adopted family and our spiritual family.  We believe in holding regular meetings to govern, reward and discipline our group in a humane aboriginal manner.  We respect our elders as well as our men, women and children.  We honor those that have passed with offerings and the caring for souls.

 We Believe in Wakan Tanka

 

Wakan Tanka or the Great Mystery is similar to most concepts of God. As the Creator, everything comes from Wakan Tanka. Animals, stones, trees, lakes, all of them are a piece of the original being. Wakan Tanka is also the culmination of all spiritual powers of the universe. There are four aspects of the Great Mystery, each divided into four making sixteen major universal powers. Each part together form a never ending hoop, an everlasting circle represented in all of our ceremonies. 

The four highest powers known as Wakan Akanta are Wi (sun), Skan (sky), Maka (earth), and Inyan (stone). Next to the highest powers are the Wakan Kolaya (friends of the mysterious). These are Hanwi (moon),  Tate (wind), wohpe (falling star), and the Wakinyan (thunderbeings). The Wakan Kolaya are the consorts of the Wakan Akanta (Wakan means that which controls life force). Together they are known collectively as the Wakan Kin, the mysterious or the unfathamable. This is the part of Wakan Tanka that is resposible for creation. The Wakan Kin are paired in order of importance. Sun with moon, sky with wind, earth with falling star, and finally stone with thunderbeings. This is basically the same as in most indigenous mythologies like Greek, Hindu, or African.

The next in line are the Wakan Kuya or the lesser mysteries. These are tatanka (buffalo), hununpa (two legged), tate tob (four winds), and wamni omni (whirlwind). The next four, wakan lapi, are known as those who are similar to the mysteries. They are wanagi (soul), niya (life breath), (ghost), and sicun (spiritual power). All beings possess a part of wakan lapi. Everything has a spirit or immortal power called sicun. When a human or any animal is born it inherits this power from  Wakan Kin. 

 

“True spiritual teachers are not focused on money but on helping you reach spiritual independence, a direct connection with the divine and the tools for using that direct connection”.

Wahe Yuha Maniktelo.

 

The Singing Stone is not governed by or subject to any political organization or tribal government. As a newly defined denomination of Aboriginal American Spiritual practice, we reserve the right to practice our Religion with the freedom granted to us by the United States Constitution as well as The United Nations. We are sovereign from all other Indigenous Spiritual groups and individuals in the same way that the Protestant church has amnesty from Catholicism.  We are committed to serve the public without discriminating against race, color, religion, or sexual orientation. We refuse to support any group or individual that intends on regulating or restricting the free flowing power of Divinity!

Hanbleceya, crying for a vision.

HANBLECEYA

The Vision Quest Ceremony is a way of communicating with the Great Spirit. There are many misconceptions about this fascinating rite. One misconception is that a vision is obtained by reaching a delirious state of exhaustion through fasting. This is untrue, visions are obtained because specific Spirits are called and sent to the person requesting a vision.

The magic of the ritual is dependent on many things. Mostly they depend upon an ancient lineage of Spirit Helpers that have been handed down within the tradition. Also a very important factor is that people pray in support from a distance. The supporters maintain a specially prepared sacred fire without letting it go out. Another important part of the vision quest are the prayer ties. Participant tie 405 tiny bundles of tobacco to a single string. This string will encircle the quester forming the Hocoka or center. This is done so that only certain spirits can enter. The tobacco each contain a prayer, the spirits then read each prayer as they arrive.

The vision quest is known as a hanbleceya, or “to cry for a vision”. Like many ceremonies it begins with a sweat lodge. Within the sweat lodge the person questing is handed a sacred canupa (sacred pipe). The quester is covered with a star quilt and led to a specific secluded place. The medicine man or woman prays and sings calling the spirits. The quester is left alone to pray all the while holding faithfully the sacred canupa and not letting it go.

When this ceremony is properly performed the person praying for a vision should not experience undue thirst or hunger. Also they will experience a communion with the Divine. Depending on the circumstance, that may include tele-portation, a soul journey, a visitation, or a simple message.

Experiencing a vision quest is a very fulfilling event. It is an initiatory rite of passage as well as a way of gaining answers from the Great Spirit. One may gain a connection with an ancestral guide or an animal spirit helper. Many misconceptions what is popularly known as a totem animal. One’s totem animal for instance may be a man or a tree but even this is misleading. A totem is a spiritual friend or power known as sicun. A bear totem for example may be the soul of a bear or the part of the Great Spirit (God) after which all bears were modeled.

A vision quest is usually a 24 hour experience. In our Lakota tradition the quest can last up to 4 days (and 3 nights). The amount of time depends upon the purpose of the ceremony and the individual. One does not necessarily have a more profound experience by questing for a long time. It is a magical rite depending upon the Spirits intervention and the prayers involved. The songs, the medicine man or woman, the supporters, the fire, the canupa, the tobacco prayer ties, the offerings, and the sweat lodge all work together to create a doorway for the person vision questing.

This ritual ends the way it began. The person is ceremoniously brought back to the sweat lodge where the accounts of the experience are shared and interpreted. The sacred canupa is lighted and finally smoked. Water and sometimes corn, meat, and fruit are shared to break the fast as well as to bless and strengthen everyone in a sacred way. after blessing oneself with the sacred pipe (canupa) and drinking water the ceremony comes to a close. The purpose of a vision quest is to commune with the divine. Vision Quest is a prerequisite of the Sundance and the annual obligation of the medicine man\woman.

To experience a Vision Quest with us first support at our Vision Quest camp. Check our events calendar. We usually hold  Vision Quest in late Spring and then again in early Fall.

Vision Quest Preparations
Click here to download the :Hanbleceya List
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To do the vision quest one would need to make the tobacco prayer ties. The 405 prayer ties are offerings for the 405 spirits of the Earth (Wasicun pi). The spirits that come will inspect each one ( they may not all come ).  The ties are also a protective device, in that only the 405 spirit may enter. Usually we use just basic cotton fabric. Normally the 405 ties are red but colors can vary depending on the situation. Be sure and contact us about this important detail. The fabric is cut into 2 inch squares.
The string to use may be yarn, kite string, or sinew (waxed nylon). A tiny pinch of tobacco is placed into a cloth square, using two slip knots, the bundle is tied without cutting the string. Keep the prayer ties an inch apart. You should only be praying while you do this, nothing else. It is nice to smudge the prayer ties each time you sit down to work on them. The ties should be rolled onto a small wad of sage as you go along, sort of like rolling a ball of yarn. They can be made in stages or all at once. Be sure the string will be long enough, pieces of string cannot be tied together. So make sure you wind up with one continuous line of 405 prayer ties 1 inch apart.
You will also need to make prayer flags, also known as robes. You will need 1/4 yard of red, yellow, black, gray, blue, green, brown, orange, and lavender. These should be new basic cotton. Also you will need 1/4 yard of red felt of any kind. A small hand full of tobacco is placed into the corner of the fabric and tied into a bundle with string. Each flag will be separate but make sure you leave about 7 inches of string  on either side of the bundle to tie these to sticks later.
Just before vision quest we will take a short hike to gather fresh sage and five forked sticks either chokecherry or juniper. The prayer flags will be tied to these just before the sweat lodge. The sage will be laid out upon the ground within the Hocoka.
For the red felt prayer flag (waluta) you will also need a shell button, a medicine wheel disc decorated with porcupine quills, and a special feather. These will be tied to the bundle in that order. Please contact us if you cannot find some of these supplies.
A metal bucket with a dipper and a plain knife will be needed. An extra quarter yard of red basic cotton fabric will be used to wrap all of these things with sage. All of the items used in the vision quest must be new and unused. You will need a new star quilt or a Pendleton blanket or a buffalo hide. Everything that has been mentioned so far will be given away afterwards, except the sage, which can be used throughout the year as smudge incense. An extra blanket should be brought. This can be a used blanket of any kind that you will not give away.
The most important item for the vision quest is the sacred canupa or sacred pipe. Those people who carry a canupa will use their own. We will provide a pipe (on loan) to those who do not have one. Like the bucket, dipper, and knife, their handles will be wrapped in sage with the extra red fabric.
During the Vision Quest, if you need to use the “bathroom” you will place your sweetgrass braid over the prayer tie string. You will step over the braid outside of the hocoka use the “bathroom” and step back over the sweetgrass braid into the hocoka and remove the sweetgrass braid from the prayer tie string. To avoid all this one should fast from solid foods one or two days before going up on the hill.
 In the event of the menses unexpectedly occurring while questing, a woman then is led away from the sequestered area and will be taken to the Moon Lodge. The ceremony ends for her then and can resume at a later date.( We will know if  the Moontime begins ).
 Appropriate attire for this event for men is a pair of shorts or underwear. Ladies wear a simple cotton dress. We have sweat dresses and all of the necessary ceremonial equipment available.
Anyone participating in the vision quest would be responsible for providing a feast for all of the supporters. In some cases one would give gifts to all of the supporters as well. Contact us for more details in regards to this. Some of the foods for this are specific and would have to be prepared during the Ceremony. A few groceries to feed some of the supporters are necessary as well (they will participate in a light fast).
Vision Quest Supporters
 
If you would like to be a supporter for the vision quest we would need help tending the fire and in the kitchen. The fire is attended to constantly so we would have to do it in shifts. We will be singing songs and praying. Supporters would be involved in the sweat lodges and in the actual bringing the quest-er to and from the Hocoka. Women are to wear skirts or dresses while on the premise. If a woman happens to have her moon time (menses) then we have a Moon Lodge for her to offer prayers from that space. This insures that her energy does not conflict with the Ceremony.
Supporting for a ceremony like this can be very empowering and profound. It is an opportunity to learn more about these ways. If you want to support someone who is doing the vision quest and you are unable to attend, you can do so at home. Some find it helpful to keep a candle lit to remember that people are out there and to connect with the sweat lodge fire. Food and water may be put out for the spirits as well as fasting yourself. Supporting a Hanbleceya is not complete without singing!!!
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Singing during vision Quest is very important. The gift of song, like all animals , is what we have been given to call out to the powers of the universe in a time of need! Naturally one would not want to sing closing songs . There are a whole variety of songs you would not want to sing which is just common sense. Each person has particular affiliations and powers that guide them, so in your heart you know what you need to call in. 

Any songs appropriate to you is good. keep in mind you have a limited time to receive a message so don’t waste you time singing “Jack and Jill went up the hill”. So many people decide to do a vision quest and wind up twiddling their thumbs, pining away the hours waiting for it to be over. Hanbleceya is not the time and place to be daydreaming of food and talking to your self in the same endless chatter that occupies your daily life. It is a time to stand and address the Sky, Earth, Moon, Stars and all the rest of nature. As it says in a prominent Hanbleceya song, “With difficulty I am standing”.

Most tribes and Peoples tend to avoid Ghosts. A Lot of things that the Lakota do are considered taboo. Nothing negative is meant in calling in the ghost nations, besides, by ghosts we do not mean lost souls but rather an elite group of immortals.

Know that most all Spiritual Lakota songs have come through a vision or dream, mostly from Hanbleceya. Every one has a song, a prayer, and a message to receive from the spirits. a song from the spirits is a gift of power. Do not take it lightly when you hear a song during vision quest or even an ordinary dream. Songs are doorways, corridors for the spiritual forces to use to help you. Do not idly sing them in the shower. it is said that some of the spirits may have to travel long distances and may take extreme risks to find you. Be sure you are not calling things unnecessarily. When on Vision Quest, SING!