The Singing Stone

The Singing Stonelogo FSICC7

The Singing Stone is a Religious Organization dedicated to preserving Native American Spiritual Ceremonies and Culture. We do this through the practice of Indigenous Rites in a Traditional manner. By providing services to the public as a Sacred Community, we aim to help all those who may be interested in experiencing and learning about the Spiritual Lineages and philosophies of The Americas. Everyone will benefit from our project, our county, area businesses, Reality and our struggling Property owners association.

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We Cry out for help, so that we may be able to have the facilities and Infrastructure needed to function as a Community of the Native American church. Donating to The Singing Stone will help us function as a Ceremonial Institute and a Spiritual Sanctuary for anyone seriously interested in being immersed in Aboriginal American culture.

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Our grounds will allow Spiritual Leaders and Elders from all over, to conduct a variety Traditional Ceremonies and Pre-Hispanic Rites throughout the year. With the appropriate Funding we will not only be able to Function as a Church and Community, but also create an Indigenous Burial Grounds.

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Help us now in our efforts to restore the Dignity of this Sacred Continent by securing a firm Foundation For the Generations to come. Help us serve the public in a way that can not only remind us of our Ancient American past, but also let us all take part in it. Donate to The Singing Stone, The sacred Fire of Itzachilatlan of Colorado (Fuego Sagrado de Itzachilatlan Colorado Corp.) and The Native American Church.

 

 These Funds will serve to facilitate Vision Quest (hanbleceya), Traditional Song Practice, Sun Dance, Pow Wow (and many other dances) as well as Tipi Meetings, Yuwipi, Lowanpi and Sacred Pipe Ceremonies (Canupa).

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Our goal is also to serve as a Church, but also will be available for everyone in our area who will use it respectfully. We are involved with Veterans, Rehabilitation, Young Adults as well as a Teen Center, we care for the Elderly, and also deal with Interfaith Education.

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Help us now and know that these precious American Traditions will stand strong and be supported in a time where Industrialization and domestication threaten them to Extinction. Donate to preserve the Integrity of Indigenous spiritual Traditions of this Continent for the Generations to come!

  •  Legal existence.
  •  Officially recognized creed and form of worship.
  •  Distinct ecclesiastical government.
  •  Code of doctrine and discipline.
  •  Distinct religious history.
  •  Organization of ordained ministers.
  •  Ordained ministers serving after completing a required course of study.
  •  Distinct Literature of its own.
  •  Membership not associated with any other church or denomination.
  •  Established places of worship.
  •  Regular congregations.
  •  Regular religious services.
  •  Schools for ministerial preparation.
  •  Schools and training for the youth.

Aho, Mitakuye Oyasin!

  We are a Colorado Religious Nonprofit, so you can make your tax deductible donations now!




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Sweet Medicine

Contáctenos, Contact us:

 

Saguache

Native American Church

 

State of Colorado Seal

All Night Prayer Vigils  

 ” We believe in the sacred fire, the holy water, the moon altar and their blessings.  We believe in the sacred healing power of the plant nations and that our prayers are heard and attended to.  We believe that we will be judged, held accountable for our actions in the afterlife and in the forgiveness of sins”. 

In bloom

Peyote Cactus In bloom

If you plan to attend a Peyote ceremony click this link to read about the details or read this article!

NEW link: The New York Times: Military Ends Conflict Of Career and Religion. By JAMES BROOKE

To find out about becoming a member of The Native American Church: MEMBERSHIP

From earliest recorded time, Peyote has been used by indigenous peoples. It is said to have been divinely discovered by a woman who was lost from her people. Being pregnant and having gone without water for four days, she was facing death. Hearing the voice of the medicine and its instructions, she gave birth, found her people and Taught them the songs and the Ceremony. This is why the Huichol peoples traditionally have a woman preside over the peyote ceremony.

Two main denominations formed from this rite. One is as it is practiced by the Huichol and their related tribes. The other was practiced by the Aztecs and the Anasazi.The modern form of the Peyote ceremony comes from several Tribes namely the Lipan Apache. About 2000 years ago the Apache took over the kokopelli trail, taking on the Anasazi ceremonials, and later sharing them with Other tribes.

This ancient statue is The Aztec Medicine Goddess. She Is poised in the usual Peyote fashion. This statue used to hold a staff and Gourd rattle.

This ancient statue is The Aztec Medicine God. He Is poised in the usual Peyote fashion. This statue used to hold a staff and Gourd rattle.

 Many North American tribes retained the use of peyote since ancient times and is still used by The Hopi, Navajo and other South West tribes following their Night Chants,         (according to anthropologists in the 1920s). Dried Peyote has been found by Archiologists as well as Native Americans in Chaco canyon and Mesa Verde. Some of the findings were estimated at 5000 years old. One variety found in a cave in Texas was from as far away as the Yucatan. According to the Spanish conquistadors, the medicine grew as far north as Santa Fe New Mexico in 1600. Many petroglyphs depicting the medicine are belived to be 14.000 years old.

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The Native American Church spread like wildfire during a horrible era in American history, which reached a peak during the industrial revolution. By 1874, the Kiowa and Comanche were confined to reservations and denied their natural way of life. Reservation life brought tremendous hardship to all Native Americans. The Native American Church provided hope for the people, allowing them to learn and adapt to the swiftly changing times. Peyote meetings have become the most popular Native American spiritual practice today, meetings are inter-tribal and have evolved into an international religion.

In the 1890s, James Mooney, an anthropologist from the Smithsonian Institution, attended Peyote meetings among the Kiowa and the Tarahumara. Finally, in 1918, after testifying in favor of American Indians at Congressional hearings, Mooney advised various tribes to obtain a legal charter to protect their religious freedom. With Mooney’s help, the Native American Church was officially incorporated in 1918. Today it is the most widespread indigenous religion among Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

 Quanah Parker (Left), John Wilson (right).

 Quanah Parker (Left), John Wilson (right).

 Quanah Parker, son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, who had been found by Comanches at the age of nine, becoming then, part of the tribe. Quanah Parker became Chief and from his grandfather inherited his life as a successful rancher and also became an influential statesman. He received the “half-moon” style of the peyote ceremony from the Lipan Apache leader Chiwat. The half moon altar honors the Divine feminine.

John Wilson was half Delaware, quarter French, and quarter Caddo and was one of the most powerful Ghost Dance leaders. The Caddo, like the Tarahumara, have always had the Peyote Ceremony, but as John was both a visionary and a Christian (his father was a minister) he formed what is known as the Big Moon or Straight fire form of Tipi meeting that incorporated Jesus Christ’s teachings. The “cross fire” ceremony came about among the Kiowa yet was influenced by Wilson, who traveled extensively around the same time as Parker during the early days of the Native American Church movement.

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Click here to go to our Peyote Songs page!

Congressional Seal

For most chapters of the Native American Church, the Peyote ritual begins at sundown and continues through the night. The ritual includes prayer, the eating of Peyote, Peyote songs, water rituals, and contemplation. It ends with breakfast in the morning. The peyote ritual aids in the communion with sacred spirits, and gives power, authority, guidance, and healing. The healing may be emotional, physical or spiritual.

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 Traditionally it is known to be good for the heart as well as the eyes, while in today’s modern world it is used as an antibiotic and as a psychiatric medication. Peyote also helps with alcoholism and in the treatment of addictions.

Peyote use has been wrongfully associated with narcotics because it was used in the manufacture of mescaline in the 1960s’. It is not used in those kinds of concentrations within the native American Church and is considered by law as a ”non-drug use of peyote”.

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Click here to read: The Congressional Digest: a gem of historical reading!

 All Night Tipi Meeting

 This Ceremony takes place in a tipi around a sacred fire. Participants sing  and pray in a circle following the guidance of a Roadman or Roadwoman. Specific songs are sung accompanied by a water drum. There are four parts to this ritual just as there are in sweat lodge. These four stages are represented by the red hot coals which are raked out and formed into designs. Individuals are helped with just about anything one could need help with in their life. These meetings are also a celebration of life, We welcome all faiths and traditions to this life changing spiritual evening of prayer.PETA WAKAN

 

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eagle and condor

All Night Tipi Meeting Preparations

This is a time to appear as we would like to be seen by our Creator, Wakan Tanka, or God. Women, this is a nice time to wear a dress or a skirt and shawl. If it is your moon time please let us know and and we will make the proper arrangements. Bring an extra towel and change of clothing if needed for the sweat lodge in case we have one. Some people fast before the ritual but we do not advise this. Avoiding excessive salt the day of can help. If you are Alcoholic, clean out fully as the spirits of the medicine don’t like those kind of ”spirits”.  This ancient ritual will take place in a tipi so please be prepared for hot or cold conditions. Bring a flashlight, blankets,  and a potluck dish to pass for the Ceremonial feast to follow the Meeting.

 We do not allow pets, alcohol, or drugs on the premise. Before arriving it is also helpful to start thinking about what areas in your life are needing attention in order to project those prayers clearly.

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In our lineage, an unopened package of tobacco is traditionally offered to the Roadman. We could use help leading up to the Meeting and especially the day of. Please contact us to offer your service in the ways that are best suited. We do not charge for any Ceremonies. If an individual is in great need of help, they will not be turned away because they are unable to make a donation. Putting energy forth through donations of any sort is a balanced way to walk in this world. There are many ways that your donations help to make these Ceremonies flow and for that we are grateful. Medicine must be purchased for this type of Ceremony as well as firewood, Sacred foods, and many other things.


 Please make your tax deductible donation now 


Click here to read details.

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  •  If you bring your children to a ceremony please understand that Federal law prohibits minors from ingesting peyote.
  • If you suffer from Schizophrenia you can expect a safe episode free experience. Peyote does not interfere with medications associated with Schizophrenia either. 
  • Persons regularly using Alcohol and other narcotics will find their experience to be one of discomfort.
  • Federal employees (including military) are federally protected from discrimination as members.
  • If your conscience is burdened with guilt or regret, you may become aware of why you have those feelings.
  • Know too that Peyote is not a cure all, it is the sacrament in a prayer meeting in which we rely upon our prayers to enlist a healing.
  • Also a Native American Church meeting need not include the sacred sacrament of the herb Peyote!

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Please donate to The Native American Church.

Click this link to learn about MEMBERSHIP!




  Click this link to read A.I.R.F.A.

Tipi of a singing rock

Inside roars Grandfather Fire

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